A Hugh Henry Brackenridge Reader 1770 1815

A Hugh Henry Brackenridge Reader  1770 1815

A collection of the work of Hugh Henry Brackenridge (1748-1816)-one of the most vigorous and prolific writers of his time.

Author: Daniel Marder

Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Pre

ISBN: 9780822975786

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 420

View: 864

A collection of the work of Hugh Henry Brackenridge (1748-1816)-one of the most vigorous and prolific writers of his time. An ardent believer in an educated public, his efforts to implant the ideals of democracy in early America made him a legend on the frontier. This selection of his work captures the essence of the man and his time, and includes writing published in the United States Magazine, Pittsburgh Gazette, as well as his narrative on the Whiskey Rebellion, Incidents of the Insurrection.
Categories: Literary Collections

After the Revolution Profiles of Early American Culture

After the Revolution  Profiles of Early American Culture

Daniel Marder has edited A Hugh Henry Brackenridge Reader, 1770-1815 (Pittsburgh, 1970); Marder's Hugh Henry Brackenridge ( New York, 1967 ) is the most ...

Author: Joseph J. Ellis

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393072303

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 344

Through portraits of four figures—Charles Willson Peale, Hugh Henry Brackenridge, William Dunlap, and Noah Webster—Joseph Ellis provides a unique perspective on the role of culture in post-Revolutionary America, both its high expectations and its frustrations. Each life is fascinating in its own right, and each is used to brightly illuminate the historical context.
Categories: History

Transformable Race

Transformable Race

Hugh Henry Brackenridge, “Thoughts on the Enfranchisement of the Negroes,” 1779, in A Hugh Henry Brackenridge Reader: 17701815, ed.

Author: Katy L. Chiles

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199313501

Category: History

Page: 315

View: 394

Focusing on writers such as Phillis Wheatley, Benjamin Franklin, Samson Occum, Charles Brockden Brown, and others, Transformable Race tells the story of how early Americans imagined, contributed to, and challenged the ways that one's racial identity could be formed in the time of the nation's founding.
Categories: History

American Literature Before 1880

American Literature Before 1880

BRACKENRIDGE, Hugh Henry (1748–1816), was born in Kintyre, a southwestern headland of Scotland, ... A Hugh Henry Brackenridge Reader, 17701815 (1970).

Author: Robert Lawson-Peebles

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317870371

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 352

View: 974

American Literature Before 1880 attempts to place its subject in the broadest possible international perspective. It begins with Homer looking westward, and ends with Henry James crossing the Atlantic eastwards. In between, the book examines the projection of images of the East onto an as-yet unrecognised West; the cultural consequences of Viking, Colombian, and then English migration to America; the growth and independence of the British American colonies; the key writers of the new Republic; and the development of the culture of the United States before and after the Civil War. It is intended both as an introduction for undergraduates to the richness and variety of American Literature, and as a contribution to the debate about its distinctive nature. The book therefore begins with a lengthy survey of earlier histories of American Literature.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Writing and Postcolonialism in the Early Republic

Writing and Postcolonialism in the Early Republic

Brackenridge , Hugh Henry . Modern Chivalry . 1792–1815 . Rpt . , ed . Claude M. Newlin . New York : Hafner , 1937 . A Brackenridge Reader , 1770-1815 .

Author: Edward Watts

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 0813917611

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 225

View: 291

Writing and Postcolonialism in the Early Republic is the first book-length analysis of early American literature through the lens of postcolonial theory. Although the United States represented a colonizing presence that displaced indigenous peoples and exported imperial culture, American colonists also found themselves exiled, often exploited and abused by the distant metropolitan center. In this innovative book, Edward Watts demonstrates how American post-Revolutionary literature exhibits characteristics of a postcolonial society.The author identifies six texts that particularly exhibit postcolonial qualities: Irving's Knickerbocker's History of New York, Brown's Arthur Mervyn, Murray's The Gleaner, Brackenridge's Modern Chivalry, Tyler's The Algerine Captive, and Watterston's The Lawyer. In each of these books a fictional protagonist attempts to write about the American experience using the language and genres left over from the colonial period. As the fictional authors fail, Watts suggests,we see the,real authors challenging and subverting the lingering colonial culture and its centrality to republican versions of the new nation. In the terms of contemporary postcolonial scholarship from Australia, Canada, and New Zealand, these early American authors worked to decolonize American writing by freeing it from vestigial British conventions.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Embattled Bench

Embattled Bench

... PMHB , 7 ( 1883 ) , 148 ; Hugh Henry Brackenridge , " The Trial of Mamachtaga , " in Daniel Marder , ed . , A Hugh Henry Brackenridge Reader , 17701815 ...

