Shakespeare Eugene O Neill T S Eliot and the Greek Tragedy

Shakespeare  Eugene O Neill  T S  Eliot and the Greek Tragedy

8 From Shakespeare to Modern Tragic Drama Shakespeare had explored almost all the possibilities of tragic drama from Julius ... The point with which this work began - Steiner's assertion that pure tragedy was practised only by the Greek ...

Author: R.R. Khare

Publisher: Mittal Publications

ISBN: 8170995582

Category: Greek drama (Tragedy)

Page: 564

View: 594

Categories: Greek drama (Tragedy)

Greek Tragedy

Greek Tragedy

multiplicity of tragedy, to rock concerts or sporting events to give us the sense of mass appeal and the outdoor experience. The form of Greek tragedy is what was most distinctive about it, yet it is for the stories that we return to ...

Author: Nancy Sorkin Rabinowitz

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780470693261

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 232

View: 134

Greek Tragedy sets ancient tragedy into its original theatrical, political and ritual context and applies modern critical approaches to understanding why tragedy continues to interest modern audiences. An engaging introduction to Greek tragedy, its history, and its reception in the contemporary world with suggested readings for further study Examines tragedy’s relationship to democracy, religion, and myth Explores contemporary approaches to scholarship, including structuralist, psychoanalytic, and feminist theory Provides a thorough examination of contemporary performance practices Includes detailed readings of selected plays
Categories: Literary Criticism

Greek Tragedy

Greek Tragedy

modernism ofBertold Brecht, all consciously turnback tothe theatreof Greece, to rediscoverthe power of tragedy for a contemporary society. The history of modern drama starts with Greek tragedy, and keeps returning to it.

Author: Aeschylus

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 9780141961712

Category: Drama

Page: 352

View: 104

Agememnon is the first part of the Aeschylus's Orestian trilogy in which the leader of the Greek army returns from the Trojan war to be murdered by his treacherous wife Clytemnestra. In Sophocles' Oedipus Rex the king sets out to uncover the cause of the plague that has struck his city, only to disover the devastating truth about his relationship with his mother and his father. Medea is the terrible story of a woman's bloody revenge on her adulterous husband through the murder of her own children.
Categories: Drama

Greek Tragedy

Greek Tragedy

Greek Tragedy, and although that city has always enjoyed a lively theatrical culture, ancient Greek plays were not, in Kitto's day, often performed. But he brought to his reading of the tragedies a variety of unusual perspectives which ...

Author: H.D.F. Kitto

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781136806902

Category: History

Page: 361

View: 277

'Two things give Kitto's classic book its enduring freshness: he pioneered the approach to Greek drama through internal artistry and thematic form, and he always wrote in lively and readable English.' - Oliver Taplin, University of Oxford, UK Why did Aeschylus characterize differently from Sophocles? Why did Sophocles introduce the third actor? Why did Euripides not make better plots? So asks H.D.F Kitto in his acclaimed study of Greek tragedy, available for the first time in Routledge Classics. Kitto argues that in spite of dealing with big moral and intellectual questions, the Greek dramatist is above all an artist and the key to understanding classical Greek drama is to try and understand the tragic conception of each play. In Kitto’s words ‘We shall ask what the dramatist is striving to say, not what in fact he does say about this or that.’ Through a brilliant analysis of Aeschylus’s ‘Oresteia’, the plays of Sophocles including ‘Antigone’ and ‘Oedipus Tyrannus’; and Euripides’s ‘Medea’ and ‘Hecuba’, Kitto skilfully conveys the enduring artistic and literary brilliance of the Greek dramatists. H.D.F Kitto (1897 – 1982) was a renowned British classical scholar. He lectured at the University of Glasgow from 1920-1944 before becoming Professor of Greek at Bristol University, where he taught until 1962.
Categories: History

Interpreting Greek Tragedy

Interpreting Greek Tragedy

30 The seventy-year period Uust two generations) spanned by extant Greek tragedy, which represents its mature creative phase, is clearly such a moment. The passage from one mode of social discourse to another includes the development of ...

Author: Charles Segal

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9781501746703

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 385

View: 880

This generous selection of published essays by the distinguished classicist Charles Segal represents over twenty years of critical inquiry into the questions of what Greek tragedy is and what it means for modern-day readers. Taken together, the essays reflect profound changes in the study of Greek tragedy in the United States during this period-in particular, the increasing emphasis on myth, psychoanalytic interpretation, structuralism, and semiotics.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Adapting Greek Tragedy

Adapting Greek Tragedy

In her 'Adaptations of Greek Tragedies in Non-Western Performance Cultures', Fischer-Lichte explores and analyses the increasing interest (by scholars and theatre practitioners alike) in associations between Greek and non-Western ...

Author: Vayos Liapis

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107155701

Category: Art

Page: 447

View: 749

Shows how contemporary adaptations, on the stage and on the page, can breathe new life into Greek tragedy.
Categories: Art

Greek Tragedy

Greek Tragedy

B. M. W. Knox, The Heroic Temper: Studies in Sophoclean Tragedy (Berkeley, Calif., 1964). A. A. Long, Language and Thought in Sophocles (London, ... E. R. Dodds, 'On misunderstanding the Oedipus Rex', Greece and Rome 13 (1966), 37–49.

