Gringos in Paradise

Gringos in Paradise

In 2004, Barry Golson wrote an award-winning article for AARP magazine about Mexican hot spots for retirees longing for a lifestyle they couldn't afford in the United States.

Author: Barry Golson

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781416547839

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 336

View: 669

A Year in Provence meets Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House in this lively and entertaining account of a couple's year building their dream house in Mexico. In 2004, Barry Golson wrote an award-winning article for AARP magazine about Mexican hot spots for retirees longing for a lifestyle they couldn't afford in the United States. A year later, he and his wife Thia were taking part in the growing trend of retiring abroad. They sold their Manhattan apartment, packed up their SUV, and moved to one of those idyllic hot spots, the surfing and fishing village of Sayulita on Mexico's Pacific coast. With humor and charm, Golson details the year he and his wife spent settling into their new life and planning and building their dream home. Sayulita -- population 1,500, not including stray dogs or pelicans -- is a never-dull mixture of traditional Mexican customs and new, gringo-influenced change. Before long, the Golsons had been absorbed into the rhythms and routines of village life: they adopted a pair of iguanas named Iggy Pop and Iggy Mom, got sick and got cured by a doctor who charged them sixteen dollars a visit, made lasting friends with Mexicans and fellow expatriates, and discovered the skill and artistry of local craftsmen. But their daily lives were mostly dedicated to the difficult yet satisfying process of building their house. It took them almost six months to begin building -- nothing is simple (or speedy) in Mexico -- and incredibly, they completed construction in another six. They engaged a Mexican architect, builder, and landscape designer who not only built their home but also changed their lives; encountered uproariously odd bureaucracy; and ultimately experienced a lifetime's worth of education about the challenges and advantages of living in Mexico. The Golsons lived (and are still living) the dream of many -- not only of going off to a tropical paradise but also of building something beautiful, becoming a part of a new world, making lasting friends, and transforming their lives. As much about family and friendship as about house-building, Gringos in Paradise is an immensely readable and illuminating book about finding a personal paradise and making it a home.
Categories: Business & Economics

Clueless Gringos in Paradise

Clueless Gringos in Paradise

This story takes readers through a hilarious and harrowing journey on airplanes, boats, and buses, in taxis, high-rise hotels, restaurants, and cat-infested fish markets. Add a liberal dose of high anxiety—how could it not be hilarious?

Author: Pamela Foster

Publisher: Oghma Creative Media

ISBN: 9781633735057

Category: Humor

Page: 186

View: 952

Mel Brooks claims that "Tragedy is when I cut my finger. Comedy is when you fall into an open sewer and die." In a snap decision fueled by boredom, Author Pamela Foster and her Vietnam Veteran husband, Jack, sell everything they own and set off for their new home—Bocas del Toro, Panama, a “tropical paradise.” Adventure and change are what they’re seeking, and it’s just what they find when they pick up the leashes of their two 150-pound service dogs and emigrate to a foreign country. Jack is a chronically impulsive former Marine with raging PTSD, and the service dogs, Chesty and Rocca, are mastiffs who are never farther away than the end of a leash. Clueless Gringos in Paradise is as much about escape and adventure as it is companionship, and finding a balance between a wife who is prone to bursts of anxiety, a husband who thinks everything is “just fine,” and two giant dogs that are not cut out for long-distance travel proves to be as challenging as making an impromptu move to another country. This story takes readers through a hilarious and harrowing journey on airplanes, boats, and buses, in taxis, high-rise hotels, restaurants, and cat-infested fish markets. Add a liberal dose of high anxiety—how could it not be hilarious?
Categories: Humor

Gringos in Paradise

Gringos in Paradise

Gringos in Paradise: Our Honduras Odyssey by Malana Ashlie is a delightfully amusing and lighthearted autobiography chronicling her move from the U.S. to the Caribbean Coast of Honduras.

