How Democracy Ends

How Democracy Ends

How bad could things get? In How Democracy Ends, David Runciman argues that we are trapped in outdated twentieth-century ideas of democratic failure. By fixating on coups and violence, we are focusing on the wrong threats.

Author: David Runciman

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 1541616782

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 986

A preeminent political scientist's account of the demise of Western democracy and exploration of what lies ahead Since the end of World War II, democracy's sweep across the globe seemed inexorable. Yet today, it seems radically imperiled, even in some of the world's most stable democracies. How bad could things get? In How Democracy Ends, David Runciman argues that we are trapped in outdated twentieth-century ideas of democratic failure. By fixating on coups and violence, we are focusing on the wrong threats. Our societies are too affluent, too elderly, and too networked to fall apart as they did in the past. We need new ways of thinking the unthinkable--a twenty-first-century vision of the end of democracy, and whether its collapse might allow us to move forward to something better. A provocative book by a major political philosopher, How Democracy Ends asks the most trenchant questions that underlie the disturbing patterns of our contemporary political life.
Categories: Political Science

How Democracy Ends

How Democracy Ends

how. democracy. ends. ALL DEMOCRACIES – all societies – look to the fortunes of other states in the hope of glimpsing their own future. When a rival is on the march, we want to know if that means we are about to be eclipsed.

Author: David Runciman

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN: 9781782834120

Category: Political Science

Page:

View: 399

'Scintillating ... thought-provoking ... one of the very best of the great crop of recent books on the subject.' Andrew Rawnsley, Observer Democracy has died hundreds of times, all over the world. We think we know what that looks like: chaos descends and the military arrives to restore order, until the people can be trusted to look after their own affairs again. However, there is a danger that this picture is out of date. Until very recently, most citizens of Western democracies would have imagined that the end was a long way off, and very few would have thought it might be happening before their eyes as Trump, Brexit and paranoid populism have become a reality. David Runciman, one of the UK's leading professors of politics, answers all this and more as he surveys the political landscape of the West, helping us to spot the new signs of a collapsing democracy and advising us on what could come next.
Categories: Political Science

Confronting Leviathan

Confronting Leviathan

This is a history of ideas to help make sense of what's happening today. --

Author: David Runciman

Publisher:

ISBN: 1788167821

Category: Philosophy

Page: 288

View: 158

Based on the History Of Ideas podcast series by Talking Politics host David Runciman, A History of Ideas explores some of the most important thinkers and prominent ideas lying behind modern politics - from Hobbes to Gandhi, from democracy to patriarchy, and from revolution to lock down. While explaining the most important and often-cited ideas of thinkers such as Constant, De Tocqueville, Marx and Engels, Hayek, MacKinnon and Fukuyama, David Runciman shows how crises - revolutions, wars, depressions, pandemics - generated these new ways of political thinking. This is a history of ideas to help make sense of what's happening today.
Categories: Philosophy

Karl Polanyi and the Contemporary Political Crisis

Karl Polanyi and the Contemporary Political Crisis

Runciman, David: How Democracy Ends, Profile Books, 2018. Rutherford, Jonathan: 'Varieties of ... Sandel, Michael J.: What Money Can't Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets, Penguin, 2012. Sassen, Saskia: 'Who Owns Our Cities – and Why This ...

Author: Peadar Kirby

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350117846

Category: Philosophy

Page: 256

View: 148

Has politics reached breaking point? Rather than defending liberalism or abandoning it, how can a socially just and ecological alternative be built? Peadar Kirby investigates the causes of our current multifaceted global crisis by drawing on the work of Karl Polanyi. This book explores Polanyi's theory that social disruptions result from the attempt to run society according to the rules of the market. Drawing on these ideas, it outlines pathways towards an alternative future that overcome weaknesses in Marxism. Linking the ecological, political and socio-economic crises, Kirby identifies that an alternative socio-ecological model is emerging, consistent with the insights of Polanyi. Karl Polanyi and the Contemporary Political Crisis is an urgent intervention into key debates on the future of politics, on the low-carbon transition, on automation and on the emerging world order.
Categories: Philosophy

Suffer the Children

Suffer the Children

David Runciman (2018b), How Democracy Ends, New York: Basic Books, p. 112. 2. See Ronald Dworkin (1978), Taking Rights Seriously, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, p. xi. 3. Ibid., p. 192. For a critique of Dworkin's view of ...

