Hitchcock and the Making of Marnie

Hitchcock and the Making of Marnie

This revised edition features four new chapters that provide even more fascinating insights into the film’s production and Hitchcock’s working methods.

Author: Tony Lee Moral

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN: 9780810891081

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 340

View: 857

After a decade of successful films that included Rear Window, Vertigo, North by Northwest, and Psycho, Alfred Hitchcock produced Marnie, an apparent artistic failure and an unquestionable commercial disappointment. Over the decades, however, the film’s reputation has undergone a reevaluation, and both critics and fans alike have come to appreciate Marnie’s many qualities. In Hitchcock and the Making of Marnie, Tony Lee Moral investigates the cultural and political factors governing the 1964 film’s production, the causes of its critical and commercial failure, and Marnie’s relevance for today’s artists and filmmakers. Hitchcock’s style, motivation, and fears regarding the film are well-documented in this examination of one of his most undervalued efforts. Moral uses extensive research, including personal interviews with Tippi Hedren and Psycho screenwriter Joseph Stefano—as well as unpublished excerpts from interviews with Hitchcock himself—to delve into the issues surrounding the film’s production and release. This revised edition features four new chapters that provide even more fascinating insights into the film’s production and Hitchcock’s working methods. Biographies of Winston Graham—the author of the novel on which the film is based—and screenwriter Jay Presson Allen provide clues into how they brought a feminist viewpoint to Marnie. Additional material addresses Hitchcock’s unrealized project Mary Rose and his efforts to bring it to the screen, the director’s visual style and subjective approach to Marnie, and an exploration of the “real” Alfred Hitchcock. The book also addresses criticisms of the director following the HBO television movie The Girl, which depicted the filming of Marnie. With newly obtained access to the Hitchcock Collection Production Archives at the Margaret Herrick Library, the files of Jay and Lewis Allen, and the memoirs of Winston Graham—as well as interviews in 2012 with the Hitchcock crew—this new edition of Hitchcock and the Making of Marnie provides an invaluable look behind the scenes of a film that has finally been recognized for its influence and vision. It contains more than thirty photos, including a storyboard sequence for the film.
Categories: Performing Arts

Hitchcock and the Censors

Hitchcock and the Censors

Marnie. (1964). 1. Gottlieb and Allen, The Hitchcock Annual Anthology, 24. 2.
Moral, Hitchcock and the Making of “Marnie,” 19. 3. Gottlieb and Allen, The
Hitchcock Annual Anthology, 24. 4. Moral, Hitchcock and the Making of “Marnie,”
37. 5.

Author: John Billheimer

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 9780813177434

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

View: 521

Throughout his career, Alfred Hitchcock had to deal with a wide variety of censors attuned to the slightest suggestion of sexual innuendo, undue violence, toilet humor, religious disrespect, and all forms of indecency, real or imagined. From 1934 to 1968, the Motion Picture Production Code Office controlled the content and final cut on all films made and distributed in the United States. Code officials protected sensitive ears from standard four-letter words, as well as a few five-letter words like tramp and six-letter words like cripes. They also scrubbed "excessively lustful" kissing from the screen and ensured that no criminal went unpunished. During their review of Hitchcock's films, the censors demanded an average of 22.5 changes, ranging from the mundane to the mind-boggling, on each of his American films. Code reviewers dictated the ending of Rebecca (1940), absolved Cary Grant of guilt in Suspicion (1941), edited Cole Porter's lyrics in Stage Fright (1950), decided which shades should be drawn in Rear Window (1954), and shortened the shower scene in Psycho (1960). In Hitchcock and the Censors, author John Billheimer traces the forces that led to the Production Code and describes Hitchcock's interactions with code officials on a film-by-film basis as he fought to protect his creations, bargaining with code reviewers and sidestepping censorship to produce a lifetime of memorable films. Despite the often-arbitrary decisions of the code board, Hitchcock still managed to push the boundaries of sex and violence permitted in films by charming -- and occasionally tricking -- the censors and by swapping off bits of dialogue, plot points, and individual shots (some of which had been deliberately inserted as trading chips) to protect cherished scenes and images. By examining Hitchcock's priorities in dealing with the censors, this work highlights the director's theories of suspense as well as his magician-like touch when negotiating with code officials.
Categories: Social Science

The Making of Hitchcock s The Birds

The Making of Hitchcock s The Birds

The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds examines Hitchcock's most innovative and technically challenging film: from its modernist underpinnings and art director Robert Boyle's initial sketches influenced by Munch's The Scream, to the ...