Author: Malana Ashlie

Publisher: Malana Ashlie

ISBN: 9781419657528

Category: Travel

Page: 228

View: 900

Gringos in Paradise: Our Honduras Odyssey by Malana Ashlie is a delightfully amusing and lighthearted autobiography chronicling her move from the U.S. to the Caribbean Coast of Honduras. When she and her husband decide to relocate to a more secluded paradise the fun begins. She shares the trials and triumphs of building a new life in Central America in what can best be described as a spiritual journey of faith.
Categories: Travel

Gringos in Paradise

Gringos in Paradise

GRINGOS IN PARADISE 159 The stepfather then asks her to dance, the music changes to an English (and Disney) version of “Someday My Prince Will Come,” and ...

Author: Barry Golson

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9780743276351

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 325

View: 695

A lighthearted account of the award-winning journalist author's year-long effort to build his dream home in Mexico describes how he and his wife moved to a fishing village on the Pacific coast, forged relationships with locals and fellow ex-pats, and shared the joys and pitfalls of personal house building. 25,000 first printing.
Categories: Business & Economics

Clueless Gringos in Paradise

Clueless Gringos in Paradise

"If you enjoy funny memoirs, you'll love Clueless Gringos in Paradise. This book is unique with a fitting title, and it's refreshing to find a writer who can laugh at herself in a nearly impossible situation.

Author: Pamela Foster

Publisher: Pen L Publishing

ISBN: 1940222028

Category:

Page: 194

View: 647

Mel Brooks claims that "Tragedy is when I cut my finger. Comedy is when you fall into an open sewer and die." Author Pamela Foster and her Vietnam Veteran husband, Jack, sell everything they own, pick up the leashes of two 150-pound service dogs, and emigrate to the "tropical paradise" they expect to find in Panama. Jack is a former Marine with raging PTSD, and the service dogs are mastiffs who are never further away than the end of a leash. The story takes readers through a hilarious and harrowing journey in airplanes, taxis, high-rise hotels, buses, boats, restaurants and cat-infested fish markets. Add a liberal dose of high anxiety - how could t not be hilarious? "If you enjoy funny memoirs, you'll love Clueless Gringos in Paradise. This book is unique with a fitting title, and it's refreshing to find a writer who can laugh at herself in a nearly impossible situation. "The author's humorous voice and talent for storytelling makes readers giggle at parts and erupt into laughter at others . . . one of the funniest memoirs I've read in a long time." - Margo L. Dill, The News-Gazette
Categories:

Cruising Paradise

Cruising Paradise

Their eyes are careful not to meet the gaze of the gringos in funny hats. They care nothing about American football. They're only here for la musica and Bud ...

Author: Sam Shepard

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9781407063935

Category: Fiction

Page: 256

View: 674

His first major book of fiction: lyrical, personal, mythical, hilarious and mesmeric stories that shed new light on both the US and the writer through whose eyes we access this compelling and resonant land.
Categories: Fiction

Run for the Border

Run for the Border

Gringos. in. Paradise. What few people—at least, outside of Mexico—have bothered to notice is that while all the nannies, cooks, and maids have been heading ...

Author: Steven W. Bender

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814723227

Category: Law

Page: 233

View: 559

Mexico and the United States exist in a symbiotic relationship: Mexico frequently provides the United States with cheap labor, illegal goods, and, for criminal offenders, a refuge from the law. In turn, the U.S. offers Mexican laborers the American dream: the possibility of a better livelihood through hard work. To supply each other’s demands, Americans and Mexicans have to cross their shared border from both sides. Despite this relationship, U.S. immigration reform debates tend to be security-focused and center on the idea of menacing Mexicans heading north to steal abundant American resources. Further, Congress tends to approach reform unilaterally, without engaging with Mexico or other feeder countries, and, disturbingly, without acknowledging problematic southern crossings that Americans routinely make into Mexico. In Run for the Border, Steven W. Bender offers a framework for a more comprehensive border policy through a historical analysis of border crossings, both Mexico to U.S. and U.S. to Mexico. In contrast to recent reform proposals, this book urges reform as the product of negotiation and implementation by cross-border accord; reform that honors the shared economic and cultural legacy of the U.S. and Mexico. Covering everything from the history of Anglo crossings into Mexico to escape law authorities, to vice tourism and retirement in Mexico, to today’s focus on Mexican border-crossing immigrants and drug traffickers, Bender takes lessons from the past 150 years to argue for more explicit and compassionate cross-border cooperation. Steeped in several disciplines, Run for the Border is a blend of historical, cultural, and legal perspectives, as well as those from literature and cinema, that reflect Bender’s cultural background and legal expertise.
Categories: Law

