Great Power Diplomacy in the Hellenistic World

Great Power Diplomacy in the Hellenistic World

Diplomacy is a neglected aspect of Hellenistic history, despite the fact that war and peace were the major preoccupations of the rulers of the kingdoms of the time.

Author: John D Grainger

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317124863

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 351

Diplomacy is a neglected aspect of Hellenistic history, despite the fact that war and peace were the major preoccupations of the rulers of the kingdoms of the time. It becomes clear that it is possible to discern a set of accepted practices which were generally followed by the kings from the time of Alexander to the approach of Rome. The republican states were less bound by such practices, and this applies above all to Rome and Carthage. By concentrating on diplomatic institutions and processes, therefore, it is possible to gain a new insight into the relations between the kingdoms. This study investigates the making and duration of peace treaties, the purpose of so-called 'marriage alliances', the absence of summit meetings, and looks in detail at the relations between states from a diplomatic point of view, rather than only in terms of the wars they fought. The system which had emerged as a result of the personal relationships between Alexander's successors, continued in operation for at least two centuries. The intervention of Rome brought in a new great power which had no similar tradition, and the Hellenistic system crumbled therefore under Roman pressure.
Categories: History

Great Power Diplomacy in the Hellenistic World

Great Power Diplomacy in the Hellenistic World

This study of diplomacy in the Hellenistic period, a subject long neglected, describes the major institutions, particularly in the practices of concluding peace at the end of the many wars of that time.

Author: Dr. John D. Grainger

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 036788190X

Category:

Page: 264

View: 577

Diplomacy is a neglected aspect of Hellenistic history, despite the fact that war and peace were the major preoccupations of the rulers of the kingdoms of the time. It becomes clear that it is possible to discern a set of accepted practices which were generally followed by the kings from the time of Alexander to the approach of Rome. The republican states were less bound by such practices, and this applies above all to Rome and Carthage. By concentrating on diplomatic institutions and processes, therefore, it is possible to gain a new insight into the relations between the kingdoms. This study investigates the making and duration of peace treaties, the purpose of so-called 'marriage alliances', the absence of summit meetings, and looks in detail at the relations between states from a diplomatic point of view, rather than only in terms of the wars they fought. The system which had emerged as a result of the personal relationships between Alexander's successors, continued in operation for at least two centuries. The intervention of Rome brought in a new great power which had no similar tradition, and the Hellenistic system crumbled therefore under Roman pressure.
Categories:

Great Power Diplomacy in the Hellenistic World

Great Power Diplomacy in the Hellenistic World

That is, the new diplomacy was worked out at the beginning of the Hellenistic period, in the years following the death of Alexander the Great, among the three great kingdoms and their predecessor, the realm of Antigonos Monophthalomos, ...

Author: John D Grainger

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781317124870

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 945

Diplomacy is a neglected aspect of Hellenistic history, despite the fact that war and peace were the major preoccupations of the rulers of the kingdoms of the time. It becomes clear that it is possible to discern a set of accepted practices which were generally followed by the kings from the time of Alexander to the approach of Rome. The republican states were less bound by such practices, and this applies above all to Rome and Carthage. By concentrating on diplomatic institutions and processes, therefore, it is possible to gain a new insight into the relations between the kingdoms. This study investigates the making and duration of peace treaties, the purpose of so-called 'marriage alliances', the absence of summit meetings, and looks in detail at the relations between states from a diplomatic point of view, rather than only in terms of the wars they fought. The system which had emerged as a result of the personal relationships between Alexander's successors, continued in operation for at least two centuries. The intervention of Rome brought in a new great power which had no similar tradition, and the Hellenistic system crumbled therefore under Roman pressure.
Categories: History

Syrian Influences in the Roman Empire to AD 300

Syrian Influences in the Roman Empire to AD 300

This book is a consideration, based on original sources, of the means by which Syrians, whose country was only annexed to the empire in 64 BC, saw their influence penetrate into all levels of society from private soldiers and ordinary ...

