Human Rights and the Care of the Self

Human Rights and the Care of the Self

adopt care of the self as one strategy to instill human rights “as a way of life,” this is what I have in mind. The goal is certainly not to tie human rights to “self-interest” in a narrowly self-serving way. It is, instead, to devise a ...

Author: Alexandre Lefebvre

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822371694

Category: Philosophy

Page: 264

View: 383

When we think of human rights we assume that they are meant to protect people from serious social, legal, and political abuses and to advance global justice. In Human Rights and the Care of the Self Alexandre Lefebvre turns this assumption on its head, showing how the value of human rights also lies in enabling ethical practices of self-transformation. Drawing on Foucault's notion of "care of the self," Lefebvre turns to some of the most celebrated authors and activists in the history of human rights–such as Mary Wollstonecraft, Henri Bergson, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Charles Malik–to discover a vision of human rights as a tool for individuals to work on, improve, and transform themselves for their own sake. This new perspective allows us to appreciate a crucial dimension of human rights, one that can help us to care for ourselves in light of pressing social and psychological problems, such as loneliness, fear, hatred, patriarchy, meaninglessness, boredom, and indignity.
Categories: Philosophy

Human Rights as a Way of Life

Human Rights as a Way of Life

But my point is that through Bergson we become attuned to a recurrent but mostly implicit preoccupation with self-care and personal transformation which travels throughout the human rights tradition. The second and third lines of ...

Author: Alexandre Lefebvre

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804786454

Category: Philosophy

Page: 216

View: 270

The work of Henri Bergson, the foremost French philosopher of the early twentieth century, is not usually explored for its political dimensions. Indeed, Bergson is best known for his writings on time, evolution, and creativity. This book concentrates instead on his political philosophy—and especially on his late masterpiece, The Two Sources of Morality and Religion—from which Alexandre Lefebvre develops an original approach to human rights. We tend to think of human rights as the urgent international project of protecting all people everywhere from harm. Bergson shows us that human rights can also serve as a medium of personal transformation and self-care. For Bergson, the main purpose of human rights is to initiate all human beings into love. Forging connections between human rights scholarship and philosophy as self-care, Lefebvre uses human rights to channel the whole of Bergson's philosophy.
Categories: Philosophy

Human Rights and the Care of the Self

Human Rights and the Care of the Self

In Human Rights and the Care of the Self Alexandre Lefebvre turns this assumption on its head, showing how the value of human rights also lies in enabling ethical practices of self-transformation.

Author: Alexandre Lefebvre

Publisher:

ISBN: 0822371227

Category: Philosophy

Page: 264

View: 605

Examining human rights discourse from the French Revolution to the present, Alexandre Lefebvre turns common assumptions about human rights--that its main purpose is to enable, protect, and care for those in need--on their heads, showing how the value of human rights lies in its support of ethical self-care.
Categories: Philosophy

The Subject of Human Rights

The Subject of Human Rights

UN General Assembly, Resolution 217 A (III), Universal Declaration of Human Rights, (December 10, 1948), emphasis added ... A fuller account of the authors I discuss below can be found in Lefebvre, Human Rights and the Care of the Self, ...

Author: Danielle Celermajer

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9781503613720

Category: Political Science

Page: 336

View: 508

The Subject of Human Rights is the first book to systematically address the "human" part of "human rights." Drawing on the finest thinking in political theory, cultural studies, history, law, anthropology, and literary studies, this volume examines how human rights—as discourse, law, and practice—shape how we understand humanity and human beings. It asks how the humanness that the human rights idea seeks to protect and promote is experienced. The essays in this volume consider how human rights norms and practices affect the way we relate to ourselves, to other people, and to the nonhuman world. They investigate what kinds of institutions and actors are subjected to human rights and are charged with respecting their demands and realizing their aspirations. And they explore how human rights shape and even create the very subjects they seek to protect. Through critical reflection on these issues, The Subject of Human Rights suggests ways in which we might reimagine the relationship between human rights and subjectivity with a view to benefiting human rights and subjects alike.
Categories: Political Science

Artificial Life After Frankenstein

Artificial Life After Frankenstein

Alexandre Lefebvre, “The Rights of Man and the Care of the Self,” Political Theory, 44:4 (2016), 518–40, especially 522 and 535. Lefebvre aptly places Wollstonecraft at “the very inception of the human rights tradition” but in a broadly ...