Author: Tony Lee Moral

Publisher: Old Castle

ISBN: 1842439545

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 223

View: 229

The most innovative and technically challenging of Hitchcock's films, The birds spawned many imitators and triggered the cycle for a series of disaster and man-versus-nature films. Moral charts every aspect of the film's production, and provides the ultimate guide to Hitchcock's most ambitious film.
Categories: Performing Arts

Must We Kill the Thing We Love

Must We Kill the Thing We Love

See Robin Wood, Hitchcock's Films Revisited (New York: Columbia University
Press, 2002), 183. 9. Ralph Waldo Emerson, Poems and Essays (Boston:
Houghton Mifflin, 1897), 3. 10. Tony L. Moral, Hitchcock and the Making of “
Marnie” ...

Author: William Rothman

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231537308

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 352

View: 993

William Rothman argues that the driving force of Hitchcock's work was his struggle to reconcile the dark vision of his favorite Oscar Wilde quote, "Each man kills the thing he loves," with the quintessentially American philosophy, articulated in Emerson's writings, that gave classical Hollywood movies of the New Deal era their extraordinary combination of popularity and artistic seriousness. A Hitchcock thriller could be a comedy of remarriage or a melodrama of an unknown woman, both Emersonian genres, except for the murderous villain and godlike author, Hitchcock, who pulls the villain's strings—and ours. Because Hitchcock believed that the camera has a murderous aspect, the question "What if anything justifies killing?," which every Hitchcock film engages, was for him a disturbing question about his own art. Tracing the trajectory of Hitchcock's career, Rothman discerns a progression in the films' meditations on murder and artistic creation. This progression culminates in Marnie (1964), Hitchcock's most controversial film, in which Hitchcock overcame his ambivalence and fully embraced the Emersonian worldview he had always also resisted. Reading key Emerson passages with the degree of attention he accords to Hitchcock sequences, Rothman discovers surprising affinities between Hitchcock's way of thinking cinematically and the philosophical way of thinking Emerson's essays exemplify. He finds that the terms in which Emerson thought about reality, about our "flux of moods," about what it is within us that never changes, about freedom, about America, about reading, about writing, and about thinking are remarkably pertinent to our experience of films and to thinking and writing about them. He also reflects on the implications of this discovery, not only for Hitchcock scholarship but also for film criticism in general.
Categories: Performing Arts

Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho

Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho

Matters were slowly to worsen between Hitchcock and the company. About
midway through production on The Birds, Hitchcock again contacted Joseph
Stefano about reviving Marnie as a starring vehicle for his protégée 'Tippi'
Hedren.

Author: Stephen Rebello

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 9781453201220

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 224

View: 931

A “meticulous history” of the classic suspense film based on exclusive interviews with the director, writers, cast, and crew (The New York Times Book Review). First released in June 1960, Psycho altered the landscape of horror films forever. But just as compelling as the movie itself is the story behind it, which has been adapted as a movie starring Anthony Hopkins as Hitchcock, Helen Mirren as his wife Alma Reville, and Scarlett Johansson as Janet Leigh. Stephen Rebello brings to life the creation of one of Hollywood’s most iconic films, from the story of Wisconsin murderer Ed Gein, the real-life inspiration for the character of Norman Bates, to Hitchcock’s groundbreaking achievements in cinematography, sound, editing, and promotion. Packed with captivating insights from the film’s stars, writers, and crewmembers, Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho is a riveting and definitive history of a signature Hitchcock cinematic masterpiece.
Categories: Performing Arts

Hitchcock

Hitchcock

Filled with fascinating anecdotes and intriguing excerpts from Hitchcock's personal files, and augmented by interviews with Hitch cock associates, this is a thoroughly documented and engagingly written book.