The Gringo s Hawk

The Gringo s Hawk

Ecology and spirituality intertwine as he describes his journey in a mix of naturalist and lyrical prose that, along with humor and introspection, mark the style of The Gringos Hawk.The Gringos Hawk represents the culmination of Mr. Marans ...

Author: Jon Marañon

Publisher:

ISBN: 1543445101

Category:

Page: 262

View: 166

This American author has now spent four decades being involved in Costa Ricas terrestrial and marine habitats, documenting the challenges and triumphs of his attempts to make an environmentally conscious sustainable living in this paradise. Jon Maran offers a unique first-person account of nature and persons in conflict and the difficulties of meshing human existence into the recently pristine coastal rainforests of Costa Rica.His work promotes reader awareness of the natural environment, wildlife, ecosystems, and socioculture of this remote area of Costa Rica. Ecology and spirituality intertwine as he describes his journey in a mix of naturalist and lyrical prose that, along with humor and introspection, mark the style of The Gringo's Hawk.The Gringos Hawk represents the culmination of Mr. Marans social struggles and the roles he has played in conservation, education, social well-being, and in establishing national parks and marine reserves in his area.
Categories:

Immersed in Paradise

Immersed in Paradise

I was hit on by a few guys, but the Tico men are all almost a foot shorter than I am, and the gringos didn't turn me on, including the one male I traveled ...

Author: Tom Conway Sr.

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN: 9781440187643

Category: Fiction

Page: 276

View: 940

Immersed in Paradise is the story of a beautiful young woman torn between love and an ambition to serve humanity. Her relationship with her high school sweet heart had endured, even though they were separated during college, and, after graduation three months before September 11, 2001, they each found jobs in law enforcement in Washington. All went well for two years, until Chuck accepted an appointment to become a Federal Agent at Fort Story. Reluctant to be separated, but not ready for marriage, she requested a transfer to work in Norfolk, and secured unpaid leave to attend a language school in Cost a Rica to think things over during his training. While in Central America, she traveled extensively, bonded with her host family, and disappointed several male admirers. She worked with disadvanted children,, sometimes with heart-rending results, and was overwhelmed by the impact of poverty on them, and those she saw while traveling. When her visa expired, she returned home with a greater appreciation of her life, and would forever cherish her memories of the surrogate family of charismatic Italians who had taken her into their home and their hearts!
Categories: Fiction

The Battle for Paradise

The Battle for Paradise

CORRECTION: Regarding the book, The Battle for Paradise by Jeremy Evans, the following correction has been made on page 163 in paragraph three (3) to wit: "Weston once worked in concert with government officials in a pre-planned sting ...