Author: Eileen Hunt Botting

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812252743

Category: Political Science

Page: 306

View: 295

Artificial Life After Frankenstein brings the insights born of Mary Shelley's legacy to bear upon the ethics and politics of making artificial life and intelligence in the twenty-first century. What are the obligations of humanity to the artificial creatures we make? And what are the corresponding rights of those creatures, whether they are learning machines or genetically modified organisms? In seeking ways to respond to these questions, so vital for our age of genetic engineering and artificial intelligence, we would do well to turn to the capacious mind and imaginative genius of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (1797-1851). Shelley's novels Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus (1818) and The Last Man (1826) precipitated a modern political strain of science fiction concerned with the ethical dilemmas that arise when we make artificial life—and make life artificial—through science, technology, and other forms of cultural change. In Artificial Life After Frankenstein, Eileen Hunt Botting puts Shelley and several classics of modern political science fiction into dialogue with contemporary political science and philosophy, in order to challenge some of the apocalyptic fears at the fore of twenty-first-century political thought on AI and genetic engineering. Focusing on the prevailing myths that artificial forms of life will end the world, destroy nature, and extinguish love, Botting shows how Shelley modeled ways to break down and transform the meanings of apocalypse, nature, and love in the face of widespread and deep-seated fear about the power of technology and artifice to undermine the possibility of humanity, community, and life itself. Through their explorations of these themes, Mary Shelley and authors of modern political science fiction from H. G. Wells to Nnedi Okorafor have paved the way for a techno-political philosophy of living with the artifice of humanity in all of its complexity. In Artificial Life After Frankenstein, Botting brings the insights born of Shelley's legacy to bear upon the ethics and politics of making artificial life and intelligence in the twenty-first century.
Categories: Political Science

Othering

Othering

79 Rights language is intrinsically transcendental, in the sense that it calls human beings to relate to each other ... This idea has been developed by Lefebvre in Human Rights as a Way of Life and Human Rights and the Care of the Self.

Author: Charles K. Bellinger

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781725254091

Category: Religion

Page: 196

View: 640

Othering is a word used in academic circles, but it may be unfamiliar to many laypersons. This work introduces the word, which is a refined way of describing prejudice, discrimination, and scapegoating. The book addresses what othering is, how it has been practiced in varied contexts, and how it prepares the way for violence. Dimensional anthropology is introduced, which is the idea that there are three main dimensions of reality as it is inhabited by human beings: the vertical axis (the Great Chain of Being), the horizontal plane (society), and individual selfhood. Othering can be present within all three of these dimensions, with slavery being an example of vertical axis othering, ethnic violence being an example of horizontal othering, and lone wolf or psychotic shooters being an example of individual othering. The most thought-provoking aspect of the book for many readers will be its application to the culture wars in our current individualistic age. Rights language is also addressed at length, since it can function as anti-othering rhetoric or as rhetoric that supports othering. The largest framework for the book is its argument that othering is a way of illuminating what the theological tradition has understood as original sin.
Categories: Religion

Christianity and International Law

Christianity and International Law

worship for the simple reason of avoiding a human rights framework that harmonized with Soviet laws and policies. ... Alexandre Lefebvre, Human Rights and the Care of the Self (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2018), 143–52.

Author: Pamela Slotte

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108642958

Category: Law

Page:

View: 709

This cross-disciplinary collaboration offers historical and contemporary scholarship exploring the interface of Christianity and international law. Christianity and International Law aims to understand and move past arguments, narratives and tropes that commonly frame law-religion studies in global governance. Readers are introduced to a range of confessional and critical perspectives explicitly engaging a diverse range of methodological and theoretical orientations to rethink how we experience and find ourselves caught within the phenomena of Christianity and international law.
Categories: Law

Leo Strauss and Contemporary Thought

Leo Strauss and Contemporary Thought

For an affirmative reading of care of self in Foucault and the politics of human rights, see Alexandre Lefebvre, Human Rights and the Care of the Self (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2018). 20. Michel Foucault, The Courage of Truth: ...