Author: Gail Stuart Rowe

Publisher: University of Delaware Press

ISBN: 0874135265

Category: Political Science

Page: 366

View: 904

"This work is the first intensive, scholarly study of the early Pennsylvania Supreme Court. Moreover, it is the first investigation of an early American court from the perspective of broad developments within early society. As such it provides the first serious look at a judicial institution shaping the community within which it functioned and being shaped in turn by forces and developments within that society. The book traces the evolution of the personnel, proceedings, and language of the Pennsylvania high court from its founding in May 1684 to its restructuring under the judicial reforms of 1809." "Rowe thoroughly demonstrates an important change in the court's institutional focus during the American Revolution when the court exhibited both an enhanced interest in the outcome of government prosecutions and a greater concern for the rights of individuals facing criminal charges. The growth of the court's powers are traced as are its accomplishments over time, especially after 1778. Also demonstrated is the process by which the court challenged the executive and legislative branches for authority within the state. Accordingly, the work describes the court's move toward the exercise of judicial review prior to Marshall's landmark Marbury v. Madison (1803) ruling and the course by which the high bench came to be viewed by many as an aristocratic forum, a menace and a barrier to the growth of democracy in Pennsylvania. Rowe examines the steps taken by popular forces in the early nineteenth century to diminish the court's impact and influence, as well as the attempts to remove or intimidate the court's judges." "The importance of this work lies in its evaluation of the court's impact on early Pennsylvanians, white and nonwhite, free and unfree, male and female, young and old, rich and poor. Also documented are the changing role of the court in politics and the evolution of the court's personnel toward greater professionalism. Finally, this book carefully traces the mounting conflict centering on the court as its values and practices increasingly came into conflict with the democratic forces, aspirations, and developments within the state."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Categories: Political Science

Avenging the People

Avenging the People

... on the Indian War," KG, June 2, 1792; see also Hugh Henry Brackendridge, “Modern Chivalry” [1792], in A Hugh Henry Brackenridge Reader, 17701815, ed.

Author: J. M. Opal

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199751709

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 882

"With the passionate support of most voters and their families, Andrew Jackson broke through the protocols of the Founding generation, defying constitutional and international norms in the name of the "sovereign people." And yet Jackson's career was no less about limiting that sovereignty, imposing one kind of law over Americans so that they could inflict his sort of "justice" on non-Americans. Jackson made his name along the Carolina and Tennessee frontiers by representing merchants and creditors and serving governors and judges. At times that meant ejecting white squatters from native lands and returning blacks slaves to native planters. Jackson performed such duties in the name of federal authority and the "law of nations." Yet he also survived an undeclared war with Cherokee and Creek fighters between 1792 and 1794, raging at the Washington administration's failure to "avenge the blood" of white colonists who sometimes leaned towards the Spanish Empire rather than the United States. Even under the friendlier presidency of Thomas Jefferson, Jackson chafed at the terms of national loyalty. During the long war in the south and west from 1811 to 1818 he repeatedly brushed aside state and federal restraints on organized violence, citing his deeper obligations to the people's safety within a terrifying world of hostile empires, lurking warriors, and rebellious slaves. By 1819 white Americans knew him as their "great avenger." Drawing from recent literatures on Jackson and the early republic and also from new archival sources, Avenging the People portrays him as a peculiar kind of nationalist for a particular form of nation, a grim and principled man whose grim principles made Americans fearsome in some respects and helpless in others"--
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Federalist Frontier

The Federalist Frontier

Henry Clay. 2 vols. New York: Robert P. Bixby & Co., 1843. Marder, Daniel, ed. A Hugh Henry Brackenridge Reader, 17701815.

