From Latin to Romance in Sound Charts

From Latin to Romance in Sound Charts

This handbook offers a synopsis of the regular changes that Latin words underwent in the course of their evolution into the modern Romance languages (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, and French).

Author: Peter Boyd-Bowman

Publisher: Georgetown University Press

ISBN: 087840077X

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 177

View: 818

This handbook offers a synopsis of the regular changes that Latin words underwent in the course of their evolution into modern Romance languages (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, and French, with their English cognates). Although it is intended for the nonspecialist, students of Romance philology will find it useful as a ready reference and as a source of abundant examples of Latin sound changes. The synopsis is presented in the form of separate alphabetical charts for each major sound change. The rules, stated as simply as possible, do not generally explain the evolution of the changes, but only the end results. For those desiring further information, there are notes after most rules outlining exceptions to or modifications of that rule and often sketching successive stages in the development of the sound. Several minor or sporadic sound changes are also treated in note form. Each chart is supplemented by a list of additional words illustrating the same sound change. From Latin to Roman in Sound Charts has been used successfully as a graduate level text for such courses as History of Spanish, History of French, and Romance Linguistics.
Categories: Foreign Language Study

Gender from Latin to Romance

Gender from Latin to Romance

This book explores grammatical gender in the Romance languages and dialects and its evolution from Latin.

Author: Michele Loporcaro

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199656547

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 416

View: 552

This book explores grammatical gender in the Romance languages and dialects and its evolution from Latin. Michele Loporcaro investigates the significant diversity found in the Romance varieties in this regard; he draws on data from the Middle Ages to the present from all the Romance languages and dialects, discussing examples from Romanian to Portuguese and crucially also focusing on less widely-studied varieties such as Sursilvan, Neapolitan, and Asturian. The investigation first reveals that several varieties display more complex systems than the binary masculine/feminine contrast familiar from modern French or Italian. Moreover, it emerges that traditional accounts, whereby neuter gender was lost in the spoken Latin of the late Empire, cannot be correct: instead, the neuter gender underwent a range of different transformations from Late Latin onwards, which are responsible for the different systems that can be observed today across the Romance languages. The volume provides a detailed description of many of these systems, which in turns reveals a wealth of fascinating data, such as varieties where 'husbands' are feminine and others where 'wives' are masculine; dialects in which nouns overtly mark gender, but only in certain syntactic contexts; and one Romance variety (Asturian) in which it appears that grammatical gender has split into two concurrent systems. The volume will appeal to linguists from a range of backgrounds, including Romance linguistics, historical linguistics, typology, and morphosyntax, and is also of relevance to those working in sociology, gender studies, and psychology.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

From Latin to Romance

From Latin to Romance

This book examines the grammatical changes that took place in the transition from Latin to the Romance languages. The emerging languages underwent changes in three fundamental areas involving the noun phrase, verb phrase, and the sentence.

Author: Adam Ledgeway

Publisher:

ISBN: 0191613207

Category: Romance languages

Page: 463

View: 663

This volume examines grammatical changes during the transition from Latin to the Romance languages and the factors proposed to explain them. It challenges orthodoxy, presents perspectives on language change, structure, and variation, and will appeal to Romance linguists, Latinists, philologists, andhistorical linguists of all persuasions.
Categories: Romance languages

Past Participles from Latin to Romance

Past Participles from Latin to Romance

From Latin through the Romance languages, which types of past participle survived?

Author: Richard Laurent

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520098329

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 574

View: 560

From Latin through the Romance languages, which types of past participle survived? Which older, "irregular" types disappeared and which older, "regular" types proliferated? Which new types of past participles emerged, which proved popular in standard Romance languages, and which exist in a wide range of dialects? The author explores reasons for the expansion or contraction of each type, in each area.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Gender from Latin to Romance

Gender from Latin to Romance

"This text explores grammatical gender in the Romance languages and dialects and its evolution from Latin.

Author: Michele Loporcaro

Publisher:

ISBN: 0191848107

Category:

Page:

View: 666

This text explores grammatical gender in the Romance languages and dialects and its evolution from Latin. It outlines the significant diversity found in the Romance varieties in this regard and uses this variation to show that traditional accounts of the loss of neuter gender cannot be correct.
Categories:

Cognitive Linguistics and Lexical Change

Cognitive Linguistics and Lexical Change

The book should appeal to scholars interested in historical Romance linguistics, cognitive linguistics, and lexical change.

Author: Natalya I. Stolova

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing Company

ISBN: 9789027269867

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 261

View: 239

This monograph offers the first in-depth lexical and semantic analysis of motion verbs in their development from Latin to nine Romance languages — Spanish, French, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan, Occitan, Sardinian, and Raeto-Romance — demonstrating that the patterns of innovation and continuity attested in the data can be accounted for in cognitive linguistic terms. At the same time, the study illustrates how the insights gained from Latin and Romance historical data have profound implications for the cognitive approaches to language — in particular, for Leonard Talmy’s motion-framing typology and George Lakoff and Mark Johnson’s conceptual metaphor theory. The book should appeal to scholars interested in historical Romance linguistics, cognitive linguistics, and lexical change.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

The Development of Romance Clitic Pronouns

The Development of Romance Clitic Pronouns

The series is a platform for contributions of all kinds to this rapidly developing field.