Author: Jeffrey A. Bernstein

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9781438483962

Category: Philosophy

Page: 336

View: 112

Broadens the horizons of Strauss’s thought by initiating dialogues between him and figures with whom little or no dialogue has yet occurred. Leo Strauss’s readings of historical figures in the philosophical tradition have been justly well explored; however, his relation to contemporary thinkers has not enjoyed the same coverage. In Leo Strauss and Contemporary Thought, an international group of scholars examines the possible conversations between Strauss and figures such as Walter Benjamin, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Charles Taylor, and Hans Blumenberg. The contributors examine topics including religious liberty, the political function of comedy, law, and the relation between the Ancients and the Moderns, and bring Strauss into many new and original discussions that will be of use to those interested in the thought of Strauss, the history of philosophy and political theory, and contemporary continental thought. Jeffrey A. Bernstein is Professor of Philosophy at the College of the Holy Cross and the author of Leo Strauss on the Borders of Judaism, Philosophy, and History, also published by SUNY Press. Jade Larissa Schiff is Assistant Professor of Politics at Oberlin College and the author of Burdens of Political Responsibility: Narrative and the Cultivation of Responsiveness.
Categories: Philosophy

The Face Mask In COVID Times

The Face Mask In COVID Times

In his book The Care of the Self (Volume 3 of his History of Sexuality), Foucault (1986) emphasised that the ... that are part of care arrangements and practices, as well as the human rights issues of those who need care (Tronto, 1993; ...

Author: Deborah Lupton

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110723717

Category: Social Science

Page: 115

View: 695

The simple fabric face mask is a key agent in the fight against the global spread of COVID-19. However, beyond its role as a protective covering against coronavirus infection, the face mask is the bearer of powerful symbolic and political power and arouses intense emotions. Adopting an international perspective informed by social theory, The Face Mask in COVID Times: A Sociomaterial Analysis offers an intriguing and original investigation of the social, cultural and historical dimensions of face-masking as a practice in the age of COVID. Rather than Beck’s ‘risk society’, we are now living in a ‘COVID society’, the long-term effects of which have yet to be experienced or imagined. Everything has changed. The COVID crisis has generated novel forms of sociality and new ways of living and moving through space and time. In this new world, the face mask has become a significant object, positioned as one of the key ways people can protect themselves and others from infection with the coronavirus. The face mask is rich with symbolic meaning as well as practical value. In the words of theorist Jane Bennett, the face mask has acquired a new ‘thing-power’ as it is coming together with human bodies in these times of uncertainty, illness and death. The role of the face mask in COVID times has been the subject of debate and dissension, arousing strong feelings. The historical and cultural contexts in which face masks against COVID contagion are worn (or not worn) are important to consider. In some countries, such as Japan and other East Asian nations, face mask wearing has a long tradition. Full or partial facial coverings, such as veiling, is common practice in regions such as the Middle East. In many other countries, including most countries in the Global North, most people, beyond health care workers, have little or no experience of face masks. They have had to learn how to make sense of face masking as a protective practice and how to incorporate face masks into their everyday practices and routines. Face masking practices have become highly political. The USA has witnessed protests against face mask wearing that rest on ‘sovereign individualism’, a notion which is highly specific to the contemporary political climate in that country. Face masks have also been worn to make political statements: bearing anti-racist statements, for example, but also Trump campaign support. Meanwhile, celebrities and influencers have sought to advocate for face mask wearing as part of their branding, while art makers, museums, designers and novelty fashion manufacturers have identified the opportunity to profit from this sudden new market. Face masks have become a fashion item as well as a medical device: both a way of signifying the wearer’s individuality and beliefs and their ethical stance in relation to the need to protect their own and others’ health. The Face Mask in COVID Times: A Sociomaterial Analysis provides a short and accessible analysis of the sociomaterial dimensions of the face mask in the age of COVID-19. The book presents seven short chapters and an epilogue. We bring together sociomaterial theoretical perspectives with compelling examples from public health advice and campaigns, anti-mask activism as well as popular culture (news reports, blog posts, videos, online shopping sites, art works) to illustrate our theoretical points, and use Images to support our analysis.
Categories: Social Science

On Vernacular Rights Cultures

On Vernacular Rights Cultures

The Politics of Origins, Human Rights, and Gendered Struggles for Justice Sumi Madhok ... for instance, writes that human rights discourses set in motion an 'ethics of the care of the self ' (Lefebvre 2018: 9), or operations on the self ...

Author: Sumi Madhok

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108832625

Category: Political Science

Page: 280

View: 875

Tracks the critical conceptual vocabularies and the gendered subaltern politics of rights and human rights in South Asia.
Categories: Political Science