Author: Kristopher Maulden

Publisher: University of Missouri Press

ISBN: 9780826274397

Category: History

Page: 300

View: 314

The Federalist Frontier traces the development of Federalist policies and the Federalist Party in the first three states of the Northwest Territory—Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois—from the nation’s first years until the rise of the Second Party System in the 1820s and 1830s. Relying on government records, private correspondence, and newspapers, Kristopher Maulden argues that Federalists originated many of the policies and institutions that helped the young United States government take a leading role in the American people’s expansion and settlement westward across the Appalachians. It was primarily they who placed the U.S. Army at the fore of the white westward movement, created and executed the institutions to survey and sell public lands, and advocated for transportation projects to aid commerce and further migration into the region. Ultimately, the relationship between government and settlers evolved as citizens raised their expectations of what the federal government should provide, and the region embraced transportation infrastructure and innovation in public education. Historians of early American politics will have a chance to read about Federalists in the Northwest, and they will see the early American state in action in fighting Indians, shaping settler understandings of space and social advancement, and influencing political ideals among the citizens. For historians of the early American West, Maulden’s work demonstrates that the origins of state-led expansion reach much further back in time than generally understood.
Categories: History

The Fourth of July

The Fourth of July

... Hugh Henry , “ Oration on the Celebration of the Anniversary of Independence , July 4th , 1793 , ” A Hugh Henry Brackenridge Reader , 1770-1815 , ed .

Author: Paul Goetsch

Publisher: Gunter Narr Verlag

ISBN: 3823344846

Category: American literature

Page: 307

View: 479

Categories: American literature

The Literary Quest for an American National Character

The Literary Quest for an American National Character

Richard Henry Lee renewed the question simultaneous with the resolution on ... Daniel Marder, A Hugh Henry Brackenridge Reader 17701815 (Pittsburgh: ...

Author: Finn Pollard

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135892661

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 381

"What then is the American, this new man?" This question is explored here through the lives and writings of a sequence of imaginative authors each of whom confronted a crucial moment in the evolution of the new nation (from Crevecoeur and the Revolution, through Washington Irving and Jeffersonian Democracy, to James Fenimore Cooper and the Era of Good Feelings). At the centre of these confrontations was a division between those who claimed national perfection had been obtained, and those who, while desperately wanting to believe this, perceived all too clearly that that perfection had not yet come. Rediscovering this neglected literary debate, The Literary Quest for an American National Character illuminates afresh the traumatic birth and development of the new American nation.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Prodigals and Pilgrims

Prodigals and Pilgrims

It was , for example , along with Doddridge's writings , Patrick Henry's ... A Hugh Henry Brackenridge Reader , 1770-1815 ( University of Pittsburgh Press ...

Author: Jay Fliegelman

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521317266

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 328

View: 743

The author traces a constellation of intimately related ideas - about the nature of parental authority and filial rights, of moral obligation of Scripture, of the growth of the mind and the nature of historical progress - from their most important English and continental expressions in a variety of literary and theological texts, to their transmission, reception and application in Revolutionary America and in the early national period of American culture.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Ulster to America

Ulster to America

Hugh Henry Brackenridge, “Cursory Remarks on the Federal Constitution,” in Daniel Marder, ed., A Hugh Henry Brackenridge Reader, 17701815 (Pittsburgh: ...

Author: Warren R. Hofstra

Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press

ISBN: 9781572338326

Category: History

Page: 292

View: 971

In Ulster to America: The Scots-Irish Migration Experience, 1680–1830, editor Warren R. Hofstra has gathered contributions from pioneering scholars who are rewriting the history of the Scots-Irish. In addition to presenting fresh information based on thorough and detailed research, they offer cutting-edge interpretations that help explain the Scots-Irish experience in the United States. In place of implacable Scots-Irish individualism, the writers stress the urge to build communities among Ulster immigrants. In place of rootlessness and isolation, the authors point to the trans-Atlantic continuity of Scots-Irish settlement and the presence of Germans and Anglo-Americans in so-called Scots-Irish areas. In a variety of ways, the book asserts, the Scots-Irish actually modified or abandoned some of their own cultural traits as a result of interacting with people of other backgrounds and in response to many of the main themes defining American history. While the Scots-Irish myth has proved useful over time to various groups with their own agendas—including modern-day conservatives and fundamentalist Christians—this book, by clearing away long-standing but erroneous ideas about the Scots-Irish, represents a major advance in our understanding of these immigrants. It also places Scots-Irish migration within the broader context of the historiographical construct of the Atlantic world. Organized in chronological and migratory order, this volume includes contributions on specific U.S. centers for Ulster immigrants: New Castle, Delaware; Donegal Springs, Pennsylvania; Carlisle, Pennsylvania; Opequon, Virginia; the Virginia frontier; the Carolina backcountry; southwestern Pennsylvania, and Kentucky. Ulster to America is essential reading for scholars and students of American history, immigration history, local history, and the colonial era, as well as all those who seek a fuller understanding of the Scots-Irish immigrant story.
Categories: History

A Companion to American Fiction 1780 1865

A Companion to American Fiction  1780   1865

... Revolution is Hugh Henry Brackenridge's Modern Chivalry (1792-1815). ... readers are forced to contemplate the chaotic disorder consequent on the ...

