Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics

Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics

Depth, accuracy, relevancy and up-to-date presentation make this intermediate Greek grammar the finest available.

Author: Daniel B. Wallace

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0310218950

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 827

View: 481

Depth, accuracy, relevancy and up-to-date presentation make this intermediate Greek grammar the finest available. Written by a world-class authority on textual criticism, it links grammar and exegesis to provide today's second-year Greek student with solid exegetical and linguistic foundations.
Categories: Foreign Language Study

Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics Video Lectures

Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics Video Lectures

Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics Video Lectures---a companion to the textbooks, Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics and The Basics of New Testament Syntax, by Daniel B. Wallace---provides 30 lectures, each corresponding to a section in the ...

Author: Daniel B. Wallace

Publisher:

ISBN: 0310534097

Category:

Page:

View: 333

Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics Video Lectures---a companion to the textbooks, Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics and The Basics of New Testament Syntax, by Daniel B. Wallace---provides 30 lectures, each corresponding to a section in the textbooks. The lectures introduce second-year Greek students to syntax and exegesis of the Greek New Testament.
Categories:

A Workbook for New Testament Syntax

A Workbook for New Testament Syntax

This workbook, designed to accompany both books, presents a dynamic approach to learning Greek syntax.

Author: Daniel B. Wallace

Publisher: Zondervan

ISBN: 9780310874270

Category: Religion

Page: 192

View: 443

Daniel B. Wallace’s groundbreaking books Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament and Basics of New Testament Syntax have become the standard textbooks among colleges and seminaries for teaching New Testament Greek syntax. This workbook, designed to accompany both books, presents a dynamic approach to learning Greek syntax. Instead of simply learning syntax in single-verse snippets, students are exposed to all of the major syntactical categories in exegetically and theologically significant passages.
Categories: Religion

The Basics of New Testament Syntax

The Basics of New Testament Syntax

The Basics of New Testament Syntax provides concise, up-to-date guidance for intermediate Greek students to do accurate exegesis of biblical texts.

Author: Daniel B. Wallace

Publisher: Zondervan

ISBN: 9780310321576

Category: Religion

Page: 336

View: 874

The Basics of New Testament Syntax provides concise, up-to-date guidance for intermediate Greek students to do accurate exegesis of biblical texts. Abridged from Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament, the popular exegetical Greek grammar for studies in Greek by Daniel B. Wallace, The Basics of New Testament Syntax offers a practical grammar for second-year students.The strengths of this abridgment will become quickly apparent to the user:• It shows the relevance of syntax for exegesis and is thoroughly cross-referenced to Exegetical Syntax.• It includes an exceptional number of categories useful for intermediate Greek studies.• It is easy to use. Each semantic category is discussed, and a definition and key to identification are provided.• Scores of charts and tables are included to enable the intermediate student to grasp the material quickly.
Categories: Religion

New Testament Greek Syntax Laminated Sheet

New Testament Greek Syntax Laminated Sheet

This summary laminated sheet of Greek Grammar beyond the Basics and Basics of New Testament Syntax is perfect for students to review categories of uses and look over possibilities when doing exegesis of the New Testament.

Author: Daniel B. Wallace

Publisher: Zondervan

ISBN: 9780310108290

Category: Religion

Page: 6

View: 190

This summary laminated sheet of Greek Grammar beyond the Basics and Basics of New Testament Syntax is perfect for students to review categories of uses and look over possibilities when doing exegesis of the New Testament.
Categories: Religion

Granville Sharp s Canon and Its Kin

Granville Sharp s Canon and Its Kin

This book includes a detailed examination of the New Testament data and other Ancient Greek literature, which reveals that Sharp’s rule has a general validity in the language.

