The Oxford Handbook of North American Archaeology

Author: Timothy Pauketat,Timothy R. Pauketat

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190241098

Category: History

Page: 704

View: 4169

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This volume explores 15,000 years of indigenous human history on the North American continent, drawing on the latest archaeological theories, time-honored methodologies, and rich datasets. From the Arctic south to the Mexican border and east to the Atlantic Ocean, all of the major cultural developments are covered in 53 chapters, with certain periods, places, and historical problems receiving special focus by the volume's authors. Questions like who first peopled the continent, what did it mean to have been a hunter-gatherer in the Great Basin versus the California coast, how significant were cultural exchanges between Native North Americans and Mesoamericans, and why do major historical changes seem to correspond to shifts in religion, politics, demography, and economy are brought into focus. The practice of archaeology itself is discussed as contributors wrestle with modern-day concerns with the implications of doing archaeology and its relevance for understanding ourselves today. In the end, the chapters in this book show us that the principal questions answered about human history through the archaeology of North America are central to any larger understanding of the relationships between people, cultural identities, landscapes, and the living of everyday life.
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New Mexico and the Pimería Alta

The Colonial Period in the American Southwest

Author: John G. Douglass,William Graves

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 1607325748

Category: Social Science

Page: 452

View: 8365

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Focusing on the two major areas of the Southwest that witnessed the most intensive and sustained colonial encounters, New Mexico and the Pimería Alta compares how different forms of colonialism and indigenous political economies resulted in diverse outcomes for colonists and Native peoples. Taking a holistic approach and studying both colonist and indigenous perspectives through archaeological, ethnohistorical, historical, and landscape data, contributors examine how the processes of colonialism played out in the American Southwest. Although these broad areas—New Mexico and southern Arizona/northern Sonora—share a similar early colonial history, the particular combination of players, sociohistorical trajectories, and social relations within each area led to, and were transformed by, markedly diverse colonial encounters. Understanding these different mixes of players, history, and social relations provides the foundation for conceptualizing the enormous changes wrought by colonialism throughout the region. The presentations of different cultural trajectories also offer important avenues for future thought and discussion on the strategies for missionization and colonialism. The case studies tackle how cultures evolved in the light of radical transformations in cultural traits or traditions and how different groups reconciled to this change. A much needed up-to-date examination of the colonial era in the Southwest, New Mexico and the Pimería Alta demonstrates the intertwined relationships between cultural continuity and transformation during a time of immense change and highlights contemporary thought on the colonial experience. Contributors: Joseph Aguilar, Jimmy Arterberry, Heather Atherton, Dale Brenneman, J. Andrew Darling, John G. Douglass, B. Sunday Eiselt, Severin Fowles, William M. Graves, Lauren Jelinek, Kelly L. Jenks, Stewart B. Koyiyumptewa, Phillip O. Leckman, Matthew Liebmann, Kent G. Lightfoot, Lindsay Montgomery, Barnet Pavao-Zuckerman, Robert Preucel, Matthew Schmader, Thomas E. Sheridan, Colleen Strawhacker, J. Homer Thiel, David Hurst Thomas, Laurie D. Webster
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Hunter-gatherers in history, archaeology and anthropology

Author: Alan J. Barnard

Publisher: Berg Publishers

ISBN: 9781859738207

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 278

View: 731

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This book provides a definitive overview of hunter-gatherer historiography, from the earliest anthropological writings through to the present day. What can early visions of the hunter-gatherer tell us about the societies that generated them? How do diverse national traditions, such as American, Russian and Japanese, manifest themselves in hunter-gatherer research? How does current thinking on the subject reflect trends within the social sciences? Answering these questions and many more, this book provides a much-needed assessment of the history of thought on one of science's most intriguing subjects.
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Trend, Tradition, and Turmoil

What Happened to the Southeastern Archaic? : Proceedings of the Third Caldwell Conference, St. Catherines Island, Georgia, May 9-11, 2008

Author: David Hurst Thomas,Matthew C. Sanger

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Excavations

Page: 341

View: 7734

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The late Archaic of the American Southeast is typically described as a time of population growth, innovative developments in subsistence strategies, and increased social complexity. Although it is difficult to generalize, many early Woodland communities are characterized as relatively small scale, fairly mobile foragers organized into unranked or minimally ranked lineages and clans. Early Woodland groups also seem to be more socially isolated than their late Archaic predecessors, with a decline in regional exchange networks. The papers in this volume were presented at a conference entitled "What Happened in the Late Archaic?" which was co-sponsored by the American Museum of Natural History and the St. Catherines Island Foundation and held on St. Catherines Island (Georgia), May 9-11, 2008. The Third Caldwell Conference invited the participants to engage the appropriate archaeological data from the American Southeast, specifically addressing the nature of change during the late Archaic-early Woodland transition. This volume consists of a dozen substantive papers, followed by three discussant contributions.
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The Amerindian Microcosm

Anthropology, Comparative History, Ecology, Genetics and Evolution

Author: Francisco M. Salzano

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 1527536181

Category: Social Science

Page: 607

View: 1472

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As this book shows, a fascinating chapter of the human evolutionary history has been written in the American continent. In pre-Columbian times, America was inhabited by hunter-gatherer peoples, although, in some places, new technological innovations arose, resulting in the emergence of organized states and cities larger than some important European counterparts. The arrival of the European conquerors and settlers and African slaves dramatically changed the course of this history, however. Despite the turmoil in this post-contact period, some small and isolated communities maintaining hunter-gatherer lifestyles and speaking rare Native languages remained, indicating a scenario that had undergone few changes in thousands of years. This volume constitutes a rich source of information on several topics related to Native American history that will be of interest for professionals in several academic and scientific fields. In addition to demographic, evolutionary, and cultural perspectives, this book considers the revolutionary development of sophisticated laboratory and bioinformatic approaches, using both whole genomes and specific genetic regions to understand classical questions of the past, present, and future not only of Native Americans and their descendants, but of all of humankind.
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Guide

A Guide to Departments, a Directory of Members

Author: American Anthropological Association

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Anthropology

Page: N.A

View: 4910

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Handbook of North American Indians

Environment, origins, and population

Author: Douglas H. Ubelaker,William C. Sturtevant

Publisher: US Government Printing Office

ISBN: 9780160775116

Category: History

Page: 1156

View: 506

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Encyclopedic summary of prehistory, history, cultures and political and social aspects of native peoples in Siberia, Alaska, the Canadian Arctic and Greenland.
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Nature Across Cultures

Views of Nature and the Environment in Non-Western Cultures

Author: Helaine Selin

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9401701490

Category: Science

Page: 482

View: 7293

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Nature Across Cultures: Views of Nature and the Environment in Non-Western Cultures consists of about 25 essays dealing with the environmental knowledge and beliefs of cultures outside of the United States and Europe. In addition to articles surveying Islamic, Chinese, Native American, Aboriginal Australian, Indian, Thai, and Andean views of nature and the environment, among others, the book includes essays on Environmentalism and Images of the Other, Traditional Ecological Knowledge, Worldviews and Ecology, Rethinking the Western/non-Western Divide, and Landscape, Nature, and Culture. The essays address the connections between nature and culture and relate the environmental practices to the cultures which produced them. Each essay contains an extensive bibliography. Because the geographic range is global, the book fills a gap in both environmental history and in cultural studies. It should find a place on the bookshelves of advanced undergraduate students, graduate students, and scholars, as well as in libraries serving those groups.
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