Galen on the Pulses

Galen on the Pulses

This is the first translation into a modern Western language of Galen's very substantial body of work on this subject.

Author: Ian Johnston

Publisher: de Gruyter

ISBN: 3110611619

Category: History

Page: 573

View: 768

The arterial pulse was a major aspect of all three major medical traditions - Western, Chinese and Indian. Galen's extant works are the only significant account of Western views surviving from ancient times. Not only does he set out his own views in great detail but he also gives a large amount of information on the views of others whose writings are lost. In the translated treatises in the present work, Galen deals with basic anatomy and physiology, classification of the types of pulses, diagnosis of and from the pulses, causal factors of clinical relevance and the very important matter of the prognostic value of the pulses. This is the first translation into a modern Western language of Galen's very substantial body of work on this subject.
Categories: History

The Western Medical Tradition

The Western Medical Tradition

Galen's pulse - lore exemplifies the unity of his medical and intellectual life . His 16 books on the pulse ... The first , On the Differences between Pulses , set out the terms of the debate . Typically , Galen blamed the need for ...

Author: Lawrence I. Conrad

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521475643

Category: Medical

Page: 574

View: 234

It provides a much-needed account of the very latest historical scholarship.
Categories: Medical

Diagnostic Methods in Greek Medicine

Diagnostic Methods in Greek Medicine

This book presents the first English translation of four of Galen's treatises on the pulses, based on the work of Professor Robert Montraville Green, now revised and provided with full annotation, introduction, and a facing-page Greek text.

Author: Galen

Publisher:

ISBN: 0754660613

Category: Medicine, Greek and Roman

Page: 8002

View: 411

This book presents the first English translation of four of Galen's treatises on the pulses, based on the work of Professor Robert Montraville Green, now revised and provided with full annotation, introduction, and a facing-page Greek text. These treatises constitute a major contribution to the science of cardiology, the first complete such work in the history of medical literature.
Categories: Medicine, Greek and Roman

The Cambridge Companion to Galen

The Cambridge Companion to Galen

The problem is,says Galen, that if youcalla pulse'full', that will lead peopletothink you mean that the artery is full of something –e.g.airyor watery stuff. But in fact, those who call pulsesfulldon't mean this at all, but something ...

Author: R. J. Hankinson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139826913

Category: Philosophy

Page:

View: 378

Galen of Pergamum (AD 129–c.216) was the most influential doctor of later antiquity, whose work was to influence medical theory and practice for more than fifteen hundred years. He was a prolific writer on anatomy, physiology, diagnosis and prognosis, pulse-doctrine, pharmacology, therapeutics, and the theory of medicine; but he also wrote extensively on philosophical topics, making original contributions to logic and the philosophy of science, and outlining a scientific epistemology which married a deep respect for empirical adequacy with a commitment to rigorous rational exposition and demonstration. He was also a vigorous polemicist, deeply involved in the doctrinal disputes among the medical schools of his day. This volume offers an introduction to and overview of Galen's achievement in all these fields, while seeking also to evaluate that achievement in the light of the advances made in Galen scholarship over the past thirty years.
Categories: Philosophy

A Short History of Cardiology

A Short History of Cardiology

Galen himself was , in Bedford's words , the foremost sphygmologist of antiquity , indeed of all time ' . He wrote 18 books on the pulse and his teaching on this subject dominated clinical practice until long after his physiological ...

Author: Peter Fleming

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004418509

Category: Medical

Page: 260

View: 118

The story of cardiology told in this book begins in about 1700, when the first attempts were made to study the diseased heart in life (the subject matter of cardiology), as distinct from its appearance after death; it ends, rather arbitrarily, in 1970.
Categories: Medical

Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy Volume 50

Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy  Volume 50

Here Galen describes a process where external cold alters the pulse through a chain of intermediate external causes that ultimately cause fever that alters in turn the function of the pulse , which is one of the cohesive causes ( ix .

