How Racism and Sexism Killed Traditional Media: Why the Future of Journalism Depends on Women and People of Color

Why the Future of Journalism Depends on Women and People of Color

Author: Joshunda Sanders

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1440830827

Category: Social Science

Page: 186

View: 8260

An evaluative examination that challenges the media to rise above the systematic racism and sexism that persists across all channels, despite efforts to integrate. • Gives a thorough background on the history of minority-produced media • Highlights ideas for improving hiring practices and coverage for minorities • Identifies the growing number of news consumers who are people of color • Provides a chronology of diversity efforts in legacy newsrooms • Includes material derived from interviews with experts like Dori J. Maynard with the Maynard Institute for Journalism Education and veteran journalists like Ellis Cose and Danyel Smith
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We Were Feminists Once

From Riot Grrrl to CoverGirl®, the Buying and Selling of a Political Movement

Author: Andi Zeisler

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 1610395905

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 4685

Feminism has hit the big time. Once a dirty word brushed away with a grimace, "feminist" has been rebranded as a shiny label sported by movie and pop stars, fashion designers, and multi-hyphenate powerhouses like Beyoncé. It drives advertising and marketing campaigns for everything from wireless plans to underwear to perfume, presenting what's long been a movement for social justice as just another consumer choice in a vast market. Individual self-actualization is the goal, shopping more often than not the means, and celebrities the mouthpieces. But what does it mean when social change becomes a brand identity? Feminism's splashy arrival at the center of today's media and pop-culture marketplace, after all, hasn't offered solutions to the movement's unfinished business. Planned Parenthood is under sustained attack, women are still paid 77 percent-or less-of the man's dollar, and vicious attacks on women, both on- and offline, are utterly routine. Andi Zeisler, a founding editor of Bitch Media, draws on more than twenty years' experience interpreting popular culture in this biting history of how feminism has been co-opted, watered down, and turned into a gyratory media trend. Surveying movies, television, advertising, fashion, and more, Zeisler reveals a media landscape brimming with the language of empowerment, but offering little in the way of transformational change. Witty, fearless, and unflinching, We Were Feminists Once is the story of how we let this happen, and how we can amplify feminism's real purpose and power.
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Consumer Equality: Race and the American Marketplace

Race and the American Marketplace

Author: Geraldine Rosa Henderson,Anne-Marie Hakstian,Jerome D. Williams

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 144083377X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 194

View: 7354

This book provides a vivid examination of the issue of consumer inequality in America—one of society's most under-discussed and critical issues—through the evaluation of real-life cases, the trend of consumers suing companies for discrimination, and the application of novel frameworks to establish legitimate consumer equality. • Provides insights from three of the recognized leading authorities in the field who have collaborated extensively in conducting research on marketplace discrimination • Considers a wide array of lawsuits that document the growing trend of consumers taking companies to court for discrimination and examines the results of these legal cases to draw conclusions that will interest attorneys for plaintiffs and defendants in marketplace discrimination cases, consumer advocates, and public policymakers responsible for amending legislation to address issues of marketplace discrimination • Analyzes national crime reporting databases to gain insight into how law enforcement in the marketplace impacts various racial-ethnic communities
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The School-to-Prison Pipeline: Education, Discipline, and Racialized Double Standards

Education, Discipline, and Racialized Double Standards

Author: Nancy A. Heitzeg

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1440831122

Category: Social Science

Page: 178

View: 6257

This book offers a research and comparison-driven look at the school-to-prison pipeline, its racial dynamics, the connections to mass incarceration, and our flawed educational climate—and suggests practical remedies for change. • Provides readers with an understanding of the realities of the school-to-prison pipeline—its history, development, and racialized context and meaning—as well as the continued significance of race and other socially differentiating factors in shaping public policy and everyday decisions regarding "deviance," "discipline," and social control • Examines the under-explored dynamic that places a predominantly white teaching staff in schools that are predominantly schools of color, and considers the roles that stereotypes and cultural conflicts play in the labeling of students • Suggests viable options for action towards dismantling the institutionalized racism revealed by the school-to-prison pipeline via both policy reforms and transformational alternatives • Presents information relevant to a range of college courses, such as education, sociology of deviance, sociology of education, youth studies, legal studies, criminal justice, and racial/ethnic studies
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The Beautiful Darkness

A Handbook for Orphans

Author: Joshunda Sanders

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781537402024

Category:

Page: 160

View: 9890

The Beautiful Darkness focuses on author Joshunda Sanders' three-year journey through loss, grief and solitude, which led to reconciliation, forgiveness, and ultimately healing. The Beautiful Darkness, her candid memoir, begins in 2010 with a phone call that informs her that her father has died by suicide. It is the first of many events that transform her life dramatically for the next three years. To understand the present, she looks to her past. Sanders vividly recalls living in multiple homeless shelters with her mentally ill single mother in 1980s and 1990s New York City when homelessness was at an all-time high. Together, they survived violence, hunger, and fear. While Sanders cared for her abusive mother, she also slowly began to seek a way out of poverty through education. She went on to attend an elite boarding school and Vassar College by way of academic scholarships. Sanders went on to pursue careers in journalism, academia, and communications before her mother was diagnosed with terminal cancer in 2011. Exploring themes of faith, identity and perseverance, Sanders candidly details the heartbreak of caring for a mentally ill parent while also telling the rare story of invisible families who grow up in poverty in New York City and throughout the United States in this unforgettable memoir.
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