Frozen Earth

The Once and Future Story of Ice Ages

Author: J. D. Macdougall

Publisher: Taylor & Francis US

ISBN: 9780520239227

Category: Science

Page: 256

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Explores the causes and effects of ice ages, explains how the Pleistocene Ice Age has shaped the earth's landscape and influenced human evolution, and offers authoritative speculation and explanations of future climate changes, their causes, and their impact on both the natural world and human civilization.
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Frozen Earth

The Once and Future Story of Ice Ages

Author: Doug Macdougall

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520954947

Category: Science

Page: 278

View: 4570

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In this engrossing and accessible book, Doug Macdougall explores the causes and effects of ice ages that have gripped our planet throughout its history, from the earliest known glaciation—nearly three billion years ago—to the present. Following the development of scientific ideas about these dramatic events, Macdougall traces the lives of many of the brilliant and intriguing characters who have contributed to the evolving understanding of how ice ages come about. As it explains how the great Pleistocene Ice Age has shaped the earth's landscape and influenced the course of human evolution, Frozen Earth also provides a fascinating look at how science is done, how the excitement of discovery drives scientists to explore and investigate, and how timing and chance play a part in the acceptance of new scientific ideas. Macdougall describes the awesome power of cataclysmic floods that marked the melting of the glaciers of the Pleistocene Ice Age. He probes the chilling evidence for "Snowball Earth," an episode far back in the earth's past that may have seen our planet encased in ice from pole to pole. He discusses the accumulating evidence from deep-sea sediment cores, as well as ice cores from Greenland and the Antarctic, that suggests fast-changing ice age climates may have directly impacted the evolution of our species and the course of human migration and civilization. Frozen Earth also chronicles how the concept of the ice age has gripped the imagination of scientists for almost two centuries. It offers an absorbing consideration of how current studies of Pleistocene climate may help us understand earth's future climate changes, including the question of when the next glacial interval will occur.
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Why Geology Matters

Decoding the Past, Anticipating the Future

Author: Doug Macdougall

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520948920

Category: Science

Page: 304

View: 3774

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Volcanic dust, climate change, tsunamis, earthquakes—geoscience explores phenomena that profoundly affect our lives. But more than that, as Doug Macdougall makes clear, the science also provides important clues to the future of the planet. In an entertaining and accessibly written narrative, Macdougall gives an overview of Earth’s astonishing history based on information extracted from rocks, ice cores, and other natural archives. He explores such questions as: What is the risk of an asteroid striking Earth? Why does the temperature of the ocean millions of years ago matter today? How are efforts to predict earthquakes progressing? Macdougall also explains the legacy of greenhouse gases from Earth’s past and shows how that legacy shapes our understanding of today’s human-caused climate change. We find that geoscience in fact illuminates many of today’s most pressing issues—the availability of energy, access to fresh water, sustainable agriculture, maintaining biodiversity—and we discover how, by applying new technologies and ideas, we can use it to prepare for the future.
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The Rough Guide to the Energy Crisis

Author: Rough Guides

Publisher: Rough Guides UK

ISBN: 184836329X

Category: Science

Page: 304

View: 1458

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From the opening and closing of oceans over millions of years to the overnight reshaping of landscapes by volcanoes, the Earth beneath our feet is constantly changing. The Rough Guide to the Earth explores all aspects of our dynamic planet, from the planet’s origins and evolution and the seasons and tides to melting ice caps, glaciers and climate change. Featuring many spectacular images and helpful diagrams, this Rough Guide provides a fascinating and accessible introduction to Earth science.
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Nature’s Clocks

How Scientists Measure the Age of Almost Everything

Author: Doug Macdougall

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520261615

Category: Nature

Page: 288

View: 9736

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"A lucid and engaging account of the scientific revolution that changed the way we think about our planet and ourselves."—James Lawrence Powell, author of Grand Canyon and Mysteries of Terra Firma
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Earth

A Tenant's Manual

Author: Frank H. T. Rhodes

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801466202

Category: Nature

Page: 400

View: 5783

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"It’s impossible to grasp the whole planet or integrate all the descriptions of it. But because we live here, we have to try. This is not just an artistic compulsion or an existential yearning, still less an academic exercise. It’s a survival issue. This is the only planet we have. We’re stuck here, and we don’t own the place—it would be the height of arrogance to assume that we do. We’re tenants here, not owners, but we’re tenants with hope for a long-term tenancy. We want to extend our lease just as far as we can."—from Earth: A Tenant’s Manual In Earth: A Tenant’s Manual, the distinguished geologist Frank H. T. Rhodes, President Emeritus of Cornell University, provides a sweeping, accessible, and deeply informed guide to the home we all share, showing us how we might best preserve the Earth’s livability for ourselves and future generations. Rhodes begins by setting the scene for our active planet and explaining how its location and composition determine how the Earth works and why it teems with life. He emphasizes the changes that are of concern to us today, from earthquakes to climate change and the clashes over the energy resources needed for the Earth’s exploding population. He concludes with an extended exploration of humanity’s prospects on a complex, protean, and ultimately finite world. It is not a question of whether the planet is sustainable; the challenge facing life on Earth—and the life of the Earth—is whether an expanding and high-consumption species like ours is sustainable. Only new resources, new priorities, new policies and, most of all, new knowledge, can reverse the damage that humanity is doing to our home—and ourselves. A sustainable human future, Rhodes concludes in this eloquent, sobering, but ultimately optimistic book, will require a sense of responsible stewardship, for we are not owners of this planet; we are tenants. Surveying the systems, large and small, that govern Earth’s processes and influence its changes, Rhodes addresses the negative consequences of human activities for the health of its regulatory systems but offers practical suggestions as to how we might effect repairs, or at least limit further damage to our home.
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The Moon in the Nautilus Shell

Discordant Harmonies Reconsidered

Author: Daniel B. Botkin

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019997697X

Category: Science

Page: 448

View: 9059

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Why do we keep talking about so many environmental problems and rarely solve any? If these are scientific issues, then why can't scientists solve them or at least agree on what to do? In his new book, The Moon in the Nautilus Shell, ecologist Daniel Botkin explains why. For one thing, although we live in a world of constantly changing environments and talk a lot about climate change, most of our environmental laws, policies, and scientific premises are based on the idea that the environment is constant, never changing, except when people affect it. For another, we have lost contact with nature in personal ways. Disconnected from our surroundings, we lack the deep understanding and feelings about the environment to make meaningful judgments. The environment has become just another one of those special interests that interferes with our lives. Poised to be a core text of the twenty-first century environmental movement, The Moon in the Nautilus Shell challenges us to think critically about our role in nature.
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People of the Earth

An Introduction to World Prehistory

Author: Brian M. Fagan,Nadia Durrani

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317346815

Category: Social Science

Page: 560

View: 2944

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Understand major developments of human prehistory People of the Earth: An Introduction to World Prehistory 14/e, provides an exciting journey though the 7-million-year-old panorama of humankind's past. This internationally renowned text provides the only truly global account of human prehistory from the earliest times through the earliest civilizations. Written in an accessible way for beginning students, People of the Earth shows how today's diverse humanity developed biologically and culturally over millions of years against a background of constant climatic change.
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Catastrophes!

Earthquakes, Tsunamis, Tornadoes, and Other Earth-Shattering Disasters

Author: Donald R. Prothero

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9781421401478

Category: Nature

Page: 360

View: 5496

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Eerie, fascinating, and often moving, these tales of geologic history and human fortitude and folly will stay with you long after you put the book down.
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Deep Things out of Darkness

A History of Natural History

Author: John G. T. Anderson

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520954459

Category: Nature

Page: 366

View: 5133

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Natural history, the deliberate observation of the environment, is arguably the oldest science. From purely practical beginnings as a way of finding food and shelter, natural history evolved into the holistic, systematic study of plants, animals, and the landscape. Deep Things out of Darkness chronicles the rise, decline, and ultimate revival of natural history within the realms of science and public discourse. Ecologist John G. T. Anderson focuses his account on the lives and contributions of an eclectic group of men and women, from John Ray, John Muir, Charles Darwin, and Rachel Carson, who endured remarkable hardships and privations in order to learn more about their surroundings. Written in an engaging narrative style and with an extensive bibliography of primary sources, the book charts the journey of the naturalist’s endeavor from prehistory to the present, underscoring the need for natural history in an era of dynamic environmental change.
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