Author: Victor Caston

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191084072

Category: Philosophy

Page: 336

View: 670

Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy is a volume of original articles on all aspects of ancient philosophy. The articles may be of substantial length, and include critical notices of major books. OSAP is now published twice yearly, in both hardback and paperback. "'Have you seen the latest OSAP?' is what scholars of ancient philosophy say to each other when they meet in corridors or on coffee breaks. Whether you work on Plato or Aristotle, on Presocratics or sophists, on Stoics, Epicureans, or Sceptics, on Roman philosophers or Greek Neoplatonists, you are liable to find OSAP articles now dominant in the bibliography of much serious published work in your particular subject: not safe to miss." - Malcolm Schofield, Cambridge University "OSAP was founded to provide a place for long pieces on major issues in ancient philosophy. In the years since, it has fulfilled this role with great success, over and over again publishing groundbreaking papers on what seemed to be familiar topics and others surveying new ground to break. It represents brilliantly the vigour—and the increasingly broad scope—of scholarship in ancient philosophy, and shows us all how the subject should flourish." - M.M. McCabe, King's College London
Categories: Philosophy

Feeling Pleasures

Feeling Pleasures

Wren referred to 'Galen's curiosity about pulses', and the Alexandrian physician's curiosity manifested itself in a series of writings. Galen claimed that feeling the pulse involved not simply counting beats: his method was emphatically ...

Author: Joe Moshenska

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191022036

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 384

View: 655

The sense of touch had a deeply uncertain status in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It had long been seen as the most certain and reliable of the senses, and also as biologically necessary: each of the other senses could be relinquished, but to lose touch was to lose life itself. Alternatively, touch was seen as dangerously bodily, and too fully involved in sensual and sexual pleasures, to be of true worth. Feeling Pleasures argues that this tension came to the fore during the English Renaissance, and allowed some of the central debates of this period—surrounding the nature of human experience, of the material world, and of the relationship between the human and the divine—to proceed through discussions of touch. It also argues that the unstable status of touch was of particular import to the poetry of this period. By bringing touch to the fore in a period usually associated with the dominance of vision and optics, Joe Moshenska offers reconsiderations of major English poets, especially Edmund Spenser and John Milton, while exploring a range of spheres in which touch assumed new significance. These include theological debates surrounding relics and the Eucharist in the work of Erasmus, Thomas Cranmer and Lancelot Andrewes; the philosophical history of tickling; the touching of paintings and sculptures in a European context; faith healing and experimental science; and the early reception of Chinese medicine in England.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Transactions American Philosophical Society vol 54 Part 7 1964

Transactions  American Philosophical Society  vol  54  Part 7  1964

351 ) , there was extensive study of the changes in Galen divided the pulse into four parts : diastole The the pulse subsequent to the classical period . E. F. and systole , separated by two periods of rest .

Author:

Publisher: American Philosophical Society

ISBN: 1422376192

Category:

Page:

View: 685

Categories:

Medicine and Paradoxography in the Ancient World

Medicine and Paradoxography in the Ancient World

For example, in the case of the illness of the emperor's young son Commodus the imperial chamberlain Peitholaus is at first amazed by Galen's claim that an inflammation of the tonsils could alter the boy's pulse (Koi Toijt' &Kočooq à ...

Author: George Kazantzidis

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110661774

Category: History

Page: 233

View: 221

The present volume offers a systematic discussion of the complex relationship between medicine and paradoxography in the ancient world. For a long time, the relationship between the two has been assumed to be virtually non-existent. Paradoxography is concerned with disclosing a world full of marvels and wondrous occurrences without providing an answer as to how these phenomena can be explained. Its main aim is to astonish and leave its readers bewildered and confused. By contrast, medicine is committed to the rational explanation of human phusis, which makes it, in a number of significant ways, incompatible with thauma. This volume moves beyond the binary opposition between ‘rational’ and ‘non-rational’ modes of thinking, by focusing on instances in which the paradox is construed with direct reference to established medical sources and beliefs or, inversely, on cases in which medical discourse allows space for wonder and admiration. Its aim is to show that thauma, rather than present a barrier, functions as a concept which effectively allows for the dialogue between medicine and paradoxography in the ancient world.
Categories: History

What Did the Romans Know

What Did the Romans Know

Indeed, Galen himself fills in the details of his prognosis over the next few paragraphs and shows that it is his knowledge of pulses in particular, and of how specific internal bodily processes associated with disease affect pulses, ...

