Greek Comedy and the Discourse of Genres

Greek Comedy and the Discourse of Genres

This book explores ancient comedy's interactions with Homeric and Hesiodic epic, iambos, lyric, tragedy, the fable tradition, the ritual performances of the Greek polis, and its reception in Platonic writings and Alexandrian scholarship, ...

Author: Emmanuela Bakola

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107355507

Category: History

Page:

View: 438

Recent scholarship has acknowledged that the intertextual discourse of ancient comedy with previous and contemporary literary traditions is not limited to tragedy. This book is a timely response to the more sophisticated and theory-grounded way of viewing comedy's interactions with its cultural and intellectual context. It shows that in the process of its self-definition, comedy emerges as voracious and multifarious with a wide spectrum of literary, sub-literary and paraliterary traditions, the engagement with which emerges as central to its projected literary identity and, subsequently, to the reception of the genre itself. Comedy's self-definition through generic discourse far transcends the (narrowly conceived) 'high-low' division of genres. This book explores ancient comedy's interactions with Homeric and Hesiodic epic, iambos, lyric, tragedy, the fable tradition, the ritual performances of the Greek polis, and its reception in Platonic writings and Alexandrian scholarship, within a unified interpretative framework.
Categories: History

The Oxford Handbook of Greek and Roman Comedy

The Oxford Handbook of Greek and Roman Comedy

he himself is even more obsessed with other genres, employing characters,
meters, and stories from epic, iambic, and satyr play, ... In Greek Comedy and the
Discourse of Genres, edited by E. Bakola, L. Prauscello and M. Telò, 40–80.
Oxford: ...

Author: Michael Fontaine

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199389469

Category: History

Page: 912

View: 399

In recent decades literary approaches to drama have multiplied: new historical, intertextual, political, performative and metatheatrical, socio-linguistic, gender-driven, transgenre-driven. New information has been amassed, sometimes by re-examination of extant literary texts and material artifacts, at other times from new discoveries from the fields of archaeology, epigraphy, art history, and literary studies. The Oxford Handbook of Greek and Roman Comedy marks the first comprehensive introduction to and reference work for the unified study of ancient comedy. From the birth of comedy in Greece to its end in Rome, from the Hellenistic diffusion of performances after the death of Menander to its artistic, scholarly, and literary receptions in the later Roman Empire, no topic is neglected. 41 essays spread across Greek Comedy, Roman Comedy, and the transmission and reception of Ancient comedy by an international team of experts offer cutting-edge guides through the immense terrain of the field, while an expert introduction surveys the major trends and shifts in scholarly study of comedy from the 1960s to today. The Handbook includes two detailed appendices that provide invaluable research tools for both scholars and students. The result offers Hellenists an excellent overview of the earliest reception and creative reuse of Greek New Comedy, Latinists a broad perspective of the evolution of Roman Comedy, and scholars and students of classics an excellent resource and tipping point for future interdisciplinary research.
Categories: History

The Emergence of the Lyric Canon

The Emergence of the Lyric Canon

Porter, J. I. (2010), The Origins of Aesthetic Thought in Ancient Greece: Matter,
Sensation, and Experience. ... and Comic Discourse in Plato's Laws', in Bakola, E
., Prauscello, L. and Teló, M. (eds), Greek Comedy and the Discourse of Genres.

Author: Theodora A. Hadjimichael

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780198810865

Category:

Page: 368

View: 117

The Hellenistic period was an era of literary canons, of privileged texts and collections. One of the most stable of these consisted of the nine (rarely ten) lyric poets: whether the selection was based on poetic quality, popularity, or the availability of texts in the Library of Alexandria,the Lyric Canon offers a valuable and revealing window on the reception and survival of lyric in antiquity. This volume explores the complexities inherent in the process by which lyric poetry was canonized, and discusses questions connected with the textual transmission and preservation of lyric poems from the archaic period through to the Hellenistic era. It firstly contextualizes lyric poetrygeographically, and then focuses on a broad range of sources that played a critical role in the survival of lyric poetry - in particular, comedy, Plato, Aristotle's Peripatetic school, and the Hellenistic scholars - to discuss the reception of the nine canonical lyric poets and their work. Byexploring the ways in which fifth- and fourth-century sources interpreted lyric material, and the role they played both in the scholarly work of the Alexandrians and in the creation of what we conventionally call the Hellenistic Lyric Canon, it elucidates what can be defined as the prevailingpattern in the transmission of lyric poetry, as well as the place of Bacchylides as a puzzling exception to this norm. The overall discussion conclusively demonstrates that the canonizing process of the lyric poets was already at work from the fifth century BC and that it is reflected both in theevaluation of lyric by fourth-century thinkers and in the activities of the Hellenistic scholars in the Library of Alexandria.
Categories:

Aristophanes and the Cloak of Comedy

Aristophanes and the Cloak of Comedy

Aristophanes and the Generation of Greek Comedy challenges the ways in which both ancient and modern scholarship have created the figure we know as Aristophanes and it builds on Telo's the long-term project to study the genres of ancient ...

