Gender and U.S. Immigration

Contemporary Trends

Author: Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520237391

Category: History

Page: 393

View: 5681

"An important collection of essays that goes beyond the 'immigrant women only' approach to present new perspectives and raise new questions about gender and contemporary U.S. immigration."—Nancy Foner, author of From Ellis Island to JFK: New York's Two Great Waves of Immigration "At last a book that puts gender front and center in debates about the U.S. immigration experience and provides those new to these discussions with an invaluable introduction to the field. Particularly impressive is the substantive breadth of the contributions in this volume, which range from scholarship on the work, family, and political lives of immigrants from all parts of the globe to studies of ethnic, racial, and generational identity. A much needed and essential addition to the bookshelf of any immigration scholar. "—Peggy Levitt, author of The Transnational Villagers "This collection of wonderfully innovative and insightful essays by a distinguished group of social scientists demonstrates the definitive and mutually constitutive connections linking immigration and gender in the contemporary United States. The processes and practices of immigration play a central role in shaping a distinctly gendered distribution of opportunity and suffering, while gendered social structures, preferences, practices, and personal networks play a definitive role in shaping the contours of the immigrant experience and its impact on social, cultural, and economic life."—George Lipsitz, author of American Studies in a Moment of Danger "Hondagneu-Sotelo has assembled some of the foremost scholars in international migration to address the critical yet long-neglected issue of gender. The essays cover topics from employment to motherhood, relate home and host in transnational experiences, and incorporate differences in race, ethnicity, generation, and age in their analyses. A truly remarkable volume."—Lucie Cheng, co-author of Linking Our Lives: Chinese American Women of Los Angeles "Edited by a leading pioneer of immigration studies, this volume offers some of the latest and most brilliant thinking about what migrant men and women bring to the United States, leave behind and create anew. This is a must read for those interested in immigration, gender, and the many meanings of life."—Arlie Russell Hochschild, co-editor with Barbara Ehrenreich of Global Woman: Nannies, Maids, and Sex Workers in the New Economy
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When Women Come First

Gender and Class in Transnational Migration

Author: Sheba Mariam George

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 259

View: 6745

"In this highly insightful and clearly written book, Sheba George gives us a portrait of immigration from two ends of the globe. She traces the experience of nurses from Kerala, India, who migrate to the United States while tracing, also, the challenges to notions of manhood faced by their follower-husbands-a challenge some resolve by elevating roles at church. She shows how notions of gender can thus ricochet from one institution to another. Original, important, and a very good read."--Arlie Russell Hochschild, author of The Commercialization of Intimate Life and co-editor, with Barbara Ehrenreich of Global Woman: Nannies, Maids and Sex Workers in the New Economy "Beautifully written, When Women Come First sensitively exposes the emotional and psychic costs that are part and parcel of the immigrant pursuit of the American dream. It is an outstanding contribution to the burgeoning field of gender and migration."--Yen Le Espiritu, author of Home Bound: Filipino American Lives Across Cultures, Communities, and Countries "With remarkable scope and vivid insight, Sheba George describes the daily lives of a community of Christian immigrants with continuing ties to Kerala, India. George's analysis of the immigrants' struggles around issues of gender and class links experiences at work, at home, and in the church. An important and engaging contribution to the literature on immigration, transnationalism, work, family, gender, and class."--Barrie Thorne, Professor of Sociology and Gender and Women's Studies, University of California, Berkeley "As countries like the United States move towards post-industrial, service-based economies, immigrant women are recruited for all sorts of jobs. In this timely study, Sheba George examines the case of immigrant nurses from India. With lively ethnography and astute theoretical insights, George's book complicates our understandings of the relations between migrant women's work and earnings to autonomy and power, and to the remaking of family, community, congregation and self. This is a powerful book, sure to inspire new questions and directions for the next generation of gender and migration research."--Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo, author of Doméstica: Immigrant Workers Cleaning and Caring in the Shadows of Affluence
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New Perspectives on Gender and Migration

Livelihood, Rights and Entitlements

Author: Nicola Piper

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135911282

Category: Political Science

Page: 362

View: 8251

This book discusses recent theoretical and empirical developments in international migration from a gender perspective. Its main objective is to analyse the diversification and stratification of gendered migratory streams with regard to skill level, labour market integration, and legal status. In turn a migrant’s position in relation to these axes influences access to entitlements and rights. Conceptually, the book builds upon the recent shift in scholarly research on migration, with women-centred research shifting more toward the analysis of gender. Migration is now viewed as a gendered phenomenon that requires more sophisticated theoretical and analytical tools than sex as a dichotomous variable. Theoretical formulations of gender as relational, and as spatially and temporally contextual have begun to inform gendered analyses of migration. The contributions to this book elaborate in more detail the broader social factors that influence migrating women’s and men’s roles, access to resources, facilities and services. Empirically, all major regions are discussed, pointing to common trends such as the increasing significance of the regionalization of migration flows as well as some noteworthy differences.
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Gender and Migration