Author: Richard P. Hiskes

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780197565988

Category: Political Science

Page: 204

View: 151

"This book begins with the recognition that continued practical denial of the human rights of children globally is due to the absence of any theoretical foundation justifying their reality. The goal of this book is to provide that foundation. Such a foundation departs from the eighteenth-century rationalist justification for human rights generally, and provides a new conceptualization for all human rights that embraces the facts of human vulnerability and capacity for promising as the real basis for rights. As such, children also qualify for full human rights, including those to a safe environment, to dignity, and to full participation as citizens, including voting rights. The theoretical foundation of children's human rights expands upon the "participation" rights included in the 1990 UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. Furthermore, full recognition of children's alters the composition and focus human rights to include the rights of future generations, group rights, and the pre-eminence of social and economic rights over civil and political rights"--
Categories: Political Science

How Sick Is British Democracy

How Sick Is British Democracy

about which party ought to govern, there was no question of the health of British democracy. I have always approached British politics by systematic diagnosis ... How Democracy Ends. London: Profile Books. Schumpeter, Joseph A. 1952.

Author: Richard Rose

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030731236

Category: Democracy

Page: 178

View: 769

Forecasts of the death of democracy are often heard and the United Kingdom is on the death watch list. This book challenges such a gloomy view by carefully examining the health of the British body politic from Tony Blair's time in Downing Street to the challenges of Brexit and the coronavirus pandemic. It finds some parts are in good health, for example, elections are free and losers as well as winners accept the results, unlike the United States. Other parts show intermittent symptoms of ill health, such as Cabinet ministers avoiding accountability. There is also a chronic problem of managing the unity of the United Kingdom. None of the symptoms is fatal. The book identifies effective remedies for some symptoms, placebos that offer assurance without cure, and perennially popular prescriptions that are politically impossible. Being a healthy democracy does not promise effectiveness in dealing with economic problems, but a big majority of Britons do not want to trade the freedom that comes with democracy for the promises of undemocratic leaders. Richard Rose is Professor of Public Policy at the University of Strathclyde, UK, and a Visiting Fellow at the European University Institute Florence, Italy, and the Science Centre Berlin, Germany. He has been writing award-winning studies of British politics and democracy in comparative perspective for more than half a century.
Categories: Democracy

The Confidence Trap

The Confidence Trap

In this wide-ranging, original, and compelling book, David Runciman tells the story of modern democracy through the history of moments of crisis, from the First World War to the economic crash of 2008.

Author: David Runciman

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691165837

Category: Political Science

Page: 416

View: 638

Why do democracies keep lurching from success to failure? The current financial crisis is just the latest example of how things continue to go wrong, just when it looked like they were going right. In this wide-ranging, original, and compelling book, David Runciman tells the story of modern democracy through the history of moments of crisis, from the First World War to the economic crash of 2008. A global history with a special focus on the United States, The Confidence Trap examines how democracy survived threats ranging from the Great Depression to the Cuban missile crisis, and from Watergate to the collapse of Lehman Brothers. It also looks at the confusion and uncertainty created by unexpected victories, from the defeat of German autocracy in 1918 to the defeat of communism in 1989. Throughout, the book pays close attention to the politicians and thinkers who grappled with these crises: from Woodrow Wilson, Nehru, and Adenauer to Fukuyama and Obama. In The Confidence Trap, David Runciman shows that democracies are good at recovering from emergencies but bad at avoiding them. The lesson democracies tend to learn from their mistakes is that they can survive them—and that no crisis is as bad as it seems. Breeding complacency rather than wisdom, crises lead to the dangerous belief that democracies can muddle through anything—a confidence trap that may lead to a crisis that is just too big to escape, if it hasn't already. The most serious challenges confronting democracy today are debt, the war on terror, the rise of China, and climate change. If democracy is to survive them, it must figure out a way to break the confidence trap.
Categories: Political Science

Democracy Without Shortcuts

Democracy Without Shortcuts

A cursory look at the titles of recent books on democracy—The People vs. Democracy,” How Democracies Die," Authoritarianism in America,” How Democracy Ends"—conveys a clear sense of concern about the danger of democratic deconsolidation ...