Author: Robert E. Kapsis

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226424898

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 313

View: 790

From the beginning of his career, Alfred Hitchcock wanted to be considered an artist. Although his thrillers were immensely popular, and Hitchcock himself courted reviewers, he was, for many years, regarded as no more than a master craftsman. By the 1960s, though, critics began calling him an artist of unique vision and gifts. What happened to make Hitchcock's reputation as a true innovator and singular talent? Through a close examination of Hitchcock's personal papers, scripts, production notes, publicity files, correspondence, and hundreds of British and American reviews, Robert Kapsis here traces Hitchcock's changing critical fortunes. Vertigo, for instance, was considered a flawed film when first released; today it is viewed by many as the signal achievement of a great director. According to Kapsis, this dramatic change occurred because the making of the Hitchcock legend was not solely dependent on the quality of his films. Rather, his elevation to artist was caused by a successful blending of self-promotion, sponsorship by prominent members of the film community, and, most important, changes in critical theory which for the first time allowed for the idea of director as auteur. Kapsis also examines the careers of several other filmmakers who, like Hitchcock, have managed to cross the line that separates craftsman from artist, and shows how Hitchcock's legacy and reputation shed light on the way contemporary reputations are made. In a chapter about Brian De Palma, the most reknowned thriller director since Hitchcock, Kapsis explores how Hitchcock's legacy has affected contemporary work in—and criticism of—the thriller genre. Filled with fascinating anecdotes and intriguing excerpts, and augmented by interviews with Hitchcock's associates, this thoroughly documented and engagingly written book will appeal to scholars and film enthusiasts alike. "Required reading for Hitchcock scholars...scrupulously researched, invaluable material for those who continue to ask: what made the master tick?"—Anthony Perkins
Categories: Performing Arts

Alfred Hitchcock s Moviemaking Master Class

Alfred Hitchcock s Moviemaking Master Class

Now in this Movie Making Master Class, Hitchcock author and aficionado Tony Lee Moral takes you through the process of making a ?motion picture, Hitchcock-style.

Author: Tony Lee Moral

Publisher:

ISBN: 1615931376

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 224

View: 261

Alfred Hitchcock is one of the most revered filmmakers of the 20th century. Not only was he the "Master of Suspense," he was also an innovator of storyboarding, directing, framing, editing, and marketing. Hitchcock regularly engaged with his audiences and gave lectures at film institutes, universities, and film schools across the country. Now in this Movie Making Master Class, Hitchcock author and aficionado Tony Lee Moral takes you through the process of making a ?motion picture, Hitchcock-style. • Includes unpublished art production sketches from the Alfred Hitchcock ?Collection and storyboards sketched by Hitchcock himself. • New interviews with actors who worked with Hitchcock including Doris Day, Alec McCowen, Rod Taylor, Karin Dor, Barbara Leigh-Hunt, Tippi Hedren, Veronica Cartwright, who give insights into his movie making methods. • Quotes from contemporary filmmakers on why Hitchcock was the master of suspense and storytelling.
Categories: Performing Arts

The Men Who Knew Too Much

The Men Who Knew Too Much

Henry James and Alfred Hitchcock Susan M. Griffin, Alan Nadel ... In Hitchcock
and the Making of Marnie (2005), Tony Moral notes that the film was “a
commercial as well as a critical failure, causing the director to lose a great deal of
 ...

Author: Susan M. Griffin

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199910571

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 401

Henry James and Alfred Hitchcock knew too much. Self-imposed exiles fully in the know, they approached American and European society as inside-outsiders, a position that afforded them a kind of double vision. Masters of their arts, manipulators of their audiences, prescient and pathbreaking in their techniques, these demanding and meticulous artists fiercely defended authorial and directorial control. Their fictions and films are obsessed with knowledge and its powers: who knows what? What is there to know? The Men Who Knew Too Much innovatively pairs these two greats, showing them to be at once classic and contemporary. Over a dozen major scholars and critics take up works by James and Hitchcock, in paired sets, to explore the often surprising ways that reading James helps us watch Hitchcock and what watching Hitchcock tells us about reading James. A wide-range of approaches offer fresh insights about spectatorship, narrative structure, and cinematic representation, as well as the relationship between technology and art, the powers of silence, sensory-and sensational-experiences, the impact of cognition, and the uncertainty of interpretation. The essays explore the avowal and disavowal of familial bonds, as well as questions of Victorian convention, female agency, and male anxiety. And they fruitfully engage issues related to patriarchy, colonialism, national, transnational, and global identities. The capacious collection, with its brilliant insights and intellectual surprises, is equally compelling in its range and cogency for James readers and film theorists, for Hitchcock fans and James scholars.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Alfred Hitchcock

Alfred Hitchcock

This inadequacy towards his film - making practice was something which
Hitchcock himself felt acutely . Two years after making Marnie , he saw Blow - Up
. His response to the writer Howard Fast : ' My God , Howard ! I've just seen
Antonioni's ...