Author: Dieter Wanner

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 9783110893069

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 698

View: 945

The series is a platform for contributions of all kinds to this rapidly developing field. General problems are studied from the perspective of individual languages, language families, language groups, or language samples. Conclusions are the result of a deepened study of empirical data. Special emphasis is given to little-known languages, whose analysis may shed new light on long-standing problems in general linguistics.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Discourse and Pragmatic Markers from Latin to the Romance Languages

Discourse and Pragmatic Markers from Latin to the Romance Languages

This book examines the historical development of discourse and pragmatic markers across the Romance languages.

Author: Chiara Ghezzi

Publisher: Oxford University Press (UK)

ISBN: 9780199681600

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 299

View: 780

This book examines the historical development of discourse and pragmatic markers across the Romance languages. These markers serve to indicate the organization of the discourse, the speaker's relationship with the interlocutor, and the speaker's stance with regard to the information expressed. Their relevance is in assisting interpretation, despite the fact that they have little or no propositional content. In this book, distinguished scholars from different theoretical backgrounds analyse the different classes of discourse and pragmatic markers found in Latin and the Romance languages and explore both their diachronic development and their synchronic properties. Following an introduction and overview of the development of these markers, the book is divided into two parts: the first part investigates pragmatic markers developed from verbs, such as Latin quaeso, Romanian ma rog, and Spanish o sea; the second looks at adverbs as discourse markers, such as French deja and Italian gia, Romanian atunci and Portuguese alias. Chapters address a variety of theoretical issues such as the cyclic nature of functional developments, the nature of grammaticalization and pragmaticalization, semantic change, and the emergence of new pragmatic values. The arguments presented also have consequences for any analysis of the interfaces between grammar, discourse, and interaction.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

From Latin to Romanian

From Latin to Romanian

Author: Marius Sala

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015061013515

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 168

View: 348

Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Vowel Length from Latin to Romance

Vowel Length from Latin to Romance

This book investigates the changes that affected vowel length during the development of Latin into the Romance languages and dialects.

Author: Michele Loporcaro

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780199656554

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 400

View: 205

This book investigates the changes that affected vowel length during the development of Latin into the Romance languages and dialects. In Latin, vowel length was contrastive (e.g. pila 'ball' vs. pila 'pile', like English bit vs. beat), but no modern Romance language has retained that same contrast. However, many non-standard Romance dialects (as well as French, up to the early 20th century) have developed novel vowel length contrasts, which are investigated in detail here. Unlike previous studies of this phenomenon, this book combines detailed historical evidence spanning three millennia (as attested by extant texts) with extensive data from present-day Romance varieties collected from first-hand fieldwork, which are subjected to both phonological and experimental phonetic analysis. Professor Loporcaro puts forward a detailed account of the loss of contrastive vowel length in late Latin, showing that this happened through the establishment of a process which lengthened all stressed vowels in open syllables, as in modern Italian casa ['ka:sa]. His analysis has implications for many of the most widely-debated issues relating to the origin of novel vowel length contrasts in Romance, which are also shown to have been preserved to different degrees in different areas. The detailed investigation of the rise and fall of vowel length in dozens of lesser-known (non-standard) varieties is crucial in understanding the development of this aspect of Romance historical phonology, and will be of interest not only to researchers and students in comparative Romance linguistics, but also, more generally, to phonologists and those interested in historical linguistics beyond the Latin-Romance language family.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

From Latin to Romance

From Latin to Romance

1 From Latin to Romance: introduction 1.1 From Latin to Romance: the historical background With the expansion of Roman political and military domination ...

Author: Adam Ledgeway

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199584370

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 434

View: 655

This book examines grammatical changes during the transition from Latin to the Romance languages and the factors proposed to explain them. It challenges orthodoxy, presents new perspectives on language change, structure, and variation, and will appeal equally to Romance linguists, Latinists, philologists, and historical linguists of all persuasions.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Romance Languages

Romance Languages

This book describes the changes which led from colloquial Latin to the five major Romance languages: Spanish, French, Italian, Portuguese, and Romanian.

Author: Ti Alkire

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521889155

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 377

View: 766

Describes the changes which led from colloquial Latin to the five major Romance languages: Spanish, French, Italian, Portuguese, and Romanian.
Categories: Foreign Language Study

Latin Alive

Latin Alive

In Latin Alive, Joseph Solodow tells the story of how Latin developed into modern French, Spanish, and Italian, and deeply affected English as well.