Author: Cristina Lafont

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198848189

Category: Philosophy

Page: 288

View: 164

This book articulates a participatory conception of deliberative democracy that takes the democratic ideal of self-government seriously. It aims to improve citizens' democratic control and vindicate the value of citizens' participation against conceptions that threaten to undermine it. The book critically analyzes deep pluralist, epistocratic, and lottocratic conceptions of democracy. Their defenders propose various institutional ''shortcuts'' to help solve problems of democratic governance such as overcoming disagreements, citizens' political ignorance, or poor-quality deliberation. However, all these shortcut proposals require citizens to blindly defer to actors over whose decisions they cannot exercise control. Implementing such proposals would therefore undermine democracy. Moreover, it seems naive to assume that a community can reach better outcomes 'faster' if it bypasses the beliefs and attitudes of its citizens. Unfortunately, there are no 'shortcuts' to make a community better than its members. The only road to better outcomes is the long, participatory road that is taken when citizens forge a collective will by changing one another's hearts and minds. However difficult the process of justifying political decisions to one another may be, skipping it cannot get us any closer to the democratic ideal. Starting from this conviction, the book defends a conception of democracy ''without shortcuts''. This conception sheds new light on long-standing debates about the proper scope of public reason, the role of religion in politics, and the democratic legitimacy of judicial review. It also proposes new ways to unleash the democratic potential of institutional innovations such as deliberative minipublics.
Categories: Philosophy

Democratic Failure

Democratic Failure

For example, Patrick Kingsley, “Taking an Ax to Democracy as Europe Fidgets,” New York Times, February 11, 2018, A1, A10; David Frum, “How to Build an Autocracy,” The Atlantic, March 2017; Wojciech Sadurski, “How Democracy Dies (in ...

Author: Melissa Schwartzberg

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9781479804795

Category: Law

Page:

View: 430

Explores the challenges facing democracies in the twenty-first century In Democratic Failure, Melissa Schwartzberg and Daniel Viehoff bring together a distinguished group of interdisciplinary scholars in political science, law, and philosophy to explore the key questions and challenges facing democracies, both in the past and present, around the world. In ten timely essays, contributors examine the fascinating, centuries-old question of whether or not democracy can ever fulfill the promise of its ideals. Together, they explore lessons from the history of democracy, various failures of democratic representation, and more. Ultimately, this latest installment of the NOMOS series provides thought-provoking insights into how we conceptualize, measure, and address democratic erosion in our present-day world.
Categories: Law

Kierkegaard Trumping Trump

Kierkegaard Trumping Trump

Divinity Resurrecting Democracy Curtis L. Thompson ... Runciman's analysis leads him to the view that democracy will very likely not come to a sudden end but will rather limp along, ... Runciman, How Democracy Ends, 216–17. 4.

Author: Curtis L. Thompson

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781532686863

Category: Religion

Page: 214

View: 267

We are now becoming numbed by the outrageous events taking place within the political arena of our country. Throughout our nation, the division between factions continues to hold firm. The issue of how movement toward reconciliation can occur has become ever more pressing. Nothing short of our democracy is at stake. This book looks to the writings of the nineteenth-century Danish religious philosopher Søren Kierkegaard as a resource for thinking in fresh ways about how the divine power of creative transformation is at work in the world. Through divinity’s empowering of our practices in relating to others, democracy can be resurrected to a new, healthy life. Six important themes from Kierkegaard’s thought are used to do a comparative examination of Donald Trump together with his world and Kierkegaard and his world. The story of this standoff—between one of the world’s most famous and well-publicized figures and one of the world’s greatest thinkers—constitutes a compelling investigation and presents quite a contrast. Uncovered in the storytelling process of Kierkegaard trumping Trump are the “Sweet 16”: sixteen ways in which resurrection can be practiced in people’s lives and help to restore our democracy to a fuller and more vibrant version of itself.
Categories: Religion