Author: Daniel B. Wallace

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 082043342X

Category: Religion

Page: 347

View: 526

Granville Sharp’s Canon and Its Kin explains that the semantics of the article-substantive-KAI-substantive construction (TSKS) have been largely misunderstood and that this misunderstanding has adversely impacted the exegesis of several theologically significant texts. This issue is addressed from three angles: historical investigation, linguistic-phenomenological analysis of the construction, and exegetical implications. The reasons for the misunderstanding are traced historically; a better comprehension of the semantics of the construction is established by an examination of primary literature in the light of linguistic theory; and the implications of this analysis are applied to a number of passages in the New Testament. Historically, the treatment begins with a clear grammatical principle articulated by Granville Sharp, and it ends with the present-day confusion. This book includes a detailed examination of the New Testament data and other Ancient Greek literature, which reveals that Sharp’s rule has a general validity in the language. Lastly, a number of exegetically significant texts that are affected by the linguistic-phenomenological investigation are discussed in detail. This enlightening text is a valuable resource for undergraduate and graduate students of religion, linguistics, history, and Greek.
Categories: Religion

Biblical Greek Exegesis

Biblical Greek Exegesis

In contrast, Biblical Greek Exegesis stresses "real-life" application. Beginning with selections from the Greek New Testament, students learn intermediate and advanced Greek grammar inductively by analyzing the text.

Author: George H. Guthrie

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0310212464

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 173

View: 429

Biblical Greek Exegesis presents a proven, highly practical approach to the study of intermediate and advanced Greek grammar. Most textbooks focus on learning syntactical categories, illustrated by sentences taken from the Greek New Testament, and place little emphasis on how to apply Greek grammar to the Greek text in preparing sermons and lectures. In contrast, Biblical Greek Exegesis stresses "real-life" application. Beginning with selections from the Greek New Testament, students learn intermediate and advanced Greek grammar inductively by analyzing the text. The process closely resembles the approach used in sermon and lecture preparation. In Part 1 (SYNTAX), students work through nine selections from the New Testament, taken from the Gospels, Paul's letters (including Romans), and the General Letters. The selections are arranged in order of increasing difficulty. The student becomes familiar with syntactical categories through translation, grammatical analysis, and grammatical diagramming, supplemented by class discussion. Equally important, the length of these selections allows for semantic diagramming and analysis. This provides a tool for analyzing larger units of meaning, which is not possible when working only with sentences that illustrate specific points of grammar. In Part 2 (EXEGESIS), the student takes the sections from the Greek New Testament through a twelve-step method of exegesis and exposition. The student works through one section of approximately fifteen verses every two weeks, beginning with the first step--spiritual preparation--and ending with application and a preaching/teaching outline. This approach has two benefits. Advanced Greek students learn to use the Greek text and grammar as they will in the "real world." They also learn to integrate other significant areas such as literary form and textual criticism, as well as the use of exegetical tools. In short, they become better expositors of the Word of God. Bibliographies are provided for each of the twelve steps in the exegetical process. Also included is a summary of syntactical categories based on Wallace's Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics. This successfully field-tested approach to intermediate and advanced Greek will help students bridge the gap between understanding the categories of Greek grammar and the demand to communicate the meaning and significance of the New Testament message to the twenty-first century.
Categories: Foreign Language Study

Elementary New Testament Greek

Elementary New Testament Greek

The digital copies of this book is available for free at First Fruits website. place.asburyseminary.edu/firstfruits Under Revision: This grammar has already undergone numbers of revisions over the last 4 years, for which I must thank Mr. ...