Author: Daryn Lehoux

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226471150

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 106

What did the Romans know about their world? Quite a lot, as Daryn Lehoux makes clear in this fascinating and much-needed contribution to the history and philosophy of ancient science. Lehoux contends that even though many of the Romans’ views about the natural world have no place in modern science—the umbrella-footed monsters and dog-headed people that roamed the earth and the stars that foretold human destinies—their claims turn out not to be so radically different from our own. Lehoux draws upon a wide range of sources from what is unquestionably the most prolific period of ancient science, from the first century BC to the second century AD. He begins with Cicero’s theologico-philosophical trilogy On the Nature of the Gods, On Divination, and On Fate, illustrating how Cicero’s engagement with nature is closely related to his concerns in politics, religion, and law. Lehoux then guides readers through highly technical works by Galen and Ptolemy, as well as the more philosophically oriented physics and cosmologies of Lucretius, Plutarch, and Seneca, all the while exploring the complex interrelationships between the objects of scientific inquiry and the norms, processes, and structures of that inquiry. This includes not only the tools and methods the Romans used to investigate nature, but also the Romans’ cultural, intellectual, political, and religious perspectives. Lehoux concludes by sketching a methodology that uses the historical material he has carefully explained to directly engage the philosophical questions of incommensurability, realism, and relativism. By situating Roman arguments about the natural world in their larger philosophical, political, and rhetorical contexts, What Did the Romans Know? demonstrates that the Romans had sophisticated and novel approaches to nature, approaches that were empirically rigorous, philosophically rich, and epistemologically complex.
Categories: History

Ancient Histories of Medicine

Ancient Histories of Medicine

... a passage in Galen's On Differences between Pulses , 52 After reporting Alexander's double definition of the pulse ( an objective ... he thinks — as does Heraclides of Tarentum in his [ arguments ) against Herophilus ' On Pulses ” .

Author: Philip J. Eijk

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004105557

Category: Medical

Page: 537

View: 197

This collection of essays focuses on the ways in which Greek and Latin authors viewed and wrote about the history of medicine in the ancient world. Special attention is given to medical doxography, i.e. the description of the characteristic doctrines of the great medical authorities of the past. The volume examines the various attitudes to the history of medicine adopted by a wide range of ancient writers (e.g. Aristotle, Galen, Celsus, Herophilus, Soranus, Oribasius, Caelius Aurelianus). It discusses the historical sense of ancient medicine, the variety of versions of the medical past that were created and the wide range of purposes and strategies which medico-historical writing served. It also deals with the question of the sources, the role of historiographical traditions and the variety of literary genres of ancient medico-historical writing.
Categories: Medical

Touch and the Ancient Senses

Touch and the Ancient Senses

5 This is discounting the synopsis of the pulse, which is transmitted in the Galenic Corpus, but may be a later summary, and the lost books of commentary on Archigenes' On Pulses. On Galen's pulse-lore see Harris (1973: 397–431) and the ...

Author: Alex Purves

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317516668

Category: History

Page: 230

View: 251

Unlike the other senses, touch ranges beyond a single sense organ, encompassing not only the skin but also the interior of the body. It mediates almost every aspect of interpersonal relations in antiquity, from the everyday to the erotic, just as it also provides a primary point of contact between the individual and the outside world. The essays in this volume explore the ways in which touch plays a defining role in science, art, philosophy, and medicine, and shapes our understanding of topics ranging from aesthetics and poetics to various religious and ritual practices. Whether we locate the sense of touch on the surface of the skin, within the body or – less tangibly still – within the emotions, the sensory impact of touching raises a broad range of interpretive and phenomenological questions. This is the first volume of its kind to explore the sense of touch in antiquity, bringing a variety of disciplinary approaches to bear on the sense that is usually disregarded as the most base and obvious of the five. In these pages, by contrast, we find in touch a complex and fascinating indicator of the body’s relation to object, environment, and self.
Categories: History

Pulse

Pulse

Jalinus (Galen) believed that the expansion of the artery might be unequal along various diameters of the artery and a variety of pulses could be felt based on the extent of expansion on each side. For instance, there could be a full ...

