Human Biology and Social Inequality

Human Biology and Social Inequality

This volume reviews the current evidence for the strength of such linkages and the biological and social mechanisms that underlie them.

Author: Simon S. Strickland

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521570433

Category: Science

Page: 346

View: 104

Measures of biological variation have long been associated with many indices of social inequality. Data on health, nutrition, fertility, mortality, physical fitness, intellectual performance and a range of heritable biological markers show the ubiquity of such patterns across time, space and population. This volume reviews the current evidence for the strength of such linkages and the biological and social mechanisms that underlie them. A major theme is the relationship between the proximate determinants of these linkages and their longer-term significance for biologically selective social mobility. This book therefore addresses the question of how social stratification mediates processes of natural selection in human groups. Data like this pose difficult and sensitive issues for health policy and developments in this area and in eugenics are reviewed for industrialised and developing countries.
Categories: Science

Urbanism Health and Human Biology in Industrialised Countries

Urbanism  Health and Human Biology in Industrialised Countries

Inequalities in health: the interaction of circumstances and health-related behavior. Sociology of Health and Illness, 17, ... Social Science and Medicine, 44, 809-19. Marks, N. F. (1996). ... In Human Biology of Social Inequality, ed.

Author: L. M. Schell

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521620970

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 330

View: 632

Explores what effects urban living has on human health and behaviour.
Categories: Health & Fitness

Social Information Transmission and Human Biology

Social Information Transmission and Human Biology

This work has stimulated his interest in alternative pathways for the transmission of biological information ... His research interests span a variety of issues including human biology and social inequality, energetics and energy flow ...

Author: Jonathan CK Wells

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 9781420005837

Category: Science

Page: 289

View: 800

Recent research has emphasized that socially transmitted information may affect both the gene pool and the phenotypes of individuals and populations, and that an improved understanding of evolutionary issues is beneficial to those working towards the improvement of human health. Equally, an improved awareness of how human behavior influences health and reproductive fitness is starting to shed new light on the processes that shape the evolution of human behavior and the human mind. Focusing directly on these emerging trends, Social Information Transmission and Human Biology bridges the gap between primarily theoretical work undertaken by those with evolutionary interests and biomedical work undertaken by those dealing with practical issues in human health and demographics. Incorporating papers from a symposium organized under the auspices of the UK Society for the Study of Human Biology, this volume merges the perspectives of internationally renowned evolutionary and theoretical biologists, zoologists, anthropologists, archaeologists, psychologists, and medical researchers whose work is linked by common themes addressing how information is transmitted socially and how its transmission influences both immediate and evolutionary biological outcomes. Emphasizes the diverse ways in which socially transmitted information impacts on human biology To illustrate these themes, the chapters draw on models and data ranging from observations on chimpanzee populations in the wild and on the human archaeological record, to studies of contemporary humans in both developing and industrialized countries. Taking a broad approach, many of the chapters address areas of behavior that are familiar to scientists in particular fields, but do so using a variety of cross-disciplinary perspectives, which will prove stimulating for researchers in a range of academic subject areas, while helping to facilitate closer collaboration between biological and social scientists.
Categories: Science

The Oxford Handbook of Economics and Human Biology

The Oxford Handbook of Economics and Human Biology

Social inequality in premature mortality among Polish urban adults during economic transition. American Journal of Human Biology, 19(6), 878–885. doi:10.1002/ ajhb.20665. Komlos, J. (1998). Shrinking in a growing economy?

Author: John Komlos

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199389292

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 831

View: 588

The Oxford Handbook of Economics and Human Biology enhances understanding of how economic conditions influence human well-being and how human health shapes such economic outcomes as wealth. The volume contains cutting-edge reviews from the major thought leaders in the field.
Categories: Business & Economics

Human Evolutionary Biology

Human Evolutionary Biology

221—238. Schell, L.M. and Czerwinski, S.A. (1998). Environmental health, social inequality and biological differences. In Human Biology and Social Inequality, S. Strickland and P. Shetty (eds). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, ...

Author: Michael P. Muehlenbein

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521879484

Category: Science

Page: 624

View: 134

A wide-ranging and inclusive text focusing on topics in human evolution and the understanding of modern human variation and adaptability.
Categories: Science

Human Biology

Human Biology

Book Reviews Human Biology and Social Inequality , edited by S.S. Strickland and P.S. Shetty . Society for the Study of Human Biology Symposium 39. Cambridge , England : Cambridge University Press , 1998. 346 pp . $ 74.95 .