Author: Jeremy Evans

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803284708

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 923

CORRECTION: Regarding the book, The Battle for Paradise by Jeremy Evans, the following correction has been made on page 163 in paragraph three (3) to wit: “Weston once worked in concert with government officials in a pre-planned sting operation, complete with marked bills: Weston, whose role in the operation involved paying a bribe to the Golfito mayor for a concession and then documenting the bribe as a way to expose the mayor as a corrupt government official, was a former cocaine dealer, according to Dan, and someone who illegally acquired possession of his sawmill property.” Pavones, a town located on the southern tip of Costa Rica, is a haven for surfers, expatriates, and fishermen seeking a place to start over. Located on the Golfo Dulce (Sweet Gulf), a marine sanctuary and one of the few tropical fjords in the world, Pavones is home to a legendary surf break and a cottage fishing industry. In 2004 a multinational company received approval to install the world’s first yellowfin tuna farm near the mouth of the Golfo Dulce. The tuna farm as planned would pollute the area, endanger sea turtles, affect the existing fish population, and threaten the world-class wave. A lawsuit was filed just in time, and the project was successfully stalled. Thus began an unlikely alliance of local surfers, fishermen, and global environmental groups to save a wave and one of the most biodiverse places on the planet. In The Battle for Paradise, Jeremy Evans travels to Pavones to uncover the story of how this ragtag group stood up to a multinational company and how a shadowy figure from the town’s violent past became an unlikely hero. In this harrowing but ultimately inspiring story, Evans focuses in turn on a colorful cast of characters with an unyielding love for the ocean and surfing, a company’s unscrupulous efforts to expand profits, and a government that nearly sold out the perfect wave.
Categories: History

Paradise Mislaid

Paradise Mislaid

Gringos. Not in Utopia, subterranean fields, Or some secreted island, Heaven knows where! But in the very world, which is the world Of all of us – the place ...

Author: Anne Whitehead

Publisher: King Tide Publishing

ISBN: 9781925283600

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 600

View: 631

In the 1890s after a period of social unrest, a brave band of Australians sailed from Sydney to found a communal Utopia in South America. Under the charismatic journalist William Lane, over 500 settlers, including poet Mary Gilmore, created a New Australia in the Paraguayan jungle. Their hopes soon collapsed. Many returned home. Others stayed, becoming part of the culture of their adopted country. They learned about Paraguay's Jesuit missions of the 17th and 18th centuries, perhaps the world's most successful communal settlements which were disbanded in violence, the country's catastrophic wars, its revolutions, its repressive dictators, and about another communal experiment led by Elisabeth Nietzsche and Bernhard Forster to create an Aryan master race. Anne Whitehead made three journeys to Paraguay over 12 years and, in a vivid blend of biography and travel writing, uncovers stories of the original colonists and their descendants. Some fought for the British Empire in World War I, others defended Paraguay against Bolivia in the 1932-35 Chaco War; they witnessed the arrival of Nazi war criminals, the manhunt of forest Indians and endured the 35-year dictatorship of President Alfredo Stroessner. Paradise Mislaid won the 1998 NSW Premier's Award for Australian History. Judges' citation: 'An erudite, beautifully researched work of history which knits together the stories of Paraguay and Australian emigration as a quest for Utopia... Whitehead utilises material which was not available to earlier historians. She also takes to heart the well-known adage that a tolerable pair of boots is essential for an historian, and retraces the steps of the original "New Australians" and their descendants. The result is a beautifully-crafted historical and contemporary travelogue.' 'One of the most bizarre stories in Australian history - splendidly told by one of our master story-tellers.' - Frank Moorhouse 'A superb blend of travel writing and history, during which Whitehead casts her discerning eye on the present, with pertinent excursions to the past. This personal odyssey has resulted in a wonderful, rambunctuous, passionate, picaresque narrative that combines meticulous research with compelling personal stories and acute observation. One is swept irresistibly along.' - Tim Bowden, Sydney Morning Herald 'Whitehead has produced a travel book within a carefully researched and densely documented historical frame extending across 600 pages. She is a skillful raconteur and the reader is carried along, largely unmindful that she has used the "Australian Tribe" as a peg on which to suspend her personal reminiscences of Paraguay. Her style strongly resembles the work of Paul Theroux and V.S. Naipaul.' - Transforming Anthropology 'The descendants of the tribe are a fascinating cross-section... Inevitably to follow the families is to create a portrait of Paraguayan life in the past century - a distinct mixture of good times, bad times, of dictators and war. To understand those years, the history of the country has to be traversed. Whitehead does all this with skill and understanding. She has probably the best written account of the Jesuit communes, where the Jesuits defended their converts from the slave traders, communes which lasted two hundred years, almost as long as European settlement in Australia.' - Richard Hall, Australian Book Review 'An exhaustive yet entertaining piece of historical detective work which is at once authoritative, scholarly and delightfully chatty... due to Whitehead's own indefatigable physical adventures, it's also a travel adventure to rival Bruce Chatwin's wanderings.' - The Leader 'Whitehead's book, winner of the NSW Premier's Award, has the intensity of the novel combined with the attentiveness to detail of a good travelogue, and gives a deserved prominence not only to the Paraguayan experiment but also to Australian-Latin American relations in general.' - Antipodes
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Paradise Travel