Author: Mario Telò

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226309699

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 237

View: 654

Aristophanes and the Generation of Greek Comedy challenges the ways in which both ancient and modern scholarship have created the figure we know as Aristophanes and it builds on Telo's the long-term project to study the genres of ancient Greek literature (particularly plays) as well as genre theory more generally.Telo asks, how did the image we know of Aristophanes arose? Aristophanes' supremacy is traced, by Telo, back to the playwright himself. Early scholars presented Aristophanes' work as a prestigious object, an expression of supposedly transhistorical values of dignity (semnotes) and self-control (sophrosune). This construction of the merits of Aristophanic comedy over that of other varieties depends on its textual connections with other works, particularly tragedies. Telo shows, through close readings of Wasps and Clouds, for example, how the Aristophanic style is actually figured in the plays as the tactile experience of a garment, a soft, protective cloak intended to shield an audience from the debilitating effects of competitors' comedies during the Dionysia. Aristophanes' narratives of sons and fathers, poet and audience, is thus at the center of the discourse that has shaped his canonical dominance ever since.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Cambridge Companion to Greek Comedy

The Cambridge Companion to Greek Comedy

... as some scholars hold, date to this later period.6 In his book, Genres in
Discourse, Todorov took aim principally at the archetypal ... 4 Csapo (2000) 115
remarks: 'The genre transformation best represented by the remains of ancient
Greek literature is that of ... What we call classical Greek tragedy may itself be
seen as a collection of various kinds of drama, including romantic quasi-
comedies such as ...

Author: Martin Revermann

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521760287

Category: Drama

Page: 520

View: 736

Provides a unique panorama of this challenging area of Greek literature, combining literary perspectives with historical issues and material culture.
Categories: Drama

Genres in Dialogue

Genres in Dialogue

This 1995 book takes as its starting point Plato's incorporation of specific genres of poetry and rhetoric into his dialogues.

Author: Andrea Wilson Nightingale

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521774330

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 222

View: 103

This 1995 book takes as its starting point Plato's incorporation of specific genres of poetry and rhetoric into his dialogues. The author argues that Plato's 'dialogues' with traditional genres are part and parcel of his effort to define 'philosophy'. Before Plato, 'philosophy' designated 'intellectual cultivation' in the broadest sense. When Plato appropriated the term for his own intellectual project, he created a new and specialised discipline. In order to define and legitimise 'philosophy', Plato had to match it against genres of discourse that had authority and currency in democratic Athens. By incorporating the text or discourse of another genre, Plato 'defines' his new brand of wisdom in opposition to traditional modes of thinking and speaking. By targeting individual genres of discourse Plato marks the boundaries of 'philosophy' as a discursive and as a social practice.
Categories: Literary Collections

Juvenal and the Satiric Genre

Juvenal and the Satiric Genre

Genres. Horace, Persius, and Juvenal, as we have seen, make an issue of
criticism by name in their programmatic satires. ... the nameprofiles found in both
Greek and Roman epic, in Greek and Roman tragedy, in old and new comedy,
Greek and Roman bucolic, ... need to be brought into the discourse in more
explicit or more consciously artful ways.5 Many more named characters of some
importance in ...