Author: Joseph Dongell

Publisher: First Fruits Press

ISBN: 1621711498

Category: Bible

Page: 238

View: 836

The digital copies of this book is available for free at First Fruits website. place.asburyseminary.edu/firstfruits Under Revision: This grammar has already undergone numbers of revisions over the last 4 years, for which I must thank Mr. Brad Johnson (model language instructor) and his students for their fine-toothed combing of the text. This present publication, the first effort to combine the two semesters of elementary Greek instruction into one volume with full appendices, represents the first half of a full revision. Chapters 1-12 have been brought up the standards of the most recent suggestions. Chapters 13-24 await this latest wave of modification, with all chapters together scheduled to be in their fully revised form by February of 2015. My special thanks goes to Mr. Klay Harrison, whose expertise and enthusiasm for this labor is stamped on every page. Preface: The world does not another Elementary Greek Grammar There are many fine products on the market that have proven themselves to be useful both in the classroom and for private instruction. The need for this particular grammar arises from the peculiar shape of the MDiv curriculum at Asbury Theological Seminary. Several years ago the faculty adopted a curriculum that required one semester of Greek and one semester of Hebrew, each as preparatory for a basic exegesis course in each discipline. It became clear after several years of trial and error that a "lexical" or "tools" approach to learning Greek and Hebrew was inadequate, no matter how skilled the instructors or how motivated the students. In today's general vacuum of grammatical training in public education across the United States, students typically enter seminary training with no knowledge of how languages work. Any training we might give them in accessing grammatical information through the use of Bible software programs will, we learned, come to naught in the absence of an understanding of just what such information actually means. We agreed that we actually needed to "teach the language itself," at least in some rudimentary fashion, if we hoped students would make sense of grammatical and linguistic issues involved biblical interpretation. The first 12 chapters of this grammar are designed to correspond to the first semester's instructional agenda. In these chapters we introduce all the parts of speech, explain and drill the basic elements of grammar, set forth the larger verb system (excluding the perfect system), teach the tenses of the Indicative Mood only (again, excluding the perfect system), and help students build a vocabulary of all NT words occurring 100 times or more. We also lead students into the NT itself with carefully chosen examples, while at the same time guiding them in each lesson to learn the use of the standard NT lexicon BDAG] and an exegetical grammar Wallace's Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics]. We are well aware of the limitations of this approach, but genuinely believe that some instruction along these lines is better than none, and that such an approach provide a foundation for students interested in moving beyond the first semester (into chapters 13-24) into a firmer grasp of the language of the NT
Categories: Bible

The Greek Verb Revisited

The Greek Verb Revisited

... “in bloom”). See, e.g., Porter, Verbal Aspect, 91; Porter, Idioms of the Greek
New Testament, 2nd ed. BLG 2 (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic, 1994), 24; Daniel
B. Wallace, Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the ...

Author: Steven E. Runge

Publisher: Lexham Press

ISBN: 9781577996378

Category: Religion

Page: 688

View: 170

For the past 25 years, debate regarding the nature of tense and aspect in the Koine Greek verb has held New Testament studies at an impasse. The Greek Verb Revisited examines recent developments from the field of linguistics, which may dramatically shift the direction of this discussion. Readers will find an accessible introduction to the foundational issues, and more importantly, they will discover a way forward through the debate. Originally presented during a conference on the Greek verb supported by and held at Tyndale House and sponsored by the Faculty of Divinity of Cambridge University, the papers included in this collection represent the culmination of scholarly collaboration. The outcome is a practical and accessible overview of the Greek verb that moves beyond the current impasse by taking into account the latest scholarship from the fields of linguistics, Classics, and New Testament studies.
Categories: Religion

An Interpretive Lexicon of New Testament Greek

An Interpretive Lexicon of New Testament Greek

First, this book lists the vast majority of Greek prepositions, adverbs, particles, relative pronouns, conjunctions, and other connecting words that are notorious for being some of the most difficult words to translate.

Author: Gregory K. Beale

Publisher: Zondervan Academic

ISBN: 9780310516651

Category: Religion

Page: 96

View: 438

This Interpretive Lexicon has two primary functions aimed at facilitating the exegetical and translational task, namely as a lexicon and also as an interpretive handbook. First, this book lists the vast majority of Greek prepositions, adverbs, particles, relative pronouns, conjunctions, and other connecting words that are notorious for being some of the most difficult words to translate. For each word included, page references are given for several major lexical resources where the user can quickly go to examine the nuances and parameters of the word for translation options. This book will save considerable time for students of the Greek New Testament text. For example, for the Greek preposition en (occurs 2,750 times in the New Testament) covers four pages of small print in the Bauer-Danker lexicon (BDAG). But Interpretive Lexicon digests those pages in just a few lines, with the page numbers and section references given for A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature, 3rd Edition (BDAG, ’00) and 2nd Edition (BAGD, ’79), Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics (Daniel B. Wallace), and Prepositions and Theology in the Greek New Testament (Murray J. Harris). Thus, the translation options can be analyzed quickly. For words with a lower frequency of occurrence and fewer translation options, this book may be sufficient in itself as a lexicon. Secondly, these prepositions, conjunctions, adverbs, and connecting words in Greek, as in every language, function as explicit discourse-level markers that are essential for ascertaining the main point(s) of a passage. Therefore, this Interpretive Lexicon also evaluates the discourse function(s) of each word that is defined and catalogued, and categorizes its semantic range into defined logical relationships. This feature of the lexicon adds an interpretive element, since translation must include interpretation, at least on a linguistic level. For example, en may be translated in many ways, but those ways are categorized broadly in this book into relationships such as locative (in, among, on), means-end (with, by), grounds (because, on account of), temporal (while, at), and so on. This interpretive feature of the book is tremendously helpful for the exegetical process, allowing for the translator to closely follow the logical flow of the text with greater efficiency. This Interpretive Lexicon is thus a remarkable resource for student, pastor, and scholar alike.
Categories: Religion