Author: Edith Hall

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199232512

Category: Drama

Page: 428

View: 964

An illustrated introduction to ancient Greek tragedy, written by one of its most distinguished experts, which provides all the background information necessary for understanding the context and content of the dramas. A special feature is an individual essay on every one of the surviving 33 plays.
Categories: Drama

Children in Greek Tragedy

Children in Greek Tragedy

'What We Must Believe in Greek Tragedy', Ramus 28:75–88. Konstan, D. 1999b. Pity and Self-Pity', Electronic Antiquity 5.2 (http://scholar.lib.vt. edu/ejournals/ElAnt/V5N2/konstan.html). Konstan, D. 2000. Pity and the law in Greek theory ...

Author: Emma M. Griffiths

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198826071

Category: History

Page: 337

View: 609

Astyanax is thrown from the walls of Troy; Medeia kills her children as an act of vengeance against her husband; Aias reflects with sorrow on his son's inheritance, yet kills himself and leaves Eurysakes vulnerable to his enemies. The pathos created by threats to children is a notable feature of Greek tragedy, but does not in itself explain the broad range of situations in which the ancient playwrights chose to employ such threats. Rather than casting children in tragedy as simple figures of pathos, this volume proposes a new paradigm to understand their roles, emphasizing their dangerous potential as the future adults of myth. Although they are largely silent, passive figures on stage, children exert a dramatic force that transcends their limited physical presence, and are in fact theatrically complex creations who pose a danger to the major characters. Their multiple projected lives create dramatic palimpsests which are paradoxically more significant than their immediate emotional effects: children are never killed because of their immediate weakness, but because of their potential strength. This re-evaluation of the significance of child characters in Greek tragedy draws on a fresh examination of the evidence for child actors in fifth-century Athens, which concludes that the physical presence of children was a significant factor in their presentation. However, child roles can only be fully appreciated as theatrical phenomena, utilizing the inherent ambiguities of drama: as such, case studies of particular plays and playwrights are underpinned by detailed analysis of staging considerations, opening up new avenues for interpretation and challenging traditional models of children in tragedy.
Categories: History

Moral Awareness in Greek Tragedy

Moral Awareness in Greek Tragedy

——(2001), Oedipus Tyrannus: Tragic Heroism and the Limits of Knowledge (2nd edn.) (New York). Segal, E. (ed.) (1968), Euripides: A Collection of Critical Essays (Englewood Cliffs, NJ). ——(1983), Oxford Readings in Greek Tragedy (Oxford) ...

Author: Stuart Lawrence

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780199659760

Category: Drama

Page: 347

View: 296

Lawrence's volume provides a detailed discussion and analyses of the moral awareness of major characters in Greek tragedy, focusing particularly on the characters' recognition of moral issues and crises, their ability to reflect on them, and their consciousness of doing so. Beginning with a definition of morality and examining the implications of analysing the moral performance of fictional characters, Lawrence considers concepts of the self and the problem of autonomy and personal responsibility in the context of divine intervention, which is a crucial feature of the genre. The volume then moves on to the individual plays (Aeschylus' Seven Against Thebes and Oresteia; Sophocles' Ajax, Trachiniae, Oedipus Tyrannus, Electra, and Philoctetes; and Euripides' Medea, Hecuba, Hippolytus, Heracles, Electra, and Bacchae), focusing in each case on a crisis or crises faced by a major character and examining the background which led to it. Lawrence then considers the individual character's moral response and relates it to the critical issues formulated in the volume's opening discussions. The book will be important to any student of Classical Studies and those in Philosophy or Literature interested in a theoretical discussion of the morality of literary characters.
Categories: Drama

Achilles in Greek Tragedy

Achilles in Greek Tragedy

Garland , R. ( 1982 ) ' Geras Thanonton : An Investigation into the Claims of the Homeric Dead ' , BICS 29 : 69-80 Garner , R. ( 1989 ) From Homer to Tragedy : the Art of Allusion in Greek Poetry , London ( 1993 ) ' Achilles in Locri ...

Author: Pantelis Michelakis

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521038928

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 372

This study examines how one of the most popular and glamorous figures of Greek mythology was imagined on the tragic stage of fifth-century Athens. Dr Michelakis argues that dramatists persistently appropriated Achilles to address concerns of their time, from heroism and education to individualism and gender. Whether an aristocrat, a dead warrior or a young man, the tragic Achilles serves as a receptacle for competing definitions of heroism, oscillating between presence and absence, the exceptional and the paradigmatic. Tragedy draws on Achilles to display and pit against one another contrasting views of the mythological self and of its rights and obligations, powers and limitations. The book considers the whole corpus of extant Greek tragedy, with particular attention paid to Aeschylus' Myrmidons and Euripides' Hecuba and Iphigenia at Aulis.
Categories: History