Author: Frederick Jones

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9781849667791

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 255

While claiming to stand outside literature altogether, Roman verse satire was the most aggressively literary of Roman genres, Juvenal's particularly so. In the opening lines of the corpus, his performance creates an arena in which the various genres of his Graeco-Roman cultural inheritance jostle to be heard, and are suppressed by his own generic identity. Juvenal and the Satiric Genre considers the fluid nature of the generic field, and how Juvenal comes out of and fits into it. Specifically, it measures his use of names, his ambiguous and sometimes hostile relations with other genres, especially the queen of genres, epic, against his inherited and stated aim (of criticizing malefactors by name), and considers how the aspect of performance impinges on his multi-faceted satiric voice. This challenging series considers Greek and Roman literature primarily in relation to genre and theme. It also aims to place writer and original addressee in their social context. The series will appeal to both scholar and student, and to anyone interested in our classical inheritance.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Revels in Madness

Revels in Madness

In our context the salient fact to consider is that, in the fifth century, Athens gave
birth to a literary genre that, analogous to ... As a theatrical genre Greek comedy
allows madness and deviance to occupy a societal space—the stage—to which
the ... The more capacious Discourses on Madness in the Greco-Roman World •
33.

Author: Allen Thiher

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472089994

Category: History

Page: 354

View: 227

"The scope of this book is daunting, ranging from madness in the ancient Greco-Roman world, to Christianized concepts of medieval folly, through the writings of early modern authors such as Shakespeare, Cervantes, and Descartes, and on to German Romantic philosophy, fin de siecle French poetry, and Freud . . . Artaud, Duras, and Plath."-Isis"This provocative and closely argued work will reward many readers."-ChoiceIn Revels in Madness, Allen Thiher surveys a remarkable range of writers as he shows how conceptions of madness in literature have reflected the cultural assumptions of their era, and emphasizes the transition from classical to modern theories of madness-a transition that began at the end of the Enlightenment and culminates in recent women's writing that challenges the postmodern understanding of madness as a fall from language or as a dysfunction of culture.
Categories: History

A History of Ancient Greek

A History of Ancient Greek

By contrast, in the case of comedy, the genre favored the presence of foreigners
who declare their identity through their discourse too, thus contributing to the
comic effect. According to one testimony, the comic poet Plato put a "barbarizing"
 ...

Author: Maria Arapopoulou

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521833073

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 1617

View: 325

Comprehensive, authoritative but highly accessible reference work essential for all those interested in the history of Greek.
Categories: Foreign Language Study

Feminine Discourse in Roman Comedy

Feminine Discourse in Roman Comedy

I then compare these perceptions revealed by my reading of comedy with ideas
about gender and pain articulated in other discourses, including medical
treatises and ... First, however, I will address the inevitable question that comedic
suffering raises, namely, the genre's relationship to pain. ... Greek references to
laughable pain are collected by Minois (2000: 15–22); see also Garland (1994:
74-82).

Author: Dorota M. Dutsch

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191559860

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 294

View: 441

As literature written in Latin has almost no female authors, we are dependent on male writers for some understanding of the way women would have spoken. Plautus (3rd to 2nd century BCE) and Terence (2nd century BCE) consistently write particular linguistic features into the lines spoken by their female characters: endearments, soft speech, and incoherent focus on numerous small problems. Dorota M. Dutsch describes the construction of this feminine idiom and asks whether it should be considered as evidence of how Roman women actually spoke.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

The Rivals of Aristophanes

The Rivals of Aristophanes

Due to the scarcity of surviving texts by other poets, it is easy to forget that Aristophanes wrote for competition and that rivalry was an important component in the rhetoric of his comedies, especially Clouds and Knights .

Author: F. David Harvey

Publisher: Classical Pressof Wales

ISBN: UOM:39015050505901

Category: Poetry

Page: 556

View: 831

Due to the scarcity of surviving texts by other poets, it is easy to forget that Aristophanes wrote for competition and that rivalry was an important component in the rhetoric of his comedies, especially Clouds and Knights .
Categories: Poetry

The Narrative Jesus

The Narrative Jesus

THE ROLES OF THE WONDER NARRATIVE A. GENRE AND ROLE -
CONFIGURATION The term narrative genre refers to a relatively independent ...
which is confusing and may give rise to methodically unclear comparisons , for
example between classical Greek comedy and Pauline theology , cf. ... In
Christian discourses , the two main genres may be referred to as eu - angelium
and dys - angelium .

Author: Ole Davidsen

Publisher: Aarhus Universitetsforlag

ISBN: IND:30000051224214

Category: Religion

Page: 404

View: 909

Categories: Religion

Parody Politics and the Populace in Greek Old Comedy

Parody  Politics and the Populace in Greek Old Comedy

This book argues that Old Comedy's parodic and non-parodic engagement with tragedy, satyr play, and contemporary lyric is geared to enhancing its own status as the preeminent discourse on Athenian art, politics and society.

