Guide To Greek Theatre And Drama

Guide To Greek Theatre And Drama

A new and definitive guide to the theatre of the ancient world The Guide to Greek Theatre and Drama is a meticulously researched and accessible survey into the place and purpose of theatre in Ancient Greece.

Author: Kenneth McLeish

Publisher: Methuen Drama

ISBN: UCSC:32106017094217

Category: Drama

Page: 324

View: 578

Athens in the fifth century B.C. produced a remarkable flowering of playwrights: Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides in tragedy, Aristophanes and, in the fourth century, Menander in comedy. They laid the foundations for all Western drama and continue to speak as powerfully after 2,500 years. Kenneth McLeish's authoritative and enthusiastic Guide to Greek Theatre and Drama is full of his enjoyment and understanding of the plays. It provides an extensive introduction to Athenian theatre, the form of the plays and, as far as can be established, how the plays were performed. Then follows a background section on each playwright, a synopsis and commentary for each of the surviving plays and an outline of Aristotle's theories on drama. The result is an indispensable companion for anyone interested in Greek theatre. The volume was completed by Professor Trevor R. Griffiths.
Categories: Drama

Greek Drama and Dramatists

Greek Drama and Dramatists

opposed to the prehistory, of Greek drama can be said to begin. When the records of the dramatic and dithyrambic contests at the Athenian City Dionysia were eventually published on stone, they seem to have been taken back to 501, ...

Author: Alan H. Sommerstein

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134509843

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 369

The history of European drama began at the festivals of Dionysus in ancient Athens, where tragedy, satyr-drama and comedy were performed. Understanding this background is vital for students of classical, literary and theatrical subjects, and Alan H. Sommerstein's accessible study is the ideal introduction. The book begins by looking at the social and theatrical contexts and different characteristics of the three genres of ancient Greek drama. It then examines the five main dramatists whose works survive - Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes and Menander - discussing their styles, techniques and ideas, and giving short synopses of all their extant plays. Additional helpful features include succinct coverage of almost sixty other authors, a chronology of significant people and events, and an anthology of translated texts, all of which have been previously inaccessible to students. An up-to-date study bibliography of further reading concludes the volume. Clear, concise and comprehensive, and written by an acknowledged expert in the field, Greek Drama and Dramatists will be a valuable orientation text at both sixth form and undergraduate level.
Categories: History

How Greek Tragedy Works

How Greek Tragedy Works

This is an indispensable guide for anyone who finds themselves confronted with tackling the Greek classics, whether as a reader, scholar, student, or director.

Author: Brian Kulick

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0367634066

Category: Greek drama (Tragedy)

Page: 184

View: 577

How Greek Tragedy Works is a journey through the hidden meanings and dual nature of Greek tragedy, drawing on its foremost dramatists to bring about a deeper understanding of how and why to engage with these enduring plays. Brian Kulick dispels the trepidation that many readers feel with regard to classical texts by equipping them with ways in which they can unpack the hidden meanings of these plays. He focuses on three of the key texts of Greek theatre: Aeschylus' Agamemnon, Euripides' The Bacchae, and Sophocles' Electra, and uses them to tease out the core principles of the theatre-making and storytelling impulses. By encouraging us to read between the lines like this, he also enables us to read these and other Greek tragedies as artists' manifestos, equipping us not only to understand tragedy itself, but also to interpret what the great playwrights had to say about the nature of plays and drama. This is an indispensable guide for anyone who finds themselves confronted with tackling the Greek classics, whether as a reader, scholar, student, or director.
Categories: Greek drama (Tragedy)

Greek Tragedy

Greek Tragedy

Why did Sophocles introduce the third actor? Why did Euripides not make better plots? So asks H.D.F Kitto in his acclaimed study of Greek tragedy, available for the first time in Routledge Classics.

Author: H.D.F. Kitto

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781136806902

Category: History

Page: 361

View: 919

'Two things give Kitto's classic book its enduring freshness: he pioneered the approach to Greek drama through internal artistry and thematic form, and he always wrote in lively and readable English.' - Oliver Taplin, University of Oxford, UK Why did Aeschylus characterize differently from Sophocles? Why did Sophocles introduce the third actor? Why did Euripides not make better plots? So asks H.D.F Kitto in his acclaimed study of Greek tragedy, available for the first time in Routledge Classics. Kitto argues that in spite of dealing with big moral and intellectual questions, the Greek dramatist is above all an artist and the key to understanding classical Greek drama is to try and understand the tragic conception of each play. In Kitto’s words ‘We shall ask what the dramatist is striving to say, not what in fact he does say about this or that.’ Through a brilliant analysis of Aeschylus’s ‘Oresteia’, the plays of Sophocles including ‘Antigone’ and ‘Oedipus Tyrannus’; and Euripides’s ‘Medea’ and ‘Hecuba’, Kitto skilfully conveys the enduring artistic and literary brilliance of the Greek dramatists. H.D.F Kitto (1897 – 1982) was a renowned British classical scholar. He lectured at the University of Glasgow from 1920-1944 before becoming Professor of Greek at Bristol University, where he taught until 1962.
Categories: History

A Guide to Ancient Greek Drama

A Guide to Ancient Greek Drama

299–315. Sommerstein, Alan H. 1996. “How to avoid being a komodumenos.”s Classical Quarterly 46: y 327–56. *Sommerstein, Alan H. 2002. Greek Drama and Dramatists. London: Routledge. s Sommerstein, Alan H. 2008. Aeschylus, 3 vols.

