How to Lie with Maps, Third Edition

Author: Mark Monmonier

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022643608X

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 256

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An instant classic when first published in 1991, How to Lie with Maps revealed how the choices mapmakers make—consciously or unconsciously—mean that every map inevitably presents only one of many possible stories about the places it depicts. The principles Mark Monmonier outlined back then remain true today, despite significant technological changes in the making and use of maps. The introduction and spread of digital maps and mapping software, however, have added new wrinkles to the ever-evolving landscape of modern mapmaking. ​Fully updated for the digital age, this new edition of How to Lie with Maps examines the myriad ways that technology offers new opportunities for cartographic mischief, deception, and propaganda. While retaining the same brevity, range, and humor as its predecessors, this third edition includes significant updates throughout as well as new chapters on image maps, prohibitive cartography, and online maps. It also includes an expanded section of color images and an updated list of sources for further reading.
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How to Lie with Maps

Author: Mark Monmonier

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022602900X

Category: Science

Page: 222

View: 1129

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Originally published to wide acclaim, this lively, cleverly illustrated essay on the use and abuse of maps teaches us how to evaluate maps critically and promotes a healthy skepticism about these easy-to-manipulate models of reality. Monmonier shows that, despite their immense value, maps lie. In fact, they must. The second edition is updated with the addition of two new chapters, 10 color plates, and a new foreword by renowned geographer H. J. de Blij. One new chapter examines the role of national interest and cultural values in national mapping organizations, including the United States Geological Survey, while the other explores the new breed of multimedia, computer-based maps. To show how maps distort, Monmonier introduces basic principles of mapmaking, gives entertaining examples of the misuse of maps in situations from zoning disputes to census reports, and covers all the typical kinds of distortions from deliberate oversimplifications to the misleading use of color. "Professor Monmonier himself knows how to gain our attention; it is not in fact the lies in maps but their truth, if always approximate and incomplete, that he wants us to admire and use, even to draw for ourselves on the facile screen. His is an artful and funny book, which like any good map, packs plenty in little space."—Scientific American "A useful guide to a subject most people probably take too much for granted. It shows how map makers translate abstract data into eye-catching cartograms, as they are called. It combats cartographic illiteracy. It fights cartophobia. It may even teach you to find your way. For that alone, it seems worthwhile."—Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, The New York Times ". . . witty examination of how and why maps lie. [The book] conveys an important message about how statistics of any kind can be manipulated. But it also communicates much of the challenge, aesthetic appeal, and sheer fun of maps. Even those who hated geography in grammar school might well find a new enthusiasm for the subject after reading Monmonier's lively and surprising book."—Wilson Library Bulletin "A reading of this book will leave you much better defended against cheap atlases, shoddy journalism, unscrupulous advertisers, predatory special-interest groups, and others who may use or abuse maps at your expense."—John Van Pelt, Christian Science Monitor "Monmonier meets his goal admirably. . . . [His] book should be put on every map user's 'must read' list. It is informative and readable . . . a big step forward in helping us to understand how maps can mislead their readers."—Jeffrey S. Murray, Canadian Geographic
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Mapping It Out

Expository Cartography for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Author: Mark Monmonier

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226534176

Category: Reference

Page: 301

View: 4992

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Monmonier shows authors and scholars how they can use expository cartography--the visual, two-dimensional organization of information--to heighten the impact of their books and articles. A concise, practical book that introduces the fundamental principles of graphic logic and design. 112 maps. 1 halftone.
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British Images of Germany

Admiration, Antagonism & Ambivalence, 1860-1914

Author: R. Scully

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137283467

Category: History

Page: 395

View: 1816

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British Images of Germany is the first full-length cultural history of Britain's relationship with Germany in the key period leading up to the First World War. Richard Scully reassesses what is imagined to be a fraught relationship, illuminating the sense of kinship Britons felt for Germany even in times of diplomatic tension.
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Geographic Information

Author: Jenny Marie Johnson

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9781573563925

Category: Reference

Page: 216

View: 9133

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Explores geographic information available through several sources including the Internet and satellite technology, covering such topics as map basics, geographic information systems, and geographical standards.
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Lived Topographies and Their Mediational Forces

