Greek Theatre in the Fourth Century BC

Greek Theatre in the Fourth Century BC

Past scholarship described the fourth century BC as an age of theatrical decline. This book, the first to explore all aspects of fourth-century theatre, reveals it to be an epoch of unparalelled expansion and innovation.

Author: Eric Csapo

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110337556

Category: History

Page: 590

View: 338

Age-old scholarly dogma holds that the death of serious theatre went hand-in-hand with the 'death' of the city-state and that the fourth century BC ushered in an era of theatrical mediocrity offering shallow entertainment to a depoliticised citizenry. The traditional view of fourth-century culture is encouraged and sustained by the absence of dramatic texts in anything more than fragments. Until recently, little attention was paid to an enormous array of non-literary evidence attesting, not only the sustained vibrancy of theatrical culture, but a huge expansion of theatre throughout (and even beyond) the Greek world. Epigraphic, historiographic, iconographic and archaeological evidence indicates that the fourth century BC was an age of exponential growth in theatre. It saw: the construction of permanent stone theatres across and beyond the Mediterranean world; the addition of theatrical events to existing festivals; the creation of entirely new contexts for drama; and vast investment, both public and private, in all areas of what was rapidly becoming a major 'industry'. This is the first book to explore all the evidence for fourth century ancient theatre: its architecture, drama, dissemination, staging, reception, politics, social impact, finance and memorialisation.
Categories: History

The Chorus of Drama in the Fourth Century BCE

The Chorus of Drama in the Fourth Century BCE

(Curtius 9.6.25): The Macedonian Kings and Greek Theatre', in E. Csapo, et al. (eds), Greek Theatre in the Fourth Century BC (Berlin; Boston), 231–49. Moretti, J.-C. (2014), 'The Evolution of Theatre Architecture Outside Athens in the ...

Author: Lucy C. M. M. Jackson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192582881

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 304

View: 221

The Chorus of Drama in the Fourth Century BCE seeks to upend conventional thinking about the development of drama from the fifth to the fourth centuries and to provide a new way of talking and thinking about the choruses of drama after the deaths of Euripides and Sophocles. Set in the context of a theatre industry extending far beyond the confines of the City Dionysia and the city of Athens, the identity of choral performers and the significance of their contribution to the shape and meaning of drama in the later Classical period (c.400-323) as a whole is an intriguing and under-explored area of enquiry. This volume draws together the fourth-century historical, material, dramatic, literary, and philosophical sources that attest to the activity and quality of dramatic choruses and, having considered the positive evidence for dramatic choral activity, provides a radical rethinking of two oft-cited yet ill-understood phenomena that have traditionally supported the idea that the chorus of drama 'declined' in the fourth century: the inscription of χοŕο*u~ με ́λο*s in papyri and manuscripts in place of fully written-out choral odes, and Aristotle's invocation of embolima (Poetics 1456a25-32). It also explores the important role of influential fourth-century authors such as Plato, Demosthenes, and Xenophon, as well as artistic representations of choruses on fourth-century monuments, in shaping later scholars' understanding of the dramatic chorus throughout the Classical period, reaching conclusions that have significant implications for the broader story we wish to tell about Attic drama and its most enigmatic and fundamental element, the chorus.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Comic Body in Ancient Greek Theatre and Art 440 320 BCE

The Comic Body in Ancient Greek Theatre and Art  440 320 BCE

Genre Transformation in Greek Comedy', in M. DEPEW (eds.), Matrices of Genre: Authors, ... E. CSAPO 2010a, Actors and Icons of the Ancient Theater (Chichester, Malden). ... 2014, Greek Theatre in the Fourth Century BCE (Berlin, Boston).

Author: Alexa Piqueux

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192845542

Category: Art, Greek

Page: 384

View: 871

Using both textual and iconographic sources, this richly illustrated book examines the representations of the body in Greek Old and Middle Comedy, how it was staged, perceived, and imagined, particularly in Athens, Magna Graecia, and Sicily. The study also aims to refine knowledge of the various connections between Attic comedy and comic vases from South Italy and Sicily (the so-called 'phlyax vases').0After introducing comic texts and comedy-related vase-paintings in the regional contexts, The Comic Body in Ancient Greek Theatre and Art, 440-320 BCE considers the generic features of the comic body, characterized as it is by a specific ugliness and a constant motion. It also explores how costumes -masks, padding, phallus, clothing, accessories- and gestures contribute to the characters' visual identity in relation with speech : it analyzes the cultural, social, aesthetic, and theatrical conventions by which spectators decipher the body. This study thus leads to a re-examination of the modalities of comic mimesis, in particular when addressing sexual codes in cross-dressing scenes which reveal the artifice of the fictional body. It also sheds light on how comic poets make use of the scenic or imaginary representations of the bodies of those who are targets of political, social, or intellectual satire. There is a particular emphasis on body movements, where the book not only deals with body language and the dramatic function of comic gesture, but also with how words confer a kind of poetic and unreal motion to the body.
Categories: Art, Greek

Theatre in Ancient Greek Society

Theatre in Ancient Greek Society

This is the first study examining the function and impact of the theatre in ancient Greek society by employing an archaeological approach.