Author: Joseph B. Solodow

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139484718

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page:

View: 446

In Latin Alive, Joseph Solodow tells the story of how Latin developed into modern French, Spanish, and Italian, and deeply affected English as well. Offering a gripping narrative of language change, Solodow charts Latin's course from classical times to the modern era, with focus on the first millennium of the Common Era. Though the Romance languages evolved directly from Latin, Solodow shows how every important feature of Latin's evolution is also reflected in English. His story includes scores of intriguing etymologies, along with many concrete examples of texts, studies, scholars, anecdotes, and historical events; observations on language; and more. Written with crystalline clarity, this book tells the story of the Romance languages for the general reader and to illustrate so amply Latin's many-sided survival in English as well.
Categories: Foreign Language Study

Romance Did Not Begin in Rome

Romance Did Not Begin in Rome

This work presents some new research hypotheses, which show that Romance languages share a high percentage of phonetic, lexical, morphosyntactic and semantic characteristics, showing a close kinship to a linguistic typology that relates ...

Author: Carme Huertas

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1984030213

Category:

Page: 160

View: 721

For many years, we have been taught that Romance languages come from Latin. Historical grammar has described this process on the basis of a complicated theoretical framework of successive changes that caused a deep transformation of the parent tongue, which degenerated into the so-called Vulgar Latin. However, as shown in recent research, on a morphosyntactic structure level, linguistic change is a very slow process. Some of the internal changes of a language do not occur over centuries but rather could be traced back over millenia. Why does historical grammar attribute to external influences the evolutionary process from Classical to Vulgar Latin and disregard the fact that it could be caused by the substrate language or languages? Some features of those languages would have survived the Romanization and point to an older common ancestor, an agglutinative and compositional language shared by the various Mediterranean peoples and from which the so-called Romance languages would stem. This work presents some new research hypotheses, which show that Romance languages share a high percentage of phonetic, lexical, morphosyntactic and semantic characteristics, showing a close kinship to a linguistic typology that relates them to each other but distances them from Latin. It is focused on Spanish although some examples are included in different Romances, such as the Romanian language which retains some aspects that help us to get closer to this common parent tongue. How can it be that the Romanian language has survived isolated so many tough, non-Romance invasions? The structural, lexical, phonetic and conceptual similarities between Romanian and the rest of Western Romance languages -distant languages whose people have not been in direct contact for at least two thousand years- suggests an earlier common language which must be much older than Latin. Therefore, the characteristics of the Romance languages might have evolved directly from this common, previous language, without having to justify this development through Latin. The relationship between Romance languages and Latin would then be of kinship and not filiation. The evidence is increasingly conclusive: Romance languages do not originate in Latin. Foreword by Cristina Brescan.
Categories:

The Grammar of Romance

The Grammar of Romance

This original guide introduces you to the basic grammar of Vulgar Latin and the Romance languages.

Author: Joshua Rudder

Publisher:

ISBN: 1475246633

Category: Romance languages

Page: 268

View: 953

This original guide introduces you to the basic grammar of Vulgar Latin and the Romance languages. Compare related languages to understand how nouns, verbs, pronouns, adjectives, words, phrases and sentences work throughout this language family. Challenge yourself to see commonalities among a range of Romance languages and to understand their shared history from Vulgar Latin. View examples from major Romance languages like Portuguese, French and Romanian, as well as many regional languages like Catalan, Sardinian and Romansh.Clear formatting and a thorough index allow you to identify key terms and quickly cross-reference relevant sections for more information. Romance examples are printed in bold, translations in italics and key grammar terms tackled elsewhere in the book are underlined.Extra materials include comparative grammar tables with notes, a brief tour of Vulgar Latin grammar, a chapter on the pronunciation of Romance, helpful maps and a glossary of language names. Balanced explanations and examples, a thorough index and a clear table of contents make this the ideal reference guide for students and enthusiasts of the Romance languages, Vulgar Latin/Proto-Romance or Romance linguistics.
Categories: Romance languages

Vulgar Latin

Vulgar Latin

This text is an invaluable aid to research and understanding for all those interested in Latin, Romance languages, historical linguistics, early medieval texts, and early medieval history.József Herman is the former director of the ...

Author: József Herman

Publisher: Penn State University Press

ISBN: 0271020008

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 130

View: 368

&"Vulgar Latin&" refers to those features of Latin language that were not recommended by the classical grammarians but existed nonetheless. Although &"Vulgar Latin&" is not well documented, evidence can be deduced from details of the spelling, grammar, and vocabulary that occur in texts of the later Roman Empire, late antiquity, and the early Middle Ages. Every aspect of &"Vulgar Latin&" is exemplified in this book, proving that the language is not separate in itself, but an integral part of Latin. Originally published in French in 1967, Vulgar Latin was translated more recently into Spanish in an expanded and revised version. The English translation by Roger Wright accurately portrays &"Vulgar Latin&" as a complicated field of study, where little is known with absolute certainty, but a great deal can be worked out with considerable probability through careful critical analysis of the data. This text is an invaluable aid to research and understanding for all those interested in Latin, Romance languages, historical linguistics, early medieval texