Germans Into Nazis

Author: Peter Fritzsche

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674350922

Category: History

Page: 269

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Examines the rise of National Socialism in Germany
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Democrats into Nazis

Middle Class Radicalisation in a Single German Town, 1918-1924

Author: Alex Burkhardt

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 1527540286

Category: History

Page: 283

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How did millions of middle-class Germans come to support extreme nationalist and anti-democratic groups during the Weimar Republic? This troubling and pointedly argued book addresses this question through a targeted case study of Hof, a small Bavarian town, in the five years after the First World War. During this tumultuous period, a series of devastating crises and violent confrontations discredited the representatives of democratic liberalism and handed the initiative to a reinvigorated radical Right. Crucially, these crises were understood by Hof’s inhabitants as part of a broader “European Civil War” unleashed by the Russian Revolution and Treaty of Versailles. This detailed and disturbing study will be read with profit by students and scholars of modern history who seek new insights into the rise of the Nazis, and into the processes of popular radicalisation that did so much to bring about the destruction of the Weimar Republic.
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Germans into Jews

Remaking the Jewish Social Body in the Weimar Republic

Author: Sharon Gillerman

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804771405

Category: History

Page: 248

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Germans into Jews turns to an often overlooked and misunderstood period of German and Jewish history—the years between the world wars. It has been assumed that the Jewish community in Germany was in decline during the Weimar Republic. But, Sharon Gillerman demonstrates that Weimar Jews sought to rejuvenate and reconfigure their community as a means both of strengthening the German nation and of creating a more expansive and autonomous Jewish entity within the German state. These ambitious projects to increase fertility, expand welfare, and strengthen the family transcended the ideological and religious divisions that have traditionally characterized Jewish communal life. Integrating Jewish history, German history, gender history, and social history, this book highlights the experimental and contingent nature of efforts by Weimar Jews to reassert a new Jewish particularism while simultaneously reinforcing their commitment to Germanness.
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The Nazi Conscience

Author: Professor of History Claudia Koonz,Claudia Koonz

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674011724

Category: History

Page: 362

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The author identifies the "ethnic fundamentalism" that infused Nazism, revealing the "conscience" and civic morality that founded the core of Nazi ideology, using a wide variety of sources to flesh out this controversial take on the Nazis. (History)
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Life and Times in Nazi Germany

Author: Lisa Pine

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1474217958

Category: History

Page: 304

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Lisa Pine assembles an impressive array of influential scholars in Life and Times in Nazi Germany to explore the variety and complexity of life in Germany under Hitler's totalitarian regime. The book is a thematic collection of essays that examine the extent to which social and cultural life in Germany was permeated by Nazi aims and ambitions. Each essay deals with a different theme of daily German life in the Nazi era, with topics including food, fashion, health, sport, art, tourism and religion all covered in chapters based on original and expert scholarship. Life and Times in Nazi Germany, which also includes 24 images and helpful end-of-chapter select bibliographies, provides a new lens through which to observe life in Nazi Germany – one that highlights the everyday experience of Germans under Hitler's rule. It illuminates aspects of life under Nazi control that are less well-known and examines the contradictions and paradoxes that characterised daily life in Nazi Germany in order to enhance and sophisticate our understanding of this period in the nation's history. This is a crucial volume for all students of Nazi Germany and the history of Germany in the 20th century.
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Nazi Germany

Author: Jane Caplan

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191647748

Category: History

Page: 344

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The history of National Socialism as movement and regime remains one of the most compelling and intensively studied aspects of twentieth-century history, and one whose significance extends far beyond Germany or even Europe alone. This volume presents an up-to-date and authoritative introduction to the history of Nazi Germany, with ten chapters on the most important themes, each by an expert in the field. Following an introduction which sets out the challenges this period of history has posed to historians since 1945, contributors explain how Nazism emerged as ideology and political movement; how Hitler and his party took power and remade the German state; and how the Nazi 'national community' was organized around a radical and eventually lethal distinction between the 'included' and the 'excluded'. Further chapters discuss the complex relationship between Nazism and Germany's religious faiths; the perverse economic rationality of the regime; the path to war laid down by Hitler's foreign policy; and the intricate and intimate intertwining of war and genocide, with a final chapter on the aftermath of National Socialism in postwar German history and memory.
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War of Annihilation

Combat and Genocide on the Eastern Front, 1941

Author: Geoffrey P. Megargee

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780742544826

Category: History

Page: 177

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On June 22, 1941, Hitler began what would be the most important campaign of the European theater. The war against the Soviet Union would leave tens of millions of Soviet citizens dead and large parts of the country in ruins. This title provides a concise history of the Germans' opening campaign of conquest and genocide in 1941.
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Catholicism and the Roots of Nazism

Religious Identity and National Socialism

Author: Derek Hastings

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199889244

Category: Religion

Page: 312

View: 6633

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Derek Hastings here illuminates an important and largely overlooked aspect of early Nazi history, going back to the years after World War I--when National Socialism first emerged--to reveal its close early ties with Catholicism. Although an antagonistic relationship between the Catholic Church and Hitler's regime developed later during the Third Reich, the early Nazi movement was born in Munich, a city whose population was overwhelmingly Catholic. Focusing on Munich and the surrounding area, Hastings shows how Catholics played a central and hitherto overlooked role in the Nazi movement before the 1923 Beerhall Putsch. He examines the activism of individual Catholic writers, university students, and priests and the striking Catholic-oriented appeals and imagery formulated by the movement. He then discusses why the Nazis embarked on a different path following the party's reconstitution in early 1925, ultimately taking on an increasingly anti-Catholic and anti-Christian identity.
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Beyond the Prison Gates

Punishment and Welfare in Germany, 1850-1933

Author: Warren Rosenblum

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469606763

Category: Law

Page: 344

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Germany today has one of the lowest incarceration rates in the industrialized world, and social welfare principles play an essential role at all levels of the German criminal justice system. Warren Rosenblum examines the roots of this social approach to criminal policy in the reform movements of the Wilhelmine and Weimar periods, when reformers strove to replace state institutions of control and incarceration with private institutions of protective supervision. Reformers believed that private charities and volunteers could diagnose and treat social pathologies in a way that coercive state institutions could not. The expansion of welfare for criminals set the stage for a more economical system of punishment, Rosenblum argues, but it also opened the door to new, more expansive controls over individuals marked as "asocial." With the reformers' success, the issue of who had power over welfare became increasingly controversial and dangerous. Other historians have suggested that the triumph of eugenics in the 1890s was predicated upon the abandonment of liberal and Christian assumptions about human malleability. Rosenblum demonstrates, however, that the turn to "criminal biology" was not a reaction against social reform, but rather an effort to rescue its legitimacy.
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Holocaust

The Nazi Persecution and Murder of the Jews

Author: Peter Longerich

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191613479

Category: History

Page: 672

View: 6196

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A comprehensive history of the Nazi persecution and murder of European Jews, paying detailed attention to an unrivalled range sources. Focusing clearly on the perpetrators and exploring closely the process of decision making, Longerich argues that anti-Semitism was not a mere by-product of the Nazis' political mobilization or an attempt to deflect the attention of the masses, but that anti-Jewish policy was a central tenet of the Nazi movement's attempts to implement, disseminate, and secure National Socialist rule - and one which crucially shaped Nazi policy decisions, from their earliest days in power through to the invasion of the Soviet Union and the Final Solution. As Longerich shows, the 'disappearance' of Jews was designed as a first step towards a racially homogeneous society - first within the 'Reich', later in the whole of a German-dominated Europe.
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