Author: Mudasir Khazir

Publisher: Educreation Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 180

View: 479

This book is an attempt towards simplifying and reviving the subject of pulse examination as described in Unani system of medicine, for its better understanding. It also includes possible correlations between classical and conventional views about pulse and the theories governing the generation and changes in pulse waves. It is aimed at re-establishing the clinical significance of pulse examination.
Categories: Education

Medicine and the Five Senses

Medicine and the Five Senses

32 Galen was proud to continue the tradition of Praxagoras and Herophilus . Although his explanation for the pulse differs substantially from our own - he ascribed the power of pulsation to the arterial ...

Author: Symposium on Medicine and the Five Senses

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521361141

Category: Medical

Page: 331

View: 744

Doctors must use their five senses in their daily practice, especially in diagnosing disease. Many of the essays in this illustrated collection focus on the diagnostic setting, from the Greek physicians to CAT scanners, and on the ways in which medical education has attempted to train doctors to use their senses. Other essays explore the wider presentation of medicine, anatomy, and disease, through the visual arts and the media. They demonstrate the extent to which medicine is a visual activity, but do not neglect the other senses, as well as historical preoccupations with the role of reason in the doctor's life.
Categories: Medical

Efficient Causation

Efficient Causation

(12: Galen, Causes of Pulses, 9:2–3 Kühn) The preceding causes, then, are the internal processes that in turn condition the containing causes, producing alterations in them that then directly affect the pulse itself; and those internal ...

Author: Tad M. Schmaltz

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780199782178

Category: Philosophy

Page: 372

View: 771

"This volume is a contribution to the Oxford Philosophical Concepts series, the main goal of which is to provide historical accounts of the development of central philosophical concepts. Among these concepts would seem to be that of efficient causation (or, today, simply causation). Causation is now commonly supposed to involve a succession that instantiates some law-like regularity. This understanding of causality has a history that includes various interrelated conceptions of efficient causation that date from ancient Greek philosophy and that extend to contemporary discussions of causation in metaphysics and philosophy of science. The consideration here of this history is divided into three sections comprising eleven chapters total. The first section concerns concepts of efficient causation in Aristotle, the Stoics, late antiquity and earlier medieval philosophy, and later medieval philosophy dating from Ibn Sīnā (Avicenna) to Ockham. The second concerns the different forms of this concept in the modern period, starting with late scholasticism (as represented in Suaréz) and Descartes, and including Spinoza and Leibniz, Malebranche and Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. Finally, there is a third section divided into a consideration of conceptions of causation in contemporary philosophy that derive from the work of Hume and Aristotle, respectively. A distinctive feature of the volume is that it also includes four short "Reflections" that explore the significance of the concept of efficient causation for literature, the history of music, the history of science and contemporary art theory"--
Categories: Philosophy

Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought

Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought

(Galen, On the Causes of Pulses 9. 2–3) These 'dispositions' are not the standing conditions of the body prior to the action of the antecedent cause; nor are they general susceptibilities to disease (although Galen explicitly believes ...