Author: Gary Backhaus,John Murungi

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9780739105764

Category: Travel

Page: 225

View: 2441

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This collection explores the various forms of narrative, semiotic, and technological mediation that shape the experience of place. Gary Backhaus and John Murungi have assembled a wide array of scholars who give a unique perspective on the phenomenology of place.
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Rhumb Lines and Map Wars

A Social History of the Mercator Projection

Author: Mark Monmonier

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226534329

Category: Science

Page: 256

View: 5942

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In Rhumb Lines and Map Wars, Mark Monmonier offers an insightful, richly illustrated account of the controversies surrounding Flemish cartographer Gerard Mercator's legacy. He takes us back to 1569, when Mercator announced a clever method of portraying the earth on a flat surface, creating the first projection to take into account the earth's roundness. As Monmonier shows, mariners benefited most from Mercator's projection, which allowed for easy navigation of the high seas with rhumb lines—clear-cut routes with a constant compass bearing—for true direction. But the projection's popularity among nineteenth-century sailors led to its overuse—often in inappropriate, non-navigational ways—for wall maps, world atlases, and geopolitical propaganda. Because it distorts the proportionate size of countries, the Mercator map was criticized for inflating Europe and North America in a promotion of colonialism. In 1974, German historian Arno Peters proffered his own map, on which countries were ostensibly drawn in true proportion to one another. In the ensuing "map wars" of the 1970s and 1980s, these dueling projections vied for public support—with varying degrees of success. Widely acclaimed for his accessible, intelligent books on maps and mapping, Monmonier here examines the uses and limitations of one of cartography's most significant innovations. With informed skepticism, he offers insightful interpretations of why well-intentioned clerics and development advocates rallied around the Peters projection, which flagrantly distorted the shape of Third World nations; why journalists covering the controversy ignored alternative world maps and other key issues; and how a few postmodern writers defended the Peters worldview with a self-serving overstatement of the power of maps. Rhumb Lines and Map Wars is vintage Monmonier: historically rich, beautifully written, and fully engaged with the issues of our time.
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Mapping Eastern Europe

Author: Jörn Happel,Christophe v Werdt,Mira Jovanović

Publisher: LIT Verlag Münster

ISBN: 3643800150

Category: History

Page: 364

View: 8125

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Karten sind erstklassige historische Quellen, doch werden sie in der Geschichtswissenschaft nur selten genutzt. Gerade die Kartierung Osteuropas lÃ?¤sst Historiker Einblick nehmen in die Geschichte der Nationalisierung oder Verwissenschaftlichung, in Debatten Ã?Â1⁄4ber Ethnisierung oder in Raum- und Grenzfragen. Die Karten erzÃ?¤hlen von Raumphantasien, von Homogenisierungsversuchen in VielvÃ?¶lkerreichen, sie behandeln Grenzen und GrenzÃ?Â1⁄4berschreitungen einzelner Menschen im erdachten und gezeichneten sowie im realen osteuropÃ?¤ischen GroÃ?Â?raum.
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Patents and Cartographic Inventions

A New Perspective for Map History

Author: Mark Monmonier

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319510401

Category: Social Science

Page: 267

View: 3050

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This book explores the US patent system, which helped practical minded innovators establish intellectual property rights and fulfill the need for achievement that motivates inventors and scholars alike. In this sense, the patent system was a parallel literature: a vetting institution similar to the conventional academic-scientific-technical journal insofar as the patent examiner was both editor and peer reviewer, while the patent attorney was a co-author or ghost writer. In probing evolving notions of novelty, non-obviousness, and cumulative innovation, Mark Monmonier examines rural address guides, folding schemes, world map projections, diverse improvements of the terrestrial globe, mechanical route-following machines that anticipated the GPS navigator, and the early electrical you-are-here mall map, which opened the way for digital cartography and provided fodder for patent trolls, who treat the patent largely as a license to litigate.
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Geography Speaks

Performative Aspects of Geography

Author: Robert E. Sullivan

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9781409420095

Category: Social Science

Page: 189

View: 3152

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Geography Speaks is an investigation of how geography is informed by speech act theory and performativity, focusing on five key aspects of the geographical discipline. Starting with a critical analysis of how J.L. Austin's speech act theory probed the permeability between fact and fiction, it then assesses oppositional interpretations by John Searle and Jacques Derrida. This is an interdisciplinary text with a distinct and clear focus on cultural geography.
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