Author: J. R. Green

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134968800

Category: History

Page: 262

View: 867

In Theatre in Ancient Greek Society the author examines the social setting and function of ancient Greek theatre through the thousand years of its performance history. Instead of using written sources, which were intended only for a small, educated section of the population, he draws most of his evidence from a wide range of archaeological material - from cheap, mass-produced vases and figurines to elegant silverware produced for the dining tables of the wealthy. This is the first study examining the function and impact of the theatre in ancient Greek society by employing an archaeological approach.
Categories: History

A Cultural History of Tragedy in Antiquity

A Cultural History of Tragedy in Antiquity

G.M. Sifakis, “ The Misunderstanding of Opsis in Aristotle's Poetics, ” in Performance in Greek and Roman Theatre , ed. ... Reperforming Greek Tragedy, Theater, Politics, and Cultural Mobility in the Fifth and Fourth Centuries BC ...

Author: Emily Wilson

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350154889

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 678

In this volume, tragedy in antiquity is examined synoptically, from its misty origins in archaic Greece, through its central position in the civic life of ancient Athens and its performances across the Greek-speaking world, to its new and very different instantiations in Republican and Imperial Roman contexts. Lively, original essays by eminent scholars trace the shifting dramatic forms, performance environments, and social meanings of tragedy as it was repeatedly reinvented. Tragedy was consistently seen as the most serious of all dramatic genres; these essays trace a sequence of different visions of what the most serious kind of dramatic story might be, and the most appropriate ways of telling those stories on stage. Each chapter takes a different theme as its focus: forms and media; sites of performance and circulation; communities of production and consumption; philosophy and social theory; religion, ritual, and myth; politics of city and nation; society and family, and gender and sexuality.
Categories: History

The Architecture of the Ancient Greek Theatre

The Architecture of the Ancient Greek Theatre

We refer colleagues to important bibliographies to be found in for example: Csapo et al., The Greek Theatre in the Fourth Century B.C. (Berlin 2014), I. Nielsen, Cultic Theatres and Ritual Drama (Aarhus 2002) and F. Sear, ...

Author: Rune Frederiksen

Publisher: Aarhus Universitetsforlag

ISBN: 9788771249965

Category: Architecture

Page: 468

View: 411

This book is a collection of papers following the conference The Architecture of the Ancient Greek Theatre, held in Athens in January 2012. Fundamental publications on the topic have not been issued for many years. Bringing together the leading experts on theatre architecture, this conference aimed at introducing new facts and important comprehensive studies on Greek theatres to the public. The published volume is, first of all, a presentation of new excavation results and new analyses of individual monuments. Many well-known theatres such as the one of Dionysos in Athens, and others at Dodone, Corinth, and Sikyon have been re-examined since their original publication, with stunning results. New research, presented in this volume, includes moreover less well known, or even newly found, ancient Greek theatres in Albania, Asia Minor, Cyprus, and Sicily. Further studies on the history of research, on regional theatrical developments, terminology, and function, as well as a perspective on Roman theatres built in Greek traditions make this volume a comprehensive volume of new research for expert scholars as well as for students and the interested public.
Categories: Architecture

A Handbook to the Reception of Greek Drama

A Handbook to the Reception of Greek Drama

Pots and Plays: Interactions between Tragedy and Greek Vase‐Painting of the Fourth Century B.C. Los Angeles: J. Paul Getty Museum. Taplin, Oliver. 2012 “How Was Athenian Tragedy Played in the Greek West?” In Theatre Outside Athens: ...

Author: Betine van Zyl Smit

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118347775

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 624

View: 352

A Handbook to the Reception of Greek Drama offers a series of original essays that represent a comprehensive overview of the global reception of ancient Greek tragedies and comedies from antiquity to the present day. Represents the first volume to offer a complete overview of the reception of ancient drama from antiquity to the present Covers the translation, transmission, performance, production, and adaptation of Greek tragedy from the time the plays were first created in ancient Athens through the 21st century Features overviews of the history of the reception of Greek drama in most countries of the world Includes chapters covering the reception of Greek drama in modern opera and film
Categories: Literary Criticism

Ancient and Medieval Theatre

Ancient and Medieval Theatre

There are many other extant Greek theatres , of course , and archaeologists have excavated more than sixty - five of ... This the- atre , built in the fourth century B.c. and the best preserved of all ancient Greek theatres , features a ...

Author: Ronald W. Vince

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 0313241074

Category: History

Page: 182

View: 722

Review of medieval dramatic texts S.131-149.
Categories: History

Beyond the Fifth Century

Beyond the Fifth Century

The volume breaks new ground in several ways. Its chronological scope encompasses periods that are not usually part of research on tragedy reception, especially the Hellenistic period, late antiquity and the Middle Ages.

Author: Ingo Gildenhard

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 9783110223781

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 449

View: 252

Beyond the Fifth Century brings together 13 scholars from various disciplines (Classics, Ancient History, Mediaeval Studies) to explore interactions with Greek tragedy from the 4th century BC up to the Middle Ages. The volume breaks new ground in several ways: in its chronological scope, the various modes of reception considered, the pervasive interest in interactions between tragedy and society-at-large, and the fact that some studies are of a comparative nature.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Greek drama

Greek drama

That this period is the fourth century B. C. is shown by three facts : ( 1 ) No ruins in Athens constructed as these are belong to a period prior to the fourth century . ( 2 ) At the point A in the supportiug - wall of the cavea are ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: HARVARD:32044018101022

Category:

Page: 790

View: 282

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