How Greek Tragedy Works

How Greek Tragedy Works

This is an indispensable guide for anyone who finds themselves confronted with tackling the Greek classics, whether as a reader, scholar, student, or director.

Author: Brian Kulick

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0367634066

Category: Greek drama (Tragedy)

Page: 184

View: 406

How Greek Tragedy Works is a journey through the hidden meanings and dual nature of Greek tragedy, drawing on its foremost dramatists to bring about a deeper understanding of how and why to engage with these enduring plays. Brian Kulick dispels the trepidation that many readers feel with regard to classical texts by equipping them with ways in which they can unpack the hidden meanings of these plays. He focuses on three of the key texts of Greek theatre: Aeschylus' Agamemnon, Euripides' The Bacchae, and Sophocles' Electra, and uses them to tease out the core principles of the theatre-making and storytelling impulses. By encouraging us to read between the lines like this, he also enables us to read these and other Greek tragedies as artists' manifestos, equipping us not only to understand tragedy itself, but also to interpret what the great playwrights had to say about the nature of plays and drama. This is an indispensable guide for anyone who finds themselves confronted with tackling the Greek classics, whether as a reader, scholar, student, or director.
Categories: Greek drama (Tragedy)

How Greek Tragedy Works

How Greek Tragedy Works

How Greek Tragedy Works is a journey through the hidden meanings and dual nature of Greek tragedy, drawing on its foremost dramatists to bring about a deeper understanding of how and why to engage with these enduring plays.

Author: Brian Kulick

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000291513

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 184

View: 462

How Greek Tragedy Works is a journey through the hidden meanings and dual nature of Greek tragedy, drawing on its foremost dramatists to bring about a deeper understanding of how and why to engage with these enduring plays. Brian Kulick dispels the trepidation that many readers feel with regard to classical texts by equipping them with ways in which they can unpack the hidden meanings of these plays. He focuses on three of the key texts of Greek theatre: Aeschylus' Agamemnon, Euripides' The Bacchae, and Sophocles' Electra, and uses them to tease out the core principles of the theatre-making and storytelling impulses. By encouraging us to read between the lines like this, he also enables us to read these and other Greek tragedies as artists' manifestos, equipping us not only to understand tragedy itself, but also to interpret what the great playwrights had to say about the nature of plays and drama. This is an indispensable guide for anyone who finds themselves confronted with tackling the Greek classics, whether as a reader, scholar, student, or director.
Categories: Performing Arts

Greek Tragedy

Greek Tragedy

This volume also includes extracts from Aristophanes' comedy The Frogs and a selection from Aristotle's Poetics. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world.

Author: Aeschylus

Publisher: National Geographic Books

ISBN: 9780141439365

Category: Drama

Page: 0

View: 869

Three masterpieces of classical tragedy Containing Aeschylus's Agamemnon, Sophocles' Oedipus Rex, and Euripides' Medea, this important new selection brings the best works of the great tragedians together in one perfect introductory volume. This volume also includes extracts from Aristophanes' comedy The Frogs and a selection from Aristotle's Poetics. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.
Categories: Drama

A Guide to Ancient Greek Drama

A Guide to Ancient Greek Drama

This newly updated second edition features wide-ranging, systematically organized scholarship in a concise introduction to ancient Greek drama, which flourished from the sixth to third century BC. Covers all three genres of ancient Greek ...

Author: Ian C. Storey

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118455128

Category: Drama

Page: 352

View: 223

This newly updated second edition features wide-ranging, systematically organized scholarship in a concise introduction to ancient Greek drama, which flourished from the sixth to third century BC. Covers all three genres of ancient Greek drama – tragedy, comedy, and satyr-drama Surveys the extant work of Aeschylus, Sophokles, Euripides, Aristophanes, and Menander, and includes entries on ‘lost’ playwrights Examines contextual issues such as the origins of dramatic art forms; the conventions of the festivals and the theater; drama’s relationship with the worship of Dionysos; political dimensions of drama; and how to read and watch Greek drama Includes single-page synopses of every surviving ancient Greek play
Categories: Drama

Five Great Greek Tragedies

Five Great Greek Tragedies

Features Oedipus Rex and Electra by Sophocles (translated by George Young), Medea and Bacchae by Euripides (translated by Henry Hart Milman), and Prometheus Bound by Aeschylus (translated by George Thomson).

