Gemini Flies

Gemini Flies

This book introduces the crucial three-step test program employed by the Gemini system, covering: The short unmanned orbital flight of Gemini 1 that tested the compatibility of launch vehicle, spacecraft and ground systems.

Author: David J. Shayler

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319681429

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 333

View: 574

In May 1961, President John F. Kennedy committed the United States to landing a man on the moon before the end of the decade. With just a handful of years to pull it off, NASA authorized the Project Gemini space program, which gathered vital knowledge needed to achieve the nation’s goal. This book introduces the crucial three-step test program employed by the Gemini system, covering: The short unmanned orbital flight of Gemini 1 that tested the compatibility of launch vehicle, spacecraft and ground systems. The unmanned suborbital flight of Gemini 2 to establish the integrity of the reentry system and protective heat shield. The three-orbit manned evaluation flight of Gemini 3, christened ‘Molly Brown’ by her crew. A mission recalled orbit by orbit, using mission transcripts, post-flight reports and the astronauts’ own account of their historic journey. The missions of Project Gemini was the pivotal steppingstone between Project Mercury and the Apollo Program. Following the success of its first two unmanned missions and the exploits of Gus Grissom and John Young on Gemini 3, NASA gained the confidence to plan an even bolder step on its next mission, as described in the next book in this series on Gemini 4.
Categories: Technology & Engineering

Gemini 4

Gemini 4

Springer-Praxis – Pioneers in Early Spaceflight – The Gemini Series by David J. Shayler 2018 Gemini Flies! Unmanned Flights and the First Manned Mission NASA Publications 1966 1967 1968 1969 1977 1988 2008 Gemini Mid-Program Conference, ...

Author: David J. Shayler

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319766751

Category: Science

Page: 378

View: 378

The flight of Gemini 4 in June 1965 was conducted barely four years after the first Americans flew in space. It was a bold step by NASA to accomplish the first American spacewalk and to extend the U.S. flight duration record to four days. This would be double the experience gained from the six Mercury missions combined. This daring mission was the first to be directed from the new Mission Control at the Manned Spacecraft Center near Houston, Texas. It also revealed that: Working outside the spacecraft would require further study. Developing the techniques to rendezvous with another object in space would not be as straightforward as NASA had hoped. Living in a small spacecraft for several days was a challenging but necessary step in the quest for even longer flights. Despite the risks, the gamble that astronauts Jim McDivitt and Ed White undertook paid off. Gemini 4 gave NASA the confidence to attempt an even longer flight the next time. That next mission would simulate the planned eight-day duration of an Apollo lunar voyage. Its story is recounted in the next title in this series: Gemini 5: Eight Days in Space or Bust.
Categories: Science

Gemini Flies

Gemini Flies

This book introduces the crucial three-step test program employed by the Gemini system, covering: The short unmanned orbital flight of Gemini 1 that tested the compatibility of launch vehicle, spacecraft and ground systems.

Author: David J. Shayler

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319681419

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 333

View: 534

In May 1961, President John F. Kennedy committed the United States to landing a man on the moon before the end of the decade. With just a handful of years to pull it off, NASA authorized the Project Gemini space program, which gathered vital knowledge needed to achieve the nation’s goal. This book introduces the crucial three-step test program employed by the Gemini system, covering: The short unmanned orbital flight of Gemini 1 that tested the compatibility of launch vehicle, spacecraft and ground systems. The unmanned suborbital flight of Gemini 2 to establish the integrity of the reentry system and protective heat shield. The three-orbit manned evaluation flight of Gemini 3, christened ‘Molly Brown’ by her crew. A mission recalled orbit by orbit, using mission transcripts, post-flight reports and the astronauts’ own account of their historic journey. The missions of Project Gemini was the pivotal steppingstone between Project Mercury and the Apollo Program. Following the success of its first two unmanned missions and the exploits of Gus Grissom and John Young on Gemini 3, NASA gained the confidence to plan an even bolder step on its next mission, as described in the next book in this series on Gemini 4.
Categories: Technology & Engineering

Apollo

Apollo

The text explains how the machines and the men were prepared for the landing on the moon and what would have followed the initial landings.

Author: David J. Shayler

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1852335750

Category: Science

Page: 380

View: 517

The structure of Apollo - The Lost and Forgotten Missions follows the development and in flight testing of the Apollo lunar spacecraft prior to Apollo 11 as well as missions planned following that first landing. Drawing upon combinations of archival documentation from the first four manned Apollo missions and future mission plans evolved in the summer of 1969 Apollo - The Lost and Forgotten Missions will fill this void. The text explains how the machines and the men were prepared for the landing on the moon and what would have followed the initial landings.
Categories: Science

Moon Bound

Moon Bound

The first flight of a Gemini spacecraft, mated to a Titan II launch vehicle, was planned as an unmanned orbital test ... Springer Praxis Books, 161 DOI 10.1007/978-1-4614-3855-7_5, C. Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013 when ...

Author: Colin Burgess

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781461438557

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 371

View: 755

Often lost in the shadow of the first group of astronauts for the Mercury missions, the second and third groups included the leading figures for NASA's activities for the following two decades. “Moon Bound” complements the author’s recently published work, “Selecting the Mercury Seven” (2011), extending the story of the men who helped to launch human spaceflight and broaden the American space program. Although the initial 1959 group became known as the legendary pioneering Mercury astronauts, the astronauts of Groups 2 and 3 gave us many household names. Sixteen astronauts from both groups traveled to the Moon in Project Apollo, with several actually walking on the Moon, one of them being Neil Armstrong. This book draws on interviews to tell the astronauts' personal stories and recreate the drama of that time. It describes the process by which they were selected as astronauts and explains how the criteria had changed since the first group. “Moon Bound” is divided into two parts, recounting the biographies relating to the nine astronauts from NASA’s Group 2 in the first part, and the fourteen finalists in Group 3 in the second part. The stories of both selection groups are narrated through the experiences of four finalists with interesting backgrounds. One of these men is Al Rupp of the USAF who, as a West Point cadet, cheekily helped to steal the Navy mascot goat prior to the annual Army versus Navy game in 1953, thus achieving legendary status in the game’s history. Rupp was killed in a plane crash just two years after being named as a finalist for Group 3. The service career of naval aviator John Yamnicky was also very much the equal of other finalists, but he was killed on September 11, 2001, as he was a passenger on hijacked Flight 77, which was flown into the Pentagon. At the end of the work there are several chapters on how these candidates were prepped for their missions.
Categories: Technology & Engineering

NASA s First Space Shuttle Astronaut Selection

NASA s First Space Shuttle Astronaut Selection

Assembling and Supplying the ISS: The Space Shuttle Fulfils its Mission (2017), ISBN 978-3319404417 Gemini Flies! Unmanned Flights and the First Manned Mission (2018), ISBN 978-3319681412 Gemini 4: An Astronaut Steps Into the Void ...