Paradise Travel

for the first time, that most gringos don't even know where Medellín is, and, as far as most are concerned, I may as well be from Asunción, Maracaibo, ...

Author: Jorge Franco

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 1429935626

Category: Fiction

Page: 240

View: 548

From one of Colombia's leading novelists, a tragicomic story of unrequited love and a view of New York through the wide eyes of an illegal immigrant Paradise Travel recounts the adventures of Marlon Cruz, a naïve young man from Medellín, Colombia, who agrees to accompany the beautiful, ambitious woman he loves to New York. On their first night in Queens, Marlon and Reina lose each other, thus initiating Marlon's descent into the underbelly of our country. A leader of the gritty-realist movement known as McOndo, Jorge Franco evokes the follies and pains of unrequited love at the same time that he explores deeper inequalities between North and South America. Moving between lower-middle-class Colombia and immigrant New York (specifically, the Jackson Heights neighborhood seen recently in the movie Maria Full of Grace), Paradise Travel is an exciting work from a rising star, celebrated by Gabriel García Márquez as "one of those to whom I should like to pass the torch" of Colombian fiction. Praise for Rosario Tijeras: "Latin America's McOndo literary movement drags the butterflies of magical realism into Burger King. With Jorge Franco's narco-saga Rosario Tijeras, it may have found its first masterpiece." —Rachel Aviv, Salon
Categories: Fiction

Negotiating Paradise

Negotiating Paradise

Gringos also appreciated Sanborn's gift shop and pharmacy.∂Ω Mexico's interwar tourism boom did not bring about a large-scale 78 Containment and Good ...

Author: Dennis Merrill

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807898635

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 995

Accounts of U.S. empire building in Latin America typically portray politically and economically powerful North Americans descending on their southerly neighbors to engage in lopsided negotiations. Dennis Merrill's comparative history of U.S. tourism in Latin America in the twentieth century demonstrates that empire is a more textured, variable, and interactive system of inequality and resistance than commonly assumed. In his examination of interwar Mexico, early Cold War Cuba, and Puerto Rico during the Alliance for Progress, Merrill demonstrates how tourists and the international travel industry facilitated the expansion of U.S. consumer and cultural power in Latin America. He also shows the many ways in which local service workers, labor unions, business interests, and host governments vied to manage the Yankee invasion. While national leaders negotiated treaties and military occupations, visitors and hosts navigated interracial encounters in bars and brothels, confronted clashing notions of gender and sexuality at beachside resorts, and negotiated national identities. Highlighting the everyday realities of U.S. empire in ways often overlooked, Merrill's analysis provides historical context for understanding the contemporary debate over the costs and benefits of globalization.
Categories: History

Paradise Man

Paradise Man

... where he rotted eight months, a scarecrow in commandant's fatigues ... until the gringos ransomed him, returned Comandante O to Miami.

Author: Jerome Charyn

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 9781453266380

Category: Fiction

Page: 240

View: 844

A stylish killer makes the mistake of befriending a god Though he doesn’t know mink from sable, Sidney Holden is the most important employee at Aladdin Furs. He is a bumper, a well-dressed killer who collects the debts that cannot be paid, and Aladdin would be nothing without him. After all, fur is murder. As Cuban refugees flood the United States, the New York criminal class is rocked by the appearance of a Santería sect that hails a young girl as the newest incarnation of Changó, their bloodthirsty thunder god. But after a routine hit, Holden finds the girl cowering under the kitchen table—a divine witness to a double murder. Unable to kill her, he takes her with him, sparking an all-out turf war so vicious that Holden will be happy to have any god on his side.
Categories: Fiction

Bird of Paradise

Bird of Paradise

To many of the tens of thousands flooding the city, we're gringos, fake-ass Dominicans, though they are just a few years away from becoming as American as ...