Author: Caroline B. Brettell

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 074568792X

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 2796

Gender roles, relations, and ideologies are major aspects of migration. This timely book argues that understanding gender relations is vital to a full and more nuanced explanation of both the causes and the consequences of migration, in the past and at present. Through an exploration of gendered labor markets, laws and policies, and the transnational model of migration, Caroline Brettell tackles a variety of issues such as how gender shapes the roles that men and women play in the construction of immigrant family and community life, debates concerning transnational motherhood, and how gender structures the immigrant experience for men and women more broadly. This book will appeal to students and scholars of immigration, race and ethnicity, and gender studies and offers a definitive guide to the key conceptual issues surrounding gender and migration.
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Battleground: Women, Gender, and Sexuality [2 volumes]

Author: Stephanie Brzuzy,Amy Lind

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 0313088004

Category: Social Science

Page: 696

View: 2342

Whether in the home or in the public arenas of media, work, sports, politics, art or religion, women often become embroiled as subjects in the political, social, and cultural debates in America. People on all areas of the political landscape see women in diverse and conflicting ways—as either too liberated or not liberated enough, or whether and how gender and sexual roles are rooted in either biology or culture. Battleground: Women, Gender, and Sexuality helps readers navigate contemporary issues and debates pertaining to women's lives in the United States and globally. This work examines how science and culture intertwine to influence how we think about our identities, desires, relationships, and societal roles today. Battleground: Women, Gender, and Sexuality comprises lengthy, in-depth discussions of the most timely issues that are debated in today's culture, such as, birth control, comparable worth, disability and gender, glass ceiling, immigration, plastic surgery, tattooing, and piercing, same-sex marriage, and sexual assault and sexual harrassment Each essay provides a balanced overview of these hot-button topics, and a list of works for Further Reading after each entry serves as a stepping-stone to more in-depth material for students who are writing papers or researching reports.
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Transforming America: Perspectives on U.S. Immigration [3 volumes]

Perspectives on U.S. Immigration

Author: Michael C. LeMay

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 0313396442

Category: Social Science

Page: 807

View: 3379

Utilizing multiple perspectives of related academic disciplines, this three-volume set of contributed essays enables readers to understand the complexity of immigration to the United States and grasp how our history of immigration has made this nation what it is today.
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God's Heart Has No Borders

How Religious Activists Are Working for Immigrant Rights

Author: Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520942448

Category: Law

Page: 272

View: 2588

In this timely and compelling account of the contribution to immigrant rights made by religious activists in post-1965 and post-9/11 America, Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo provides a comprehensive, close-up view of how Muslim, Christian, and Jewish groups are working to counter xenophobia. Against the hysteria prevalent in today's media, in which immigrants are often painted as a drain on the public coffers, inherently unassimilable, or an outright threat to national security, Hondagneu-Sotelo finds the intersection between migration and religion and calls attention to quieter voices, those dedicated to securing the human dignity of newcomers. Based on years of fieldwork conducted in California's major centers as well as in Chicago, this book considers Muslim Americans defending their civil liberties after 9/11, Christian activists responding to death and violence at the U.S-Mexico border, and Christian and Jewish clergy defending the labor rights of Latino immigrants. At a time when much attention has been given to religious fundamentalism and its capacity to incite violent conflict, "God's Heart Has No Borders "revises our understanding of the role of religion in social movements and demonstrates the nonviolent power of religious groups to address social injustices.
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U.S. Immigration and Education

Cultural and Policy Issues Across the Lifespan

Author: Elena L. Grigorenko, PhD

Publisher: Springer Publishing Company

ISBN: 0826111084

Category: Education

Page: 408

View: 8818

This handbook helps readers to both understand and craft policies to aid the successful acculturation of immigrants in the US. It is an excellent road map for researchers in immigration and education, as well as educational and developmental psychologists, sociologists, economists, and public policy makers. An immigrant from Russia, Dr. Grigorenko weaves her first-hand experiences and strategies into this unique text. It encompasses all available research on immigration and acculturation, from new information on bilingual education to studies of low-skill versus high-skill workers. Key Topics: Immigration and America: current snapshot of US immigration policy and a demographic profile Immigration and education: Pre-K though grade12, higher, and adult education, and the labor market Immigration and incorporation into society: Implications for human development, health, and policy
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The Cultural Politics of U.S. Immigration

Gender, Race, and Media

Author: Leah Perry

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479828777

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 6876

In the 1980s, amid increasing immigration from Latin America, the Caribbean, and Asia, the circle of who was considered American seemed to broaden, reflecting the democratic gains made by racial minorities and women. Although this expanded circle was increasingly visible in the daily lives of Americans through TV shows, films, and popular news media, these gains were circumscribed by the discourse that certain immigrants, for instance single and working mothers, were feared, censured, or welcomed exclusively as laborers. In The Cultural Politics of U.S. Immigration, Leah Perry argues that 1980s immigration discourse in law and popular media was a crucial ingredient in the cohesion of the neoliberal idea of democracy. Blending critical legal analysis with a feminist media studies methodology over a range of sources, including legal documents, congressional debates, and popular media, such as Golden Girls, Who’s the Boss?, Scarface, and Mi Vida Loca, Perry shows how even while “multicultural” immigrants were embraced, they were at the same time disciplined through gendered discourses of respectability. Examining the relationship between law and culture, this book weaves questions of legal status and gender into existing discussions about race and ethnicity to revise our understanding of both neoliberalism and immigration.
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