Author: David J. Shayler

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030457426

Category: Science

Page: 622

View: 698

Unofficially they called themselves the TFNG, or the Thirty-Five New Guys. Officially, they were NASA’s Group 8 astronauts, selected in January 1978 to train for orbital missions aboard the Space Shuttle. Prior to this time only pilots or scientists trained as pilots had been assigned to fly on America’s spacecraft, but with the advent of the innovative winged spacecraft the door was finally opened to non-pilots, including women and minorities. In all, 15 of those selected were categorised as Pilot Astronauts, while the other 20 would train under the new designation of Mission Specialist. Altogether, the Group 8 astronauts would be launched on a total of 103 space missions; some flying only once, while others flew into orbit as many as five times. Sadly, four of their number would perish in the Challenger tragedy in January 1986. In their latest collaborative effort, the authors bring to life the amazing story behind the selection of the first group of Space Shuttle astronauts, examining their varied backgrounds and many accomplishments in a fresh and accessible way through deep research and revealing interviews. Throughout its remarkable 30-year history as the workhorse of NASA’s human spaceflight exploration, twice halted through tragedy, the Shuttle fleet performed with magnificence. So too did these 35 men and women, swept up in the dynamic thrust and ongoing development of America’s Space Shuttle program. "This book on the Group 8 Astronauts, the TFNGs, is an excellent summation of the individuals first selected for the new Space Shuttle Program. It provides insight into what it took to first get the Space Shuttle flying. For any space enthusiast it is a must read." - Robert L. Crippen PLT on STS-1 “As a reader, I had many moments where long, lost memories of the triumph and tragedy of the space shuttle program were brilliantly reawakened at the turn of a page. Loved it! This is a must-have book for every space enthusiast’s library.” - TFNG Mission Specialist Astronaut Richard ‘Mike’ Mullane, author of Riding Rockets: The Outrageous Tales of a Space Shuttle Astronaut “Many of the anecdotes in the book brought back memories of challenges, opportunities, and a team of men and women who were committed not just to the space program, but to one another...I've gone back to it several times as a reference source.” - TFNG Steve Hawley, 5-time Space Shuttle Mission Specialist Astronaut "The TFNG book is incredible and amazingly thorough! The detail in the book is awesome! It is my go-to book for any of the details I’ve forgotten." - TFNG Dr. Rhea Seddon, 3-time Space Shuttle Mission Specialist Astronaut. "I can't believe how detailed and complete it is!!! FANTASTIC work!!!" - TFNG Robert L."Hoot" Gibson, 5-time Space Shuttle Pilot & Commander and former Chief of the NASA Astronaut Office
Categories: Science

Monitoring Volcanoes in the North Pacific

Monitoring Volcanoes in the North Pacific

volcanoes. from. manned. spacecraft. K.G. Dean and J. Dehn (eds.), Monitoring Volcanoes in the North Pacific, Springer Praxis Books, DOI 10.1007/978-3-540-68750-4_10 Table 10.1. Listing of Space Shuttle flights that had the. CHAPTER ...

Author: Kenneson Gene Dean

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9783540687504

Category: Science

Page: 363

View: 99

This book is a visual learning experience as recorded on satellite images of volcanic eruptions and a manual describing how it is used for operational satellite monitoring. The atlas shows examples of the largest eruptions worldwide. The book fills a huge gap in the science of volcano remote sensing. A CD-ROM is included containing all the images and an associated website which will be regularly updated, showing results from new and current eruptions.
Categories: Science

Countdown to a Moon Launch

Countdown to a Moon Launch

During the 1965–1969 period, KSC launched two Ranger, seven Surveyor, two Explorer, and five Lunar Orbiter missions to the Moon, as well as the first fly-bys of Mars and Venus. 1965 1966 1969 • • Gemini—one unmanned launch, five manned.

Author: Jonathan H. Ward

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319177922

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 435

View: 275

Thousands of workers labored at Kennedy Space Center around the clock, seven days a week, for half a year to prepare a mission for the liftoff of Apollo 11. This is the story of what went on during those hectic six months. Countdown to a Moon Launch provides an in-depth look at the carefully choreographed workflow for an Apollo mission at KSC. Using the Apollo 11 mission as an example, readers will learn what went on day by day to transform partially completed stages and crates of parts into a ready-to-fly Saturn V. Firsthand accounts of launch pad accidents, near misses, suspected sabotage, and last-minute changes to hardware are told by more than 70 NASA employees and its contractors. A companion to Rocket Ranch, it includes many diagrams and photographs, some never before published, to illustrate all aspects of the process. NASA’s groundbreaking use of computers for testing and advanced management techniques are also covered in detail. This book will demystify the question of how NASA could build and launch Apollo missions using 1960s technology. You’ll discover that there was no magic involved – just an abundance of discipline, willpower, and creativity.
Categories: Technology & Engineering