Author: Raquel Cepeda

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781451635881

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 598

In 2009, when Raquel Cepeda almost lost her estranged father to heart disease, she was terrified she’d never know the truth about her ancestry. Every time she looked in the mirror, Cepeda saw a mystery—a tapestry of races and ethnicities that came together in an ambiguous mix. With time running out, she decided to embark on an archaeological dig of sorts by using the science of ancestral DNA testing to excavate everything she could about her genetic history. Digging through memories long buried, she embarks upon a journey not only into her ancestry but also into her own history. Born in Harlem to Dominican parents, she was sent to live with her maternal grandparents in the Paraíso (Paradise) district in Santo Domingo while still a baby. It proved to be an idyllic reprieve in her otherwise fraught childhood. Paraíso came to mean family, home, belonging. When Cepeda returned to the US, she discovered her family constellation had changed. Her mother had a new, abusive boyfriend, who relocated the family to San Francisco. When that relationship fell apart, Cepeda found herself back in New York City with her father and European stepmother: attending tennis lessons and Catholic schools; fighting vicious battles wih her father, who discouraged her from expressing the Dominican part of her hyphenated identity; and immersed in the ’80s hip-hop culture of uptown Manhattan. It was in these streets, through the prism of hip-hop and the sometimes loving embrace of her community, that Cepeda constructed her own identity. Years later, when Cepeda had become a successful journalist and documentary filmmaker, the strands of her DNA would take her further, across the globe and into history. Who were her ancestors? How did they—and she—become Latina? Her journey, as the most unforgettable ones often do, would lead her to places she hadn’t expected to go. With a vibrant lyrical prose and fierce honesty, Cepeda parses concepts of race, identity, and ancestral DNA among Latinos by using her own Dominican-American story as one example, and in the process arrives at some sort of peace with her father.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Stumbling into Paradise

Stumbling into Paradise

Reinventing yourself was one of the expatriated gringos favorite pastimes. By Christmas week the tourist tide had begun to rise rapidly and I was soon busy ...

Author: Steve Osman

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 9781453508008

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 298

View: 270

In 1989 just as tourism was beginning in Costa Rica, the author moved to the tropics with his wife and two young daughters. This is the saga of their often humorous adventures in their new found paradise. The Costa Rican saying pura vida "pure life" summed up their hopes, but they soon learned that there's no such thing as heaven on earth. This is a must read for those contemplating dropping out to live on a tropical beach. Steve and Mary Lou now live in Montana and maintain their home in Manuel Antonio as a vacation rental, visiting as tourists when they can.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Paradise Key

The Paradise Key

“Chiea, your boss, he called back and said okay for twenty thousand. I told him dollars, not pesos, I know how gringos get ...

Author: Hanes Segler

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN: 9780595819621

Category: Fiction

Page: 220

View: 474

Steve Elliott and Danny Ortega, two unlucky men incarcerated in a South Texas prison, plan to escape and start life anew. Getting out was the easy part; after that, the hapless pair face obstacles they didn't envision while sitting in their cells. After enlisting the help of Danny's younger brother Ray, they head for Mexico, where they hope to make their way to California undetected by U. S. authorities. The moment they cross the border, their real troubles begin. Kidnapped by a gang of thugs, they are briefly held captive with an attractive woman and three shadowy Mexican "businessmen" who deftly engineer a daring escape for the entire group. After evading imprisonment for the second time in as many days, the duo finds they are now in bigger trouble. It appears their newfound traveling companions are not what they purported to be. To complicate matters, Steve falls for the woman who has her own mysterious agenda. As their true identities and purpose unfold, Steve and Danny are caught up in a horrendous terrorism plot. Forced by circumstances-and guns-to go along with the invaders, it finally comes down to making the right choice-something that has always proven difficult for Steve and Danny.
Categories: Fiction

The Battle for Paradise

The Battle for Paradise

“Holy shit, look at that,” one of the gringos said. Far below was Playa Zancudo, a perfectly crescent-shaped beach that shone white with sand and glinted ...

