I Fight for a Living

Boxing and the Battle for Black Manhood, 1880-1915

Author: Louis Moore

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 025209994X

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 240

View: 8738

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The black prizefighter labored in one of the few trades where an African American man could win renown: boxing. His prowess in the ring asserted an independence and powerful masculinity rare for black men in a white-dominated society, allowing him to be a man--and thus truly free. Louis Moore draws on the life stories of African American fighters active from 1880 to 1915 to explore working-class black manhood. As he details, boxers bought into American ideas about masculinity and free enterprise to prove their equality while using their bodies to become self-made men. The African American middle class, meanwhile, grappled with an expression of public black maleness they saw related to disreputable leisure rather than respectable labor. Moore shows how each fighter conformed to middle class ideas of masculinity based on his own judgment of what culture would accept. Finally, he argues that African American success in the ring shattered the myth of black inferiority despite media and government efforts to defend white privilege.
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Sport and the Shaping of Civic Identity in Chicago

Author: Gerald R. Gems

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 1498598986

Category: History

Page: 314

View: 7500

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This study uses sociological and historical methodologies to analyze the role of sport in the formation of urban identity in Chicago. The author traces the transformation of Chicago from a frontier town to a commercial behemoth, examining its role as an immigration, transportation, and entertainment hub. The author argues that, as a pioneering leader in American sport history, Chicago allowed teams and athletes to forge a unique national and global identity. This thorough and well-researched study makes a major contribution to debates on the social and psychological functions of sport culture.
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Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 1538114984

Category:

Page: N.A

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The World of Jim Crow America: A Daily Life Encyclopedia [2 volumes]

Author: Steven A. Reich

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 144085081X

Category: History

Page: 805

View: 9771

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This two-volume set is a thematically-arranged encyclopedia covering the social, political, and material culture of America during the Jim Crow Era. • Gives readers hard to find but important details about the daily lives of African Americans during the Jim Crow era • Offers insights based on social history into the daily experiences of the average person, engaging students' curiosity rather than focusing on the events, dates, and names of "traditional history" • Presents information within a thematic organization that encourages a more in-depth study of specific aspects of daily life under Jim Crow • Includes related primary documents that enable students to view history more directly and reach their own conclusions about past events • Examines a wide range of topics such as work, family life, clothing and fashion, food and drink, housing and community, politics, social customs, and spirituality • Provides a general introduction to each volume, individual topic introductions, numerous images and illustrations, a timeline of events, and a bibliography identifying print and non-print resources
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Blood, Sweat, and Tears

Jake Gaither, Florida A&M, and the History of Black College Football

Author: Derrick E. White

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469652455

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 5506

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Black college football began during the nadir of African American life after the Civil War. The first game occurred in 1892, a little less than four years before the Supreme Court ruled segregation legal in Plessy v. Ferguson. In spite of Jim Crow segregation, Black colleges produced some of the best football programs in the country. They mentored young men who became teachers, preachers, lawyers, and doctors--not to mention many other professions--and transformed Black communities. But when higher education was integrated, the programs faced existential challenges as predominately white institutions steadily set about recruiting their student athletes and hiring their coaches. Blood, Sweat, and Tears explores the legacy of Black college football, with Florida A&M's Jake Gaither as its central character, one of the most successful coaches in its history. A paradoxical figure, Gaither led one of the most respected Black college football programs, yet many questioned his loyalties during the height of the civil rights movement. Among the first broad-based histories of Black college athletics, Derrick E. White's sweeping story complicates the heroic narrative of integration and grapples with the complexities and contradictions of one of the most important sources of Black pride in the twentieth century.
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