The Essentials of Greek Grammar

The Essentials of Greek Grammar

In part 1 of the volume, Pratt covers the following: morphology and parts of speech in increasing order of complexity, from articles and pronouns through adjectives; active and passive participles; nouns, with a summary of endings and ...

Author: Louise Pratt

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806186214

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 156

View: 604

Designed for intermediate-level students, this textbook presents an outline of the essential forms and syntax of ancient Attic Greek. A perfect supplement to Louise Pratt’s Eros at the Banquet, it also stands alone as a useful resource for any student seeking to move beyond the basics of Greek into the exciting experience of reading classical literature in its original language. The Essentials of Greek Grammar is based on the author’s many years of classroom experience and on the handouts she developed and fine-tuned to supplement a variety of textbooks and approaches. In part 1 of the volume, Pratt covers the following: morphology and parts of speech in increasing order of complexity, from articles and pronouns through adjectives; active and passive participles; nouns, with a summary of endings and examples of the three declensions; verbs, with summaries and examples of regular and irregular forms. Part 2 presents syntax, moving from the relatively straightforward case uses of nouns and pronouns, to the uses and positions of adjectives and the complexities of verb types and moods. Pratt also includes miscellaneous figures of speech and a handy appendix listing two hundred common Attic verbs and their principal parts.
Categories: Foreign Language Study

A Graded Reader of Biblical Greek

A Graded Reader of Biblical Greek

Appendix A : Partial Summary of Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics : An
Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament Daniel B. Wallace I cannot thank my
friend Dan Wallace enough for allowing me to include my summary of his Greek
Grammar ...

Author: William D. Mounce

Publisher: Zondervan

ISBN: 0310205824

Category: Religion

Page: 206

View: 328

This companion to Basics of Biblical Greek and Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics contains annotated readings from the New Testament designed for second-year students of the Greek language.
Categories: Religion

The New Linguistic and Exegetical Key to the Greek New Testament

The New Linguistic and Exegetical Key to the Greek New Testament

This verse by verse analysis of unusual forms and grammatical and exegetical difficulties in the Greek New Testament is expanded and revised, improving on the acclaimed original version.

Author: Cleon L. Rogers

Publisher: Zondervan

ISBN: 0310201756

Category: Bibles

Page: 652

View: 453

This verse by verse analysis of unusual forms and grammatical and exegetical difficulties in the Greek New Testament is expanded and revised, improving on the acclaimed original version.
Categories: Bibles

Luke 6 40 and the Theme of Likeness Education in the New Testament

Luke 6 40 and the Theme of Likeness Education in the New Testament

166 The action described by the future perfect participle must precede the result (
or, state).167 Aspect in Greek does not ... in the NT, and (2) the perfect “is always
to be taken as passive in the NT” (Greek Grammar, Beyond the Basics, 418).

Author: Thomas W. Hudgins

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781630872625

Category: Religion

Page: 308

View: 433

What does Jesus mean when he says, A disciple is not above his teacher, but each disciple, after being fully trained, will be like his teacher (Luke 6:40)? This verse has been quoted, cited, and referenced in vast amounts of Christian education and discipleship literature. Nevertheless, the verse is nearly untouched in exegetical discussions with the exception of source-critical analyses. From this verse arises an undeveloped theme in the Gospel of Luke and the New Testament--the theme of likeness education. Using content analysis methodology, Luke 6:40--one of the keystone passages in Christian education literature--serves as the starting point for mining out the theme of likeness education in the New Testament. This study consists of three concentric areas of investigation: (1) Luke 6:40 and its immediate context, (2) Luke-Acts, and (3) the New Testament corpus.
Categories: Religion

HCSB Bible Translation

HCSB   Bible Translation

... consult commentaries, articles, and especially works on Greek syntax such as
Daniel B. Wallace, Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics (Grand Rapids:
Zondervan, 1996); Stanley E. Porter, Idioms of the Greek New Testament (
Sheffield: JSOT, ...