Author: John D. Grainger

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351628686

Category: History

Page: 274

View: 893

The study of Syria as a Roman province has been neglected by comparison with equivalent geographical regions such as Italy, Egypt, Greece and even Gaul. It was, however, one of the economic powerhouses of the empire from its annexation until after the empire’s dissolution. As such it clearly deserves some particular consideration, but at the same time it was a major contributor to the military strength of the empire, notably in the form of the recruitment of auxiliary regiments, several dozens of which were formed from Syrians. Many pagan gods, such as Jupiter Dolichenus and Jupiter Heliopolitanus Dea Syra, and also Judaism, originated in Syria and reached the far bounds of the empire. This book is a consideration, based on original sources, of the means by which Syrians, whose country was only annexed to the empire in 64 BC, saw their influence penetrate into all levels of society from private soldiers and ordinary citizens to priests and to imperial families.
Categories: History

Kings and Kingship in the Hellenistic World 350 30 BC

Kings and Kingship in the Hellenistic World  350   30 BC

Politics, Administration, and Society in the Hellenistic and Roman Worlds, Studia Hellenistica, 36, 2000, 107–22. Gardin, J.-C., and P. Gentelle, ... Grainger, J.D., Great Power Diplomacy in the Hellenistic World, London, 2016.

Author: John D. Grainger

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781473863774

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 186

Between c.350 BC and 30 BC the Mediterranean world was one in which kings ruled. The exceptions were the Greek cities and Roman Italy. But for most of that period neither of these republican areas was central to events. For the crucial centuries between Alexander the Great and the Roman conquest of Macedon, the political running was made by kings, and it is their work and loves and experience which is the subject here. Rome's expansion extinguished a series of monarchies and pushed back the area which was ruled by kings for a time, but the process of building a republican empire eventually rebounded on the city, and the Romans empire came to be ruled by an emperor who was in fact a facsimile of a Hellenistic king.Rather than attempting a narrative of the various kingdoms, John Grainger takes a thematic approach, considering various aspects of Hellenistic kingship in turn. This allows him to highlight the common features as well as the differences across the various dynasties. How did one become king? How was a smooth succession secured and what happened when it was not? What were the duties of a king, and what were the rewards and distractions? These are just a few of the interesting facets examined in this original and fascinating book.
Categories: History

Rome s Great Eastern War

Rome s Great Eastern War

(2002), The Roman War of Antiochus the Great (Leiden). ... (2013b), Rome, Parthia, and India: The Violent Emergence of a New World Order 150–140 BC (Barnsley). ... (2016), Great Power Diplomacy in the Hellenistic World (London).

Author: Gareth C Sampson

Publisher: Pen and Sword Military

ISBN: 9781526762696

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 538

Despite Rome’s conquest of the Mediterranean, by the turn of the first century BC, Rome’s influence barely stretched into the East. In the century since Rome’s defeat of the Seleucid Empire in the 180s BC, the East was dominated by the rise of new empires: Parthia, Armenia and Pontus, each vying to recreate the glories of the Persian Empire. By the 80s BC, the Pontic Empire of Mithridates had grown so bold that it invaded and annexed the whole of Rome’s eastern empire and occupied Greece itself. As Rome emerged from the devastating effects of the First Civil War, a new breed of general emerged, eager to re-assert Roman military dominance and carve out a fresh empire in the east, treading in the footsteps of Alexander. This work analyses the military campaigns and battles between a revitalized Rome and the various powers of the eastern Mediterranean hinterland, which ultimately heralded a new phase in Roman imperial expansion and reshaped the ancient East.
Categories: History

Hellenistic Inter state Political Ethics and the Emergence of the Jewish State

Hellenistic Inter state Political Ethics and the Emergence of the Jewish State

The Image of the Jews in Greek Literature: The Hellenistic Period. ... International Systems in World History: Remaking the Study of International Relations. ... Great Power Diplomacy in the Hellenistic World. Abingdon: Routledge.

Author: Doron Mendels

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9780567701404

Category: Religion

Page: 192

View: 854

Against the background of a reconstructed inter-state ethical code, the rise of the Hasmoneans,Judea's ruling dynasty, is given a new perspective. Doron Mendels explores how concepts such as liberty, justice, fairness, loyalty, reciprocity, adherence to ancestral laws, compassion, accountability and love of fatherland became meaningful in the relations between nations in the Hellenistic Mediterranean sphere, as well as between ruling empires and their subject states. The emerging Jewish state echoed this ethical system.
Categories: Religion

Reign of Arrows

Reign of Arrows

Grainger, J. Kings and Kingship in the Hellenistic World 350–30 BC. Barnsley, 2017a. Grainger, J. Great Power Diplomacy in the Hellenistic World. London, 2017b. Grajetzki, W. Greeks and Parthians in Mesopotamia and Beyond 331 BC–224 AD.

Author: Nikolaus Leo Overtoom

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190888343

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 235

From its origins as a minor nomadic tribe to its status as a major world empire, the rise of the Parthian state in the ancient world is nothing short of remarkable. In their early history, the Parthians benefitted from strong leadership, a flexible and accommodating cultural identity, and innovative military characteristics that allowed them to compete against and even overcome Greek, Persian, Central Asian, and eventually Roman rivals. Reign of Arrows provides the first comprehensive study, in almost a century, dedicated entirely to early Parthian history. Assimilating a wide array of especially recent scholarship across numerous fields of study, Nikolaus Overtoom presents the most cogent, well rounded, and up-to-date account of the Parthian empire in its wider context of Hellenistic history. It explains the political and military encounters that shaped the international environment of the Hellenistic Middle East from the middle third to the early first centuries BCE. This study combines traditional historical approaches, such as source criticism and the integration of material evidence, with the incorporation of modern international relations theory to better examine the emergence and expansion of Parthian power. Relevant to historians, classicists, political scientists, and general readers interested in the ancient world and military history, Reign of Arrows reimagines and reconstructs the rise of the Parthians within the hotly contested and dangerously competitive international environment of the Hellenistic world.
Categories: History

Age of Conquests

Age of Conquests

The Greek World from Alexander to Hadrian (336 BC – AD 138) Angelos Chaniotis ... 223–187 BC, Barnsley, 2015 ——, Great Power Diplomacy in the Hellenistic World, London, 2017 Grajetzki, W., Greeks and Parthians in Mesopotamia and Beyond, ...

Author: Angelos Chaniotis

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN: 9781847654212

Category: History

Page:

View: 960

The ancient world that Alexander the Great transformed in his lifetime was transformed once more by his death. The imperial dynasties of his successors incorporated and reorganized the fallen Persian empire, creating a new land empire stretching from the shores of the Mediterranean to as far east as Bactria. In old Greece a fragile balance of power was continually disturbed by wars. Then, from the late third century, the military and diplomatic power of Rome successively defeated and dismantled every one of the post-Alexandrian political structures. The Hellenistic period (c. 323-30 BC) was then one of fragmentation, violent antagonism between large states, and struggles by small polities to retain an illusion of independence. Yet it was also a period of growth, prosperity, and intellectual achievement. A vast network spread of trade, influence and cultural contact, from Italy to Afghanistan and from Russia to Ethiopia, enriching and enlivening centres of wealth, power and intellectual ferment. From Alexander the Great's early days building an empire, via wars with Rome, rampaging pirates, Cleopatra's death and the Jewish diaspora, right up to the death of Hadrian, Chaniotis examines the social structures, economic trends, political upheaval and technological progress of an era that spans five centuries and where, perhaps, modernity began.
Categories: History

Rome Parthia Empires at War

Rome   Parthia  Empires at War

(2016), Great Power Diplomacy in the Hellenistic World (London). —— (2017), Kings and Kingship in the Hellenistic World 350–30 BC (Barnsley). Grajetzki, W. (2011), Greeks and Parthians in Mesopotamia and Beyond 331 BC – 224 AD (London).

Author: Gareth C. Sampson

Publisher: Pen and Sword Military

ISBN: 9781526710154

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 167

A Roman historian examines the motivation and strategy behind Marc Anthony’s invasion of Parthia and the reasons for its ultimate defeat. In the mid-first century BC, the Roman Empire was rivaled only by the Parthian Empire to the east. The first war between these two ancient superpowers resulted in the total defeat of Rome and the death of Marcus Crassus. When Rome collapsed into Civil War in the 1st century, BC, the Parthians took the opportunity conquer the Middle East and drive Rome back into Europe. What followed was two decades of war which saw victories and defeats on both sides. The Romans were finally able to gain a victory over the Parthians thanks to the great general Publius Ventidius. These victories acted as a springboard for Marc Antony’s plans to conquer the Parthian Empire, which ended in ignominious defeat. In this authoritative history, Gareth Sampson analyses the military campaigns and the various battles between Rome and Parthia. He provides fascinating insight into the war that in many ways defined the Middle East for the next 650 years.
Categories: History