Author: Raymond Pearl

Publisher:

ISBN: UCSC:32106012367303

Category: Anthropology

Page:

View: 884

Includes section "Recent literature useful in the study of human biology."
Categories: Anthropology

Human Biologists in the Archives

Human Biologists in the Archives

Human Nature 2, 1–30. Farmer, P. (1996). Social inequalities and emerging infectious diseases. Emerging Infectious Diseases 2(4), 259–69. Goodman, A.H. and Leatherman, T.L. (1998). Traversing the chasm between biology and culture: an ...

Author: D. Ann Herring

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139435611

Category: Social Science

Page:

View: 372

Many physical anthropologists study populations using data that come primarily from the historical record. For this volume's authors, the classic anthropological 'field' is not the glamour of an exotic locale, but the sometimes tedium of the dusty back rooms of libraries, archives and museum collections. This book tells of the way in which archival data inform anthropological questions about human biology and health. The authors present a diverse array of human biological evidence from a variety of sources including the archaeological record, medical collections, church records, contemporary health and growth data and genetic information from the descendants of historical populations. The papers demonstrate how the analysis of historical documents expands the horizons of research in human biology, extends the longitudinal analysis of microevolutionary and social processes into the present and enhances our understanding of the human condition.
Categories: Social Science

Challenging Inequities in Health

Challenging Inequities in Health

Environmental health, social inequality and biological differences. In: Strickland S.S., Shetty P.S. (eds), Human Biology and Social Inequality. 39th Symposium volume of the Society for the Study of Human Biology.

Author: Timothy Evans

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195137408

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 348

View: 317

This text provides a unique view of global inequities in health status and health sytems. Emphasizing socioeconomic conditions, it combines chapters on conceptual and measurement issues with case studies from around the world.
Categories: Health & Fitness

Social Inequalities in Health in Nonhuman Primates

Social Inequalities in Health in Nonhuman Primates

This book provides a comprehensive look at nonhuman primate social inequalities as models for health differences associated with socioeconomic status in humans.

Author: Carol A. Shively

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319308722

Category: Science

Page: 178

View: 275

This book provides a comprehensive look at nonhuman primate social inequalities as models for health differences associated with socioeconomic status in humans. The benefit of the socially-housed monkey model is that it provides the complexity of hierarchical structure and rank affiliation, i.e. both negative and positive aspects of social status. At the same time, nonhuman primates are more amenable to controlled experiments and more invasive studies that can be used in human beings to examine the effects of low status on brain development, neuroendocrine function, immunity, and eating behavior. Because all of these biological and behavioral substrates form the underpinnings of human illness, and are likely shared among primates, the nonhuman primate model can significantly advance our understanding of the best interventions in humans.
Categories: Science

The Oxford Handbook of Economics and Human Biology

The Oxford Handbook of Economics and Human Biology

The Oxford Handbook of Economics and Human Biology provides an extensive and insightful overview of how economic conditions affect human well-being and how human health influences economic outcomes.

Author: Dr. John Komlos

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190631659

Category: Business & Economics

Page:

View: 205

The Oxford Handbook of Economics and Human Biology provides an extensive and insightful overview of how economic conditions affect human well-being and how human health influences economic outcomes. Among the topics explored are how variations in height, whether over time, among different socio-economic groups, and in different locations, are important indicators of changes in economic growth and economic development, levels of economic inequality, and economic opportunities for individuals. The book covers a broad geographic range: Africa, Latin and North America, Asia, and Europe. Its temporal scope ranges from the late Iron Age to the present. Taking advantage of recent improvements in data and economic methods, the book also explores how humans' biological conditions influence and are influenced by their economic circumstances, including poverty. Among the issues addressed are how height, body mass index (BMI), and obesity can affect and are affected by productivity, wages, and wealth. How family environment affects health and well-being is examined, as is the importance of both pre-birth and early childhood conditions for subsequent economic outcomes. Reflecting this dynamic and expanding area of research, the volume shows that well-being is a salient aspect of economics, and the new toolkit of evidence from biological living standards enhances understanding of industrialization, commercialization, income distribution, the organization of health care, social status, and the redistributive state affect such human attributes as physical stature, weight, and the obesity epidemic in historical and contemporary populations.
Categories: Business & Economics