Author: Sophocles

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 9780486113883

Category: Drama

Page: 288

View: 416

Features Oedipus Rex and Electra by Sophocles (translated by George Young), Medea and Bacchae by Euripides (translated by Henry Hart Milman), and Prometheus Bound by Aeschylus (translated by George Thomson).
Categories: Drama

Greek Tragedies III

Greek Tragedies III

This edition also includes brand-new translations of Euripides’ Medea, The Children of Heracles, Andromache, and Iphigenia among the Taurians, fragments of lost plays by Aeschylus, and the surviving portion of Sophocles’s satyr-drama ...

Author: Aeschylus

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226036090

Category: Drama

Page: 340

View: 521

Greek Tragedies, Volume III contains Aeschylus’s “The Eumenides,” translated by Richmond Lattimore; Sophocles’s “Philoctetes,” translated by David Grene; Sophocles’s “Oedipus at Colonus,” translated by Robert Fitzgerald; Euripides’s “The Bacchae,” translated by William Arrowsmith; and Euripides’s “Alecestis,” translated by Richmond Lattimore. Sixty years ago, the University of Chicago Press undertook a momentous project: a new translation of the Greek tragedies that would be the ultimate resource for teachers, students, and readers. They succeeded. Under the expert management of eminent classicists David Grene and Richmond Lattimore, those translations combined accuracy, poetic immediacy, and clarity of presentation to render the surviving masterpieces of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides in an English so lively and compelling that they remain the standard translations. Today, Chicago is taking pains to ensure that our Greek tragedies remain the leading English-language versions throughout the twenty-first century. In this highly anticipated third edition, Mark Griffith and Glenn W. Most have carefully updated the translations to bring them even closer to the ancient Greek while retaining the vibrancy for which our English versions are famous. This edition also includes brand-new translations of Euripides’ Medea, The Children of Heracles, Andromache, and Iphigenia among the Taurians, fragments of lost plays by Aeschylus, and the surviving portion of Sophocles’s satyr-drama The Trackers. New introductions for each play offer essential information about its first production, plot, and reception in antiquity and beyond. In addition, each volume includes an introduction to the life and work of its tragedian, as well as notes addressing textual uncertainties and a glossary of names and places mentioned in the plays. In addition to the new content, the volumes have been reorganized both within and between volumes to reflect the most up-to-date scholarship on the order in which the plays were originally written. The result is a set of handsome paperbacks destined to introduce new generations of readers to these foundational works of Western drama, art, and life.
Categories: Drama

Guide To Greek Theatre And Drama

Guide To Greek Theatre And Drama

An indispensible guide to the form, background and performance of plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes and Menander, the works of whom maintain a crucial influence over contemporary western drama.

Author: Kenneth McLeish

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9780413720306

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 322

View: 986

An authoritative and energetic introduction to the theatre of Ancient Greece. An indispensible guide to the form, background and performance of plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes and Menander, the works of whom maintain a crucial influence over contemporary western drama.
Categories: Performing Arts

Agamemnon S Mask Greek Tragedy And Beyond

Agamemnon S Mask   Greek Tragedy And Beyond

This collection is a collaborative Australian-Indian one. The location in different cultures of both the editors and contributors has enabled the range of essays represented in this Reader. What the collection foregrounds

Author: Terry Collits

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 0230630332

Category: English drama (Tragedy)