Author: Ian C. Storey

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118455128

Category: Drama

Page: 352

View: 388

This newly updated second edition features wide-ranging, systematically organized scholarship in a concise introduction to ancient Greek drama, which flourished from the sixth to third century BC. Covers all three genres of ancient Greek drama – tragedy, comedy, and satyr-drama Surveys the extant work of Aeschylus, Sophokles, Euripides, Aristophanes, and Menander, and includes entries on ‘lost’ playwrights Examines contextual issues such as the origins of dramatic art forms; the conventions of the festivals and the theater; drama’s relationship with the worship of Dionysos; political dimensions of drama; and how to read and watch Greek drama Includes single-page synopses of every surviving ancient Greek play
Categories: Drama

A Handbook to the Reception of Greek Drama

A Handbook to the Reception of Greek Drama

Ancient scholarship also produced biographical works on Greek poets, including dramatists from Aeschylus to Menander, which is testament to the continuing popularity of the dramatic poets and their work.

Author: Betine van Zyl Smit

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118347751

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 619

View: 124

A Handbook to the Reception of Greek Drama offers a series of original essays that represent a comprehensive overview of the global reception of ancient Greek tragedies and comedies from antiquity to the present day. Represents the first volume to offer a complete overview of the reception of ancient drama from antiquity to the present Covers the translation, transmission, performance, production, and adaptation of Greek tragedy from the time the plays were first created in ancient Athens through the 21st century Features overviews of the history of the reception of Greek drama in most countries of the world Includes chapters covering the reception of Greek drama in modern opera and film
Categories: Literary Criticism

A Handbook to the Reception of Greek Drama

A Handbook to the Reception of Greek Drama

Represents the first volume to offer a complete overview of the reception of ancient drama from antiquity to the present Covers the translation, transmission, performance, production, and adaptation of Greek tragedy from the time the plays ...

Author: Betine van Zyl Smit

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118347768

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 624

View: 543

A Handbook to the Reception of Greek Drama offers a series of original essays that represent a comprehensive overview of the global reception of ancient Greek tragedies and comedies from antiquity to the present day. Represents the first volume to offer a complete overview of the reception of ancient drama from antiquity to the present Covers the translation, transmission, performance, production, and adaptation of Greek tragedy from the time the plays were first created in ancient Athens through the 21st century Features overviews of the history of the reception of Greek drama in most countries of the world Includes chapters covering the reception of Greek drama in modern opera and film
Categories: Literary Criticism

Greek Theatre in the Fourth Century BC

Greek Theatre in the Fourth Century BC

Public performance was a driving force in selecting dramas and dramatists, with actors and audiences playing a key role in preserving dramas or condemning them to loss. The survival of play-texts on papyri is, in itself, a by-product of ...

Author: Eric Csapo

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110337556

Category: History

Page: 590

View: 401

Age-old scholarly dogma holds that the death of serious theatre went hand-in-hand with the 'death' of the city-state and that the fourth century BC ushered in an era of theatrical mediocrity offering shallow entertainment to a depoliticised citizenry. The traditional view of fourth-century culture is encouraged and sustained by the absence of dramatic texts in anything more than fragments. Until recently, little attention was paid to an enormous array of non-literary evidence attesting, not only the sustained vibrancy of theatrical culture, but a huge expansion of theatre throughout (and even beyond) the Greek world. Epigraphic, historiographic, iconographic and archaeological evidence indicates that the fourth century BC was an age of exponential growth in theatre. It saw: the construction of permanent stone theatres across and beyond the Mediterranean world; the addition of theatrical events to existing festivals; the creation of entirely new contexts for drama; and vast investment, both public and private, in all areas of what was rapidly becoming a major 'industry'. This is the first book to explore all the evidence for fourth century ancient theatre: its architecture, drama, dissemination, staging, reception, politics, social impact, finance and memorialisation.
Categories: History

Greek Drama and the Invention of Rhetoric

Greek Drama and the Invention of Rhetoric

dramas, just as reading was, and is, secondary to the audience's process of experiencing a play. Appropriately, we still refer to dramatists in English as “playwrights,” speaking of them in terms of their crafting of theatrical ...

Author: David Sansone

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118358375

Category: Drama

Page: 279

View: 536

Asserts a novel and controversial theory on the origins of rhetoric that differs radically from the standard view Argues that it was the theatre of Ancient Greece, first appearing around 500 BC, that prompted the development of formalized rhetoric, which evolved soon thereafter Provides a cogent reworking of existing evidence Reveals the bias and inconsistency of Aristotle
Categories: Drama

Greek Tragedy

Greek Tragedy

Why did Sophocles introduce the third actor? Why did Euripides not make better plots? So asks H.D.F Kitto in his acclaimed study of Greek tragedy, first published in 1936 and available for the first time in Routledge Classics.

Author: Humphrey Davy Findley Kitto

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0415610192

Category: History

Page: 341

View: 146

‘Criticism, it seems to me, can without discredit begin with what’s in the poet’s head, without inquiring how it got there.’ Why did Aeschylus characterize differently from Sophocles? Why did Sophocles introduce the third actor? Why did Euripides not make better plots? So asks H.D.F Kitto in his acclaimed study of Greek tragedy, first published in 1936 and available for the first time in Routledge Classics. Kitto argues that in spite of dealing with big moral and intellectual questions, the Greek dramatist is above all an artist and the key to understanding classical Greek drama is to try and understand the tragic conception of each play. In Kitto’s words ‘ We shall ask what the dramatist is striving to say, not what in fact he does say about this or that.’ Through a fascinating analysis of Aeschylus’s Oresteia, the plays of Sophocles including Antigoneand Oedipus Tyrannus; and Euripides’s Medeaand Hecuba, Kitto skilfully conveys the artistic and literary brilliance of the Greek dramatists and explains why classical Greek tragedy has the power to grip the reader today as when the plays were first written and performed. This Routledge Classicsedition includes a new foreword by Edith Hall.
Categories: History