Author: R. J. Hankinson

Publisher: Clarendon Press

ISBN: 9780191519215

Category: Philosophy

Page: 516

View: 360

R. J. Hankinson traces the history of ancient Greek thinking about causation and explanation, from its earliest beginnings around 600 BC through to the middle of the first millennium of the Christian era. The ancient Greeks were the first Western civilization to subject the ideas of cause and explanation to rigorous and detailed analysis, and to attempt to construct theories about them on the basis of logic and experience. Hankinson examines the ways in which they dealt with questions about how and why things happen as and when they do, about the basic constitution and structure of things, about function and purpose, laws of nature, chance, coincidence, and responsibility. Such diverse questions are unified by the fact that they are all demands for an account of the world that will render it amenable to prediction and control; they are therefore at the root of both philosophical and scientific enquiry. Hankinson draws on a wide range of original sources, in philosophy, natural sciences, medicine, history, and the law, in order to create a synoptic picture of the growth and development of these central concepts in the Graeco-Roman world.
Categories: Philosophy

Diseases in the District of Maine 1772 1820

Diseases in the District of Maine 1772   1820

450– 370 bce)10 considered fever an imbalance of the humors that was determined by touch (skin warmer than normal) and an accelerated pulse.11 Claudius Galen of Pergamum (c. 131– 201 ce), however, thought fever itself was a disease ...

Author: Richard J. Kahn

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190053260

Category: Medical

Page: 240

View: 906

Jeremiah Barker practiced medicine in rural Maine up until his retirement in 1818. Throughout his practice of fifty years, he documented his constant efforts to keep up with and contribute to the medical literature in a changing medical landscape, as practice and authority shifted from historical to scientific methods. He performed experiments and autopsies, became interested in the new chemistry of Lavoisier, risked scorn in his use of alkaline remedies, studied epidemic fever and approaches to bloodletting, and struggled to understand epidemic fever, childbed fever, cancer, public health, consumption, mental illness, and the "dangers of spirituous liquors." Dr. Barker intended to publish his Diseases in the District of Maine 1772-1820 by subscription - advance pledges to purchase the published volume - but for reasons that remain uncertain, that never happened. For the first time, Barker's never before published work has been transcribed and presented in its entirety with extensive annotations, a five-chapter introduction to contextualize the work, and a glossary to make it accessible to 21st century general readers, genealogists, students, and historians. This engaging and insightful new publication allows modern readers to reimagine medicine as practiced by a rural physician in New England. We know much about how elite physicians practiced 200 years ago, but very little about the daily practice of an ordinary rural doctor, attending the ordinary rural patient. Barker's manuscript is written in a clear and engaging style, easily enjoyed by general readers as well as historians, with extensive footnotes and a glossary of terms. Barker himself intended his book to be "understood by those destitute of medical science."
Categories: Medical

Christian Intellectuals and the Roman Empire

Christian Intellectuals and the Roman Empire

Galen , Hipp . Epid . 2.6.41 ( CMG Suppl . Or . V 2 942 ) . For the argument that the passage should be emended to refer to ... with Walzer 1949 , 43-44 . 124. Galen , Differences of Pulses 2.4 ( 8.579 Kühn ) . 125. Galen , Pecc . Dig .

Author: Jared Secord

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9780271087641

Category: History

Page: 214

View: 987

Early in the third century, a small group of Greek Christians began to gain prominence and legitimacy as intellectuals in the Roman Empire. Examining the relationship that these thinkers had with the broader Roman intelligentsia, Jared Secord contends that the success of Christian intellectualism during this period had very little to do with Christianity itself. With the recognition that Christian authors were deeply engaged with the norms and realities of Roman intellectual culture, Secord examines the thought of a succession of Christian literati that includes Justin Martyr, Tatian, Julius Africanus, and Origen, comparing each to a diverse selection of his non-Christian contemporaries. Reassessing Justin’s apologetic works, Secord reveals Christian views on martyrdom to be less distinctive than previously believed. He shows that Tatian’s views on Greek culture informed his reception by Christians as a heretic. Finally, he suggests that the successes experienced by Africanus and Origen in the third century emerged as consequences not of any change in attitude toward Christianity by imperial authorities but of a larger shift in intellectual culture and imperial policies under the Severan dynasty. Original and erudite, this volume demonstrates how distorting the myopic focus on Christianity as a religion has been in previous attempts to explain the growth and success of the Christian movement. It will stimulate new research in the study of early Christianity, classical studies, and Roman history.
Categories: History