Author: Shirley Samuels

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780470999202

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 488

View: 764

This Companion presents the current state of criticism in the field of American fiction from the earliest declarations of nationhood to secession and civil war. Draws heavily on historical and cultural contexts in its consideration of American fiction Relates the fiction of the period to conflicts about territory and sovereignty and to issues of gender, race, ethnicity and identity Covers different forms of fiction, including children’s literature, sketches, polemical pieces, historical romances, Gothic novels and novels of exploration Considers both canonical and lesser-known authors, including James Fennimore Cooper, Hannah Foster, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville and Harriet Beecher Stowe Treats neglected topics, such as the Western novel, science and the novel, and American fiction in languages other than English
Categories: Literary Criticism

The American Counterrevolution

The American Counterrevolution

... Hugh Henry Brackenridge ( New York : Twayne Publishers , 1967 ) , 17–31 ; Daniel Marder , ed . , A Hugh Henry Brackenridge Reader , 17701815 ...

Author: Larry E. Tise

Publisher: Stackpole Books

ISBN: 081170100X

Category: History

Page: 634

View: 537

A refutation of virtually the entire historiography surrounding the outcomes of the Revolution, this epic narrative traces the shift from the ideas of liberty to the politics of order during the difficult period between 1783 and1800. 70 illustrations.
Categories: History

For Fear of an Elective King

For Fear of an Elective King

A Hugh Henry Brackenridge Reader, 17701815 (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press,1970), 56–59, 3–46. 54. William Smith, “An Oration, ...

Author: Kathleen Bartoloni-Tuazon

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801471919

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 264

View: 121

In the spring of 1789, the Senate and House of Representatives fell into dispute regarding how to address the president. For Fear of an Elective King is Kathleen Bartoloni-Tuazon's rich account of the title controversy and its meanings.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Common Bondage

Common Bondage

2, 1786; repr. in A Hugh Henry Brackenridge Reader, 17701815, ed. Daniel Marder (Pittsburgh: Univ. of Pittsburgh Press, 1970), 117. 5.

Author: Peter A. Dorsey

Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press

ISBN: 9781572336711

Category: History

Page: 276

View: 281

“This is a brilliant book that I believe will make a very valuable and original contribution to the way scholars understand the use of language in the era of the American Revolution and the origin and limited nature of Revolutionary era anti-slavery sentiment.” —Robert Olwell, author of Master, Slaves, and Subjects: The Culture of Power in the South Carolina Low Country, 1740–1790 In the American revolutionary era, the antislavery rhetoric of certain founding fathers often took on a life of its own. The distinctions they drew between the British imperial order and the bright dawn of liberty in a new American republic seemed, at times, to compel the freedom of the slaves as well as the freedom of white colonists. But Peter A. Dorsey shows that this rhetoric was often more strategic than principled, and he argues that understanding this ploy helps to explain why an early antislavery movement failed to achieve its goals once the American Revolution was over. In Common Bondage, Dorsey examines how patriots and those who opposed them understood slavery within a broader tradition of revolutionary thought. Especially prominent in the rhetoric and reality of the eighteenth century, this fluid concept was applied to a wide variety of events and values and was constantly being redefined. Dorsey explains the classical meaning of rhetoric as “to persuade” but notes that it can also mean “to mask” or “to mislead.” He shows how these different senses of the word merged, as revolutionary rhetoric was used to achieve limited ends. By examining the figurative extension of slavery in revolutionary rhetoric, Dorsey recaptures the transforming energy of the ideas it promoted and points toward a better understanding of the regressive aftermath. The resulting composite psychology of the slave-holding culture that existed during the country's formative years allows us to better trace the development of American racism. Peter A. Dorsey is the chair of the English Department at Mt. Saint Mary's University in Emmitsburg, Maryland. He is the author of Sacred Estrangement: The Rhetoric of Conversion in Modern American Autobiography.
Categories: History

Quixotic Fictions of the USA 1792 1815

Quixotic Fictions of the USA 1792 1815

... Hugh Henry Brackenridge ( New York : Twayne , 1967 ) ed . , A Hugh Henry Brackenridge Reader , 1770-1815 ( Pittsburgh : University of Pittsburgh Press ...