Author: E. Ray Clendenen

Publisher: B&H Publishing Group

ISBN: 9781433614767

Category: Religion

Page: 224

View: 247

In Genesis 3:1 the serpent asked the woman, "Did God really say, 'You can't eat from any tree in the garden'?" What has God really said? Before we can obey Him, we must know what He has said. The Psalmist prayed twice in his affliction, "Give me life through Your word" (Ps 119:25, 107). When Jesus was afflicted by the Devil in the wilderness (Mt 4:1-11), He defended Himself with the sword of the Spirit (Eph 6:17) - God's Word. But Christians must know what God has said if we are to find strength and healing from affliction and defense against the Devil. Bible translation is not a casual enterprise because it involves bringing the life-saving Word of God to people in their own language. And selecting a Bible translation is not on the order of picking out a sweater. It's more like picking a doctor - someone you can trust. This book is about how Bible translation is done. And it commends a particular translation - the Holman Christian Standard Bible (HCSB) - as a trustworthy guide to what God has really said.
Categories: Religion

Believer s Baptism

Believer s Baptism

81 See the taxonomy of views in D. B. Wallace, Greek Grammar Beyond the
Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament (Grand Rapids: Zondervan,
1996), 370–71. His list mischaracterizes the view of Campbell and his heirs this
way: ...

Author: Thomas R. Schreiner

Publisher: B&H Publishing Group

ISBN: 9781433669057

Category: Religion

Page: 364

View: 586

Is believer’s baptism the clear teaching of the New Testament Scriptures? What are the historical and theological challenges to believer’s baptism? What are the practical applications for believer’s baptism today? Volume two in the NEW AMERICAN COMMENTARY STUDIES IN BIBLE & THEOLOGY (NACSBT) series for pastors, advanced Bible students, and other deeply committed laypersons addresses these compelling questions. Indeed, Believer’s Baptism begins with the belief that believer’s baptism (as opposed to infant baptism or other faith proclaiming methods) is the clear teaching of the New Testament. Along the way, the argument is supported by written contributions from Andreas Kostenberger, Robert Stein, Thomas Schreiner, Stephen Wellum, Steve McKinion, Jonathan Rainbow, Shawn Wright, and Mark Dever. Users will find this an excellent extension of the long-respected NEW AMERICAN COMMENTARY.
Categories: Religion

Lex Talionis in Early Judaism and the Exhortation of Jesus in Matthew 5 38 42

Lex Talionis in Early Judaism and the Exhortation of Jesus in Matthew 5 38 42

Septuagint The Greek word dvfliotnut occurs seventy-one times in the. 1. Daniel
B. Wallace, Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New
Testament with Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes (Grand Rapids, MI: ...

Author: James Davis

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9780567362117

Category: Religion

Page: 210

View: 749

In Matthew 5:38-42, Jesus overrides the Old Testament teaching of 'an eye for eye and a tooth for a tooth' - the Lex Talionis law - and commands his disciples to turn the other cheek. James Davis asks how Jesus' teaching in this instance relates to the Old Testament talionic commands, how it relates to New Testament era Judaism and what Jesus required from his disciples and the church. Based on the Old Testament texts such as Leviticus 24, Exodus 22 and Deuteronomy 19, a strong case can be made that the Lex Talionis law was understood to have a literal application there are several texts that text of Leviticus 24 provides the strongest case that a literal and judicial application. However, by the second century AD and later, Jewish rabbinic leadership was essentially unified that the OT did not require a literal talion, but that financial penalties could be substituted in court matters. Yet there is evidence from Philo, Rabbi Eliezer and Josephus that in the first century AD the application of literal talion in judicial matters was a major and viable Jewish viewpoint at the time of Jesus. Jesus instruction represents a different perspective from the OT lex talionis texts and also, possibly, from the Judaism of his time. Jesus commands the general principle of not retaliation against the evil person and intended this teaching to be concretely applied, as borne out in his own life. JSNTS
Categories: Religion

1 3 John

1   3 John

Wallace, Daniel B. Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of
the New Testament. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1996. Watson, Duane F. “'Keep
Yourselves from Idols': A Socio-Rhetorical Analysis of the Exordium and
Peroratio ...

Author: John Paul Heil

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781498201612

Category: Religion

Page: 230

View: 518

This book treats the three letters of John as a unified epistolary package. It proposes two new contributions to the study of 1-3 John. First, it presents new comprehensive chiastic structures for each of the three letters of John based on concrete linguistic evidence in the text. These chiastic structures serve as the guide for an audience-oriented exegesis of these letters. Secondly, it treats these letters from the point of view of their worship context and themes. Not only were 1-3 John intended to be performed orally as part of liturgical worship, but together these three letters exhort their audience to a distinctive ethical worship. In accord with the subtitle of this book, the three letters of John are concerned with giving their audience an experience of living eternally by the worship that consists of loving God and one another
Categories: Religion

Emerging Leadership in the Pauline Mission

Emerging Leadership in the Pauline Mission

Wainwright, John J. “Eusebeia: Syncretism or Conservative Contextualization?”
EQ 65 (1993) 211–24. Wallace, Daniel B. Greek Grammar beyond the Basics: An
Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1996.

Author: Jack Barentsen

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781630878139

Category: Religion

Page: 396

View: 402

Where did Paul find leaders for his new churches? How did he instruct and develop them? What processes took place to stabilize the churches and institute their new leadership? This book carves a fresh trail in leadership studies by looking at leadership development from a group-dynamic, social identity perspective. Paul engages the cultural leadership patterns of his key local leaders, publicly affirming, correcting, and improving those patterns to conform to a Christlike pattern of sacrificial service. Paul's own life and ministry offer a motivational and authoritative model for his followers, because he embodies the leadership style he teaches. As a practical theologian avant la lettre, Paul contextualizes key theological themes to strengthen community and leadership formation, and equips his church leaders as entrepreneurs of Christian identity. A careful comparison of the Corinthian and Ephesian churches demonstrates a similar overall pattern of development. This study engages Pauline scholarship on church office in depth and offers alternative readings of five Pauline epistles, generating new insights to enrich dogmatic and practical theological reflection. In a society where many churches reflect on their missional calling, such input from the NT for contemporary Christian leadership formation is direly needed.
Categories: Religion

1 2 and 3 John

1  2  and 3 John

... and the Question of God, vol. 1; Minneapolis: Fortress, 1992), 253, 255–56. 4.
Hays, Moral Vision, 154. 5. E.g., Brown, Epistles of John, 197. 6. Daniel B.
Wallace, Greek Grammar beyond the Basics (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1996),
685. 7.

Author: Karen H. Jobes

Publisher: Zondervan Academic

ISBN: 9780310518013

Category: Religion

Page: 368

View: 406

Designed for the pastor and Bible teacher, the Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament brings together commentary features rarely gathered in one volume. Written by notable evangelical scholars, each volume treats the literary context and structure of the passage in the original Greek, and each author provides an original translation based on the literary structure. The series consistently provides the main point, an exegetical outline, verse-by-verse commentary, and theology in application in each section of every commentary. Critical scholarship informs each step but does not dominate the commentary, allowing readers to concentrate on the biblical author’s message as it unfolds. While primarily designed for those with a basic knowledge of biblical Greek, all who strive to understand and teach the New Testament will find these books beneficial. The Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament series covers the entire New Testament in twenty volumes; Clinton E. Arnold serves as general editor. 1-3 John In her commentary on John’s letters, Karen H. Jobes writes to bridge the distance between academic biblical studies and pastors, students, and laypeople who are looking for an in-depth treatment of the issues raised by these New Testament books. She approaches the three letters of John as part of the corpus that includes John’s gospel, while rejecting an elaborate redactional history of that gospel that implicates the letters. Jobes treats three major themes of the letters under the larger rubric of who has the authority to interpret the true significance of Jesus, an issue that is pressing in our religiously pluralistic society today with its many voices claiming truth about God.
Categories: Religion