Author: Donald Sells

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350060531

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 304

View: 364

This book argues that Old Comedy's parodic and non-parodic engagement with tragedy, satyr play, and contemporary lyric is geared to enhancing its own status as the preeminent discourse on Athenian art, politics and society. Donald Sells locates the enduring significance of parody in the specific cultural, social and political subtexts that often frame Old Comedy's bold experiments with other genres and drive its rapid evolution in the late fifth century. Close analysis of verbal, visual and narrative strategies reveals the importance of parody and literary appropriation to the particular cultural and political agendas of specific plays. This study's broader, more flexible definition of parody as a visual – not just verbal – and multi-coded performance represents an important new step in understanding a phenomenon whose richness and diversity exceeds the primarily textual and literary terms by which it is traditionally understood.
Categories: Literary Collections

Choral Mediations in Greek Tragedy

Choral Mediations in Greek Tragedy

This volume explores how the choruses of Greek tragedy creatively combined media and discourses to generate their own specific forms of meaning.

Author: Renaud Gagné

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107067745

Category: History

Page:

View: 649

This volume explores how the choruses of Greek tragedy creatively combined media and discourses to generate their own specific forms of meaning. The contributors analyse choruses as fictional, religious and civic performers; as combinations of text, song and dance; and as objects of reflection in themselves, in relation and contrast to the choruses of comedy and melic poetry. Drawing on earlier analyses of the social context of Greek drama, the non-textual dimensions of tragedy, and the relations between dramatic and melic choruses, the chapters explore the uses of various analytic tools in allowing us better to capture the specificity of the tragic chorus. Special attention is given to the physicality of choral dancing, musical interactions between choruses and actors, the trajectories of reception, and the treatment of time and space in the odes.
Categories: History

Form Genre and the Study of Political Discourse

Form  Genre  and the Study of Political Discourse

Aristotle ' s followers , the genres have given and unchangeable attributes based
on their relationship with human nature , and ... A theme for Comedy refuses to
be set forth in verses of Tragedy . ... attitude toward derivative lyric poets of his
own age in the other Epistles ( " If novelty had been as offensive to the Greeks as
it is ...

Author: Mike P McKeever

Publisher:

ISBN: UCSC:32106007545046

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 377

View: 594

Categories: Literary Criticism

The Cambridge World History of Slavery Volume 1 The Ancient Mediterranean World

The Cambridge World History of Slavery  Volume 1  The Ancient Mediterranean World

The 'clever slave' in New Comedy took over important and subversive aspects of
the comic hero of Old Comedy. Only in the genre of history with its
increasinglynarrowfocusonpoliticsandwarwereslaveslargely absent.But even
Greek historiography – and political discourse in general – though mainly devoid
of actual slaves, cannot be understood without reference to the central concepts
of political ...

Author: Keith Bradley

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521840668

Category: History

Page: 632

View: 542

"Most societies in the past have had slaves, and almost all peoples have at some time in their pasts been both slaves as well as owners of slaves. Recent decades have seen a significant increase in our understanding of the historical role played by slavery and wide interest across a range of academic disciplines in the evolution of the institution. Exciting and innovative research methodologies have been developed, and numerous fruitful debates generated. Further, the study of slavery has come to providestrong connections between academic research and the wider public interest at a time when such links have in general been weak. The CambridgeWorld History of Slavery responds to these trends by providing for the first time, in four volumes, a comprehensive global history of this widespread phenomenon from the ancient world to the present day. Volume I surveys the history of slavery in the ancient Mediterranean world. Although chapters are devoted to the ancient Near East and the Jews, its principal concern is with the societies of ancient Greece and Rome. These are often considered as the first examples in world history of genuine slave societies because of the widespread prevalence of chattel slavery, which is argued to have been a cultural manifestation of the ubiquitous violence in societies typified by incessant warfare"--Provided by publisher.
Categories: History

Developments in Linguistic Humour Theory

Developments in Linguistic Humour Theory

While the former sees satire as an institutionalized genre of discourse, the latter
perceives it not as a genre of ... of warrior aristocracy, tragedy emerged from
religion, and comedy emerged from the moral preoccupation of the Greek city-
states.

Author: Marta Dynel

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN: 9789027271105

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 425

View: 675

This volume presents recent developments in the linguistics of humour. It depicts new theoretical proposals for capturing different humorous forms and phenomena central to humour research, thereby extending its scope. The 15 contributions critically survey and develop the existing interpretative models, or they postulate novel theoretical approaches to humour in order to better elucidate its workings. The collection of articles offers cutting-edge interdisciplinary explorations, encompassing various realms of linguistics (semantics, pragmatics, stylistics, cognitive linguistics, and language philosophy), as well as drawing on findings from other fields, primarily: sociology, psychology and anthropology. Thanks to careful overviews of the relevant background literature, the papers will be of use to not only researchers and academics but also students. Albeit focused on theoretical developments, rather than case studies, the volume is illustrated with interesting research data, such as the discourse of television programmes and series, films and stand-up comedy, as well as jokes.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

The City as Comedy

The City as Comedy

The first two essays in this collection refine the vocabulary of utopian discourse
by making important distinctions (e.g., Arcadian vs. ... 2 Indeed, for the purposes
of appreciating the Other dimensions of fantastic literature, Greek comedy in
particular, we are better served by ... place," is articulated to the spectators in the
prologue by being projected into fantastic transformations of language, form, and
genre.

Author: Gregory W. Dobrov

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807846457

Category: Drama

Page: 355

View: 376

Thirteen essays combine classical scholars' interest in theatrical production with a growing interdisciplinary inquiry into the urban contexts of literary production. At once a study of classical Greek literature and an analysis of cultural production, this collection reveals how for two centuries Athens itself was transformed, staged as comedy, and ultimately shaped by contemporary material, social, and ideological forces.
Categories: Drama

Prisoner of History

Prisoner of History

Attic comedy, a genre full of commentary about politics, provides the only known
contemporary evidence for Aspasia's life. Old Comedy, as this earliest attested
phase of Greek comedy is known, is paramount to Aspasia's biographical
tradition: though frequently ... Comedy is also the premier nexus of discourses on
sexuality, power, and intellect in the fifth century, discourses to which Aspasia is
crucial.

Author: Madeleine M. Henry

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195358651

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 333

According to legend, Aspasia of Miletus was a courtesan, the teacher of Socrates, and the political adviser of her lover Pericles. Next to Sappho and Cleopatra, she is the best known woman of the ancient Mediterranean. Yet continued uncritical reception of her depiction in Attic comedy and naive acceptance of Plutarch's account of her in his Life of Pericles prevent us from understanding who she was and what her contributions to Greek thought may have been. Madeleine Henry combines traditional philological and historical methods of analysis with feminist critical perspectives, in order to trace the construction of Aspasia's biographical tradition from ancient times to the present. Through her analysis of both literary and political evidence, Henry determines the ways in which Aspasia has become an icon of the sexually attractive and politically influential female, how this construction has prevented her from taking her rightful place as a contributor to the philosophical enterprise, and how continued belief in this icon has helped sexualize all women's intellectual achievements. This is the first work to study Aspasia's biographical tradition from ancient Greece to the present day.
Categories: History

Matrices of Genre

Matrices of Genre

sumptions about the generic underpinnings of Greek epic poetry , Rutherford
finds an interplay between Homeric text ... in creating a form of generic discourse
that could incorporate a wider range of mythological topics than Homer ' s epics
but ... In this sort of history , a single author can actually be the sole instance of a
genre : Old Comedy is instantiated in Aristophanes ; New Comedy , in Menander
.

Author: Mary Depew

Publisher:

ISBN: UCSC:32106015626341

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 346

View: 446

The literary genres given shape by the writers of classical antiquity are central to our own thinking about the various forms literature takes. Examining those genres, the essays collected here focus on the concept and role of the author and the emergence of authorship out of performance in Greece and Rome. In a fruitful variety of ways the contributors to this volume address the questions: what generic rules were recognized and observed by the Greeks and Romans over the centuries; what competing schemes were there for classifying genres and accounting for literary change; and what role did authors play in maintaining and developing generic contexts? Their essays look at tragedy, epigram, hymns, rhapsodic poetry, history, comedy, bucolic poetry, prophecy, Augustan poetry, commentaries, didactic poetry, and works that "mix genres." The contributors bring to this analysis a wide range of expertise; they are, in addition to the editors, Glenn W. Most, Joseph Day, Ian Rutherford, Deborah Boedeker, Eric Csapo, Marco Fantuzzi, Stephanie West, Alessandro Barchiesi, Ineke Sluiter, Don Fowler, and Stephen Hinds. The essays are drawn from a colloquium at Harvard's Center for Hellenic Studies.
Categories: Literary Collections