Author: Sarah F. Wood

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191515167

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 314

View: 975

Quixotic Fictions of the USA 1792-1815 explores the conflicted and conflicting interpretations of Don Quixote available to and deployed by disenchanted writers of America's new republic. It argues that the legacy of Don Quixote provided an ambiguous cultural icon and ironic narrative stance that enabled authors to critique with impunity the ideological fictions shoring up their fractured republic. Close readings of works such as Modern Chivalry, Female Quixotism, and The Algerine Captive reveal that the fiction from this period repeatedly engaged with Cervantes's narrative in order to test competing interpretations of republicanism, to interrogate the new republic's multivalent crises of authority, and to question both the possibility and the desirability of an isolationist USA and an autonomous 'American' literature. Sarah Wood's study is the first book-length publication to examine the role of Don Quixote in early American literature. Exploring the extent to which the literary culture of North America was shaped by a diverse range of influences, it addresses an issue of growing concern to scholars of American history and literature. Quixotic Fictions reaffirms the global reach of Cervantes's influence and explores the complex, contradictory ways in which Don Quixote helped shape American fiction at a formative moment in its development.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Fourth of July and the Founding of America

The Fourth of July and the Founding of America

... Hugh Henry Brackenridge, 'Oration on the Celebration of the Anniversary of Independence, July 4th, 1793', in A Hugh Henry Brackenridge Reader, 17701815 ...

Author: Peter De Bolla

Publisher: ABRAMS

ISBN: 9781468306033

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 926

A history of the holiday and an “elegant, ironic, brief but deeply researched meditation on what makes America America” (Financial Times). Holidays of all sorts are celebrated in the United States, many rooted in the country’s great diversity of ethnicities, religions, and cultures. But one day unites all Americans: the Fourth of July. Every year, Independence Day revelers mark the founding of the nation with picnics and parades, flag-waving and fireworks displays. But in fact, much of the inherited lore that surrounds the Fourth is myth and legend, not history. Even the date of the holiday is misleading, as the Declaration of Independence was in fact penned on the second of July. Jefferson did not write it himself, nor was it intended to mark the birth of a new nation. In this remarkable work of research and narrative, Peter de Bolla teases out the true story of the Fourth of July—and traces the holiday’s history from 1776 through the Civil War, the Cold War, and the present.
Categories: History

The American Novel to 1870

The American Novel to 1870

... novels by Hugh Henry Brackenridge (Modern Chivalry [1792–1815]), ... the six he chooses may surprise many readers: Brown, Cooper, Hawthorne, Simms, ...

Author: J. Gerald Kennedy

Publisher: Oxford History of the Novel in

ISBN: 9780195385359

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 640

View: 553

The American Revolution and the Civil War bracket roughly eight decades of formative change in a republic created in 1776 by a gesture that was both rhetorical and performative. The subsequent construction of U.S. national identity influenced virtually all art forms, especially prose fiction,until internal conflict disrupted the project of nation-building. This volume reassesses, in an authoritative way, the principal forms and features of the emerging American novel. It will include chapters on: the beginnings of the novel in the US; the novel and nation-building; the publishing industry; leading novelists of Antebellum America; eminent early American novels; cultural influences on the novel; and subgenres within the novel form during this period. This book isthe first of the three proposed US volumes that will make up Oxford's ambitious new eleven-volume literary resource, The Oxford History of the Novel in English (OHONE), a venture being commissioned and administered on both sides of the Atlantic.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Imagined Empires

Imagined Empires

A Hugh Henry Brackenridge Reader : 1770-1815 . Pittsburgh : University of Pittsburgh Press , 1970 . Marmontel , J. F. The Incas , or , The destruction of ...

Author: Eric Wertheimer

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521622298

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 243

View: 160

A 1999 study of the influence of South American culture on early American culture, in particular literature.
Categories: Literary Criticism