Author: Jeremy Evans

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803284722

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 719

CORRECTION: Regarding the book, The Battle for Paradise by Jeremy Evans, the following correction has been made on page 163 in paragraph three (3) to wit: “Weston once worked in concert with government officials in a pre-planned sting operation, complete with marked bills: Weston, whose role in the operation involved paying a bribe to the Golfito mayor for a concession and then documenting the bribe as a way to expose the mayor as a corrupt government official, was a former cocaine dealer, according to Dan, and someone who illegally acquired possession of his sawmill property.” Pavones, a town located on the southern tip of Costa Rica, is a haven for surfers, expatriates, and fishermen seeking a place to start over. Located on the Golfo Dulce (Sweet Gulf), a marine sanctuary and one of the few tropical fjords in the world, Pavones is home to a legendary surf break and a cottage fishing industry. In 2004 a multinational company received approval to install the world’s first yellowfin tuna farm near the mouth of the Golfo Dulce. The tuna farm as planned would pollute the area, endanger sea turtles, affect the existing fish population, and threaten the world-class wave. A lawsuit was filed just in time, and the project was successfully stalled. Thus began an unlikely alliance of local surfers, fishermen, and global environmental groups to save a wave and one of the most biodiverse places on the planet. In The Battle for Paradise, Jeremy Evans travels to Pavones to uncover the story of how this ragtag group stood up to a multinational company and how a shadowy figure from the town’s violent past became an unlikely hero. In this harrowing but ultimately inspiring story, Evans focuses in turn on a colorful cast of characters with an unyielding love for the ocean and surfing, a company’s unscrupulous efforts to expand profits, and a government that nearly sold out the perfect wave.
Categories: History

A Portal to Paradise

A Portal to Paradise

... major general the year before Custer's early retirement at Little Bighorn . Looking down Turkey Creek Canyon from near its head . [ 48 ] The First Gringos.

Author: Alden C. Hayes

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 0816521441

Category: History

Page: 424

View: 481

Arizona's rugged Chiricahua Mountains have a special place in frontier history. They were the haven of many well-known personalities, from Cochise to Johnny Ringo, as well as the home of prospectors, cattlemen, and hardscrabble farmers eking out a tough living in an unforgiving landscape. In this delightful and well-researched book, Alden Hayes shares his love for the area, gained over fifty years. From his vantage point near the tiny twin communities of Portal and Paradise on the eastern slopes of the Chiricahuas, Hayes brings the famous and the not-so-famous together in a profile of this striking landscape, showing how place can be a powerful formative influence on people's lives. When Hayes first arrived in 1941 to manage his new father-in-law's apple orchard, he met folks who had been born in Arizona before it became a state. Even if most had never personally worried about Indian attacks, they had known people who had. Over the years, Hayes heard the handed-down stories about the area's early days of Anglo settlement. He also researched census records, newspaper archives, and the files of the Arizona Historical Society to uncover the area's natural history, prehistory, Spanish and Mexican regimes, and particularly its Anglo history from the mid nineteenth century to the beginning of World War II. His book is a rich account of the region and more, a celebration of rural life, brimming with tales of people whose stories were shaped by the landscape. Today the Chiricahuas are a magnet for outdoor enthusiasts and the site of the American Museum of Natural History's Southwestern Research StationÑand still a rugged area that remains off the beaten track. Hayes brings his straightforward and articulate style to this captivating account of earlier days in southeastern Arizona and opens up a portal to paradise for readers everywhere.
Categories: History