Author: Richard Allen

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781838714277

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 384

View: 509

This collection of essays displays the range and breadth of Hitchcock scholarship and assesses the significance of his body of work as a bridge between the fin de siecle culture of the 19th century and the 20th century. It engages with Hitchcock's characteristic formal and aesthetic preoccupations.
Categories: Performing Arts

It s Only a Movie

It s Only a Movie

Connery remembered having “a bloody good time” making Marnie. “Hitchcock
and his wife were very generous to us, inviting us to their home, showing us
southern California. He had his way of directing, as with every director. I saw he
didn't ...

Author: Charlotte Chandler

Publisher: Hal Leonard Corporation

ISBN: 9781476849409

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 368

View: 306

North by Northwest. Psycho. Rear Window. The Birds. Vertigo. When it comes to murder and mayhem, shock and suspense, the films of Alfred Hitchcock can not be surpassed. For this book, Charlotte Chandler interviewed Hitchcock, his wife, daughter, film crew members, and many of the stars who appeared in his films, including Kim Novak, Janet Leigh, Cary Grant, Tippi Hedren and James Stewart. Throughout the book, Chandler shares Hitchcock's wit and wisdom. When actors took themselves too seriously, he would remind them, “it's only a movie.” Chandler introduces us to the real Hitchcock, a devoted family man and notorious practical joker, who made suspenseful thrillers mixed with subtle humor and tacit eroticism. “It's Only a Movie is the best book ever written about my father. It really is amazing.” – Patricia Hitchcock
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Scripting Hitchcock

Scripting Hitchcock

Psycho, The Birds, and Marnie Walter Raubicheck, Walter Srebnick. Los Angeles
to study Hitchcock's papers, production materials, and the many drafts of the
screenplays of the three films helped us understand how they had evolved.

Author: Walter Raubicheck

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252036484

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 131

View: 151

Nominated for a nonfiction Edgar Allan Poe Award from the Mystery Writers of America, Scripting Hitchcock explores the collaborative process between Alfred Hitchcock and the screenwriters he hired to write the scripts for three of his greatest films: Psycho, The Birds, and Marnie. Drawing from extensive interviews with the screenwriters and other film technicians who worked for Hitchcock, Walter Raubicheck and Walter Srebnick illustrate how much of the filmmaking process took place not on the set or in front of the camera, but in the adaptation of the sources, the mutual creation of plot and characters by the director and the writers, and the various revisions of the written texts of the films. Hitchcock allowed his writers a great deal of creative freedom, which resulted in dynamic screenplays that expanded traditional narrative and defied earlier conventions. Critically examining the question of authorship in film, Raubicheck and Srebnick argue that Hitchcock did establish visual and narrative priorities for his writers, but his role in the writing process was that of an editor. While the writers and their contributions have generally been underappreciated, this study reveals that all the dialogue and much of the narrative structure of the films were the work of screenwriters Jay Presson Allen, Joseph Stefano, and Evan Hunter. The writers also shaped American cultural themes into material specifically for actors such as Janet Leigh, Tippi Hedren, and Tony Perkins. This volume gives due credit to those writers who gave narrative form to Hitchcock's filmic vision.
Categories: Performing Arts

Film Review

Film Review

film | books Howard Maxford asks So You Wanna Be a Director ? , looks at
Hitchcock and the Making of Marnie and meets Ladies or Gentlemen in his round
- up of the latest movie book releases FOTO BOOK SPOTLIGHT So You Wanna
Be a ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015066043970

Category: Motion pictures

Page:

View: 823

Categories: Motion pictures

Sight and Sound

Sight and Sound

... National Library SOHO 020 7734 2255 020 7733 2229 SCARECROW PRESS
PRESENTS intellect ART FILM CULTURE MEDIA EDUCATION THEATRE
Hitchcock and the Making of Marnie Tony Lee Moral Studies in French Cinema
Edited ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UCSC:32106016660661

Category: Motion pictures

Page:

View: 682

Categories: Motion pictures

Alma Hitchcock

Alma Hitchcock

The Woman Behind the Man Pat Hitchcock O'Connell, Laurent Bouzereau.
Beyond ... M I REMEMBER Mama telling me a funny story that happened during
the making of Marnie that is very indicative of how well she understood Hitch and
how ...

Author: Pat Hitchcock O'Connell

Publisher: Berkley Publishing Group

ISBN: 0425196194

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 289

View: 957

Alfred Hitchcock's films are a testament to his perfectionism and autonomy, yet there was one person whose advice he valued above all others - his wife, Alma. What was her impact on one of the most creative collaborations in film history? Her daughter Pat Hitchcock O'Connel finds out. She traces her mother's life from her early career as film editor, to actress, to her ongoing input to the scripting, casting and direction of her husband's movies. The resulting account of Alma's life is intimate and touching, like a breezy tour through a family album.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Looking for Alfred

Looking for Alfred

3 Most of these artists were brought together in the group show ' Notorious :
Alfred Hitchcock and Contemporary Art ' , a 1999 exhibition at the ... See Norman
H . Holland on Vertigo , or Tony Lee Moral , ' Hitchcock and the Making of Marnie
' .

Author: Johan Grimonprez

Publisher: Hatje Cantz Pub

ISBN: UOM:39015073634936

Category: Art

Page: 286

View: 169

Edited by Steven Bode. Text by Patricia Allmer, Jorge Luis Borges, Chris Darke, Thomas Elsaesser, Tom McCarthy, Jeff Noon, Slavoj Zizek.
Categories: Art

Helicon Nine

Helicon Nine

who felt that Hitchcock wanted " a woman's point of view on Marnie . " 12 The
other reason might have to do with Hitchcock's personal obsession with Tippi
Hedren , for it was during the making of Marnie that Hitchcock's Pygmalion
tendencies ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: MINN:31951P00060839K

Category: Arts

Page:

View: 593

Categories: Arts

G K Hall Bibliographic Guide to Theatre Arts

G K  Hall Bibliographic Guide to Theatre Arts

PN1998 . 3 . H58 K73 2002 Moral , Tony Lee . Hitchcock and the making of
Marnie . Lanham , Md . : Scarecrow Press , 2002 . PN1997 . M2635 M67 2002
HITCHCOCK , ALFRED , 1899 . - CRITICISM AND INTERPRETATION . Nitsche .
Lutz .

Author: New York Public Library. Research Libraries

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105025402921

Category: Drama

Page:

View: 173

Categories: Drama

Sean Connery

Sean Connery

The making of Marnie is shrouded in dark tales of Hitchcock ' s obsession for its
star Tippi Hedren , whose career he nurtured and whole life he tried to control .
The part was originally conceived as Grace Kelly ' s Hollywood comeback , but ...

Author: Robert Sellers

Publisher: Robert Hale Limited

ISBN: STANFORD:36105024916715

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 544

An autobiography of the Scottish screen legend.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Swingin Chicks of the 60s

Swingin  Chicks of the  60s

her screen career off to a quick start in the early '60s with starring roles in two
Alfred Hitchcock movies. ... Anger also writes that while making Marnie Hitchcock
gave Tippi's daughter Melanie "a custom-made portrait doll of her mother,
dressed ...

Author: Chris Strodder

Publisher: Cedco Publishing Company

ISBN: 0768322324

Category: Social Science

Page: 202

View: 155

An affectionate tribute to the women who waged a cultural revolution, "Swingin' Chicks of the '60s" offers photos, profiles and little-known details of the lives of 101 defining divas of the decade, including Twiggy, Annette Funicello, Ann-Margret, Diana Rigg, Patty Duke, Janis Joplin, Cher, Jane Fonda, and Mia Farrow. 300_ photos.
Categories: Social Science