Page: 392

View: 634

Along with democracy, tragedy is recognized as a genuine invention of the Athenians (fifth century BC). Indeed, what is now referred to often as the golden age of Ancient Greece is based on the development at the level of both the art and politics: tragic drama and the democratic form of government. The two cultural institutions then are rightly considered to be central elements of the Greek heritage . This collection seeks to complement and stimulate the broad interest in tragedy demonstrated in university curricula around the world. Both the ancient Greek plays and their successors such as Shakespeare in the Renaissance, or playwrights such as Brecht and Beckett in the twentieth century, have extended the range and complexity of the category of tragedy. What is being mapped in this collection of critical essays is the variety of ways in which teachers, students, and theatre practitioners now think, talk, produce and enact tragedies. Contributors to this anthology seek to achieve two broad aims. The first is to increase respect for the complexity of the texts themselves (albeit working mainly through the medium of translation) as well as a detailed understanding of their original context; the second is to adopt the position of contemporary readers who bring a range of contemporary theoretical approaches to bear in their search for meaning in these classical works. They include theatre theory and practice, feminism and gender sensitivity, new understandings of the very concepts of text and narrative and the impact on extra literary fields of knowledge such as psychoanalysis - all contribute to our reading of the genre of tragedy today. These in particular reflect some of the most exciting work on tragedy of the last fifty years. This collection is a collaborative Australian-Indian one. The location in different cultures of both the editors and contributors has enabled the range of essays represented in this Reader. What the collection foregrounds
Categories: English drama (Tragedy)

Translations of Greek Tragedy in the Work of Ezra Pound

Translations of Greek Tragedy in the Work of Ezra Pound

drama. As such he also notes that the individual Noh plays deal with 'for the most part known situations, in a manner analogous to that of the Greek plays, in which we find, for instance, a known Oedipus in a known predicament' (ibid.

Author: Peter Liebregts

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350084162

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 280

View: 855

Turning the tables on the misconception that Ezra Pound knew little Greek, this volume looks at his work translating Greek tragedy and considers how influential this was for his later writing. Pound's work as a translator has had an enormous impact on the theory and practice of translation, and continues to be a source of heated debate. While scholars have assessed his translations from Chinese, Latin, and even Provençal, his work on Greek tragedy remains understudied. Pound's versions of Greek tragedy (of Aeschylus' Agamemnon, and of Sophocles' Elektra and Women of Trachis) have received scant attention, as it has been commonly assumed that Pound knew little of the language. Liebregts shows that the poet's knowledge of Greek was much more comprehensive than is generally assumed, and that his renderings were based on a careful reading of the source texts. He identifies the works Pound used as the basis for his translations, and contextualises his versions with regard to his biography and output, particularly The Cantos. A wealth of understudied source material is analysed, such as Pound's personal annotations in his Loeb edition of Sophocles, his unpublished correspondence with classical scholars such as F. R. Earp and Rudd Fleming, as well as manuscript versions and other as-yet-unpublished drafts and texts which illuminate his working methodology.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Lost Plays of Greek Tragedy Volume 1

The Lost Plays of Greek Tragedy  Volume 1

pre-472 tragedies is a significantly different sort of task from (let us say) trying to reconstruct the lost plays of Euripides. Even though all these works can be lumped together as 'the lost plays of Greek tragedy', ...

Author: Matthew Wright

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781472567772

Category: Drama

Page: 312

View: 356

Numerous books have been written about Greek tragedy, but almost all of them are concerned with the 32 plays that still survive. This book, by contrast, concentrates on the plays that no longer exist. Hundreds of tragedies were performed in Athens and further afield during the classical period, and even though nearly all are lost, a certain amount is known about them through fragments and other types of evidence. Matthew Wright offers an authoritative two-volume critical introduction and guide to the lost tragedies. This first volume examines the remains of works by playwrights such as Phrynichus, Agathon, Neophron, Critias, Astydamas, Chaeremon, and many others who have been forgotten or neglected. (Volume 2 explores the lost works of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides.) What types of evidence exist for lost tragedies, and how might we approach this evidence? How did these plays become lost or incompletely preserved? How can we explain why all tragedians except Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides became neglected or relegated to the status of 'minor' poets? What changes and continuities can be detected in tragedy after the fifth century BC? Can the study of lost works and neglected authors change our views of Greek tragedy as a genre? This book answers such questions through a detailed study of the fragments in their historical and literary context. Including English versions of previously untranslated fragments as well as in-depth discussion of their significance, The Lost Plays of Greek Tragedy makes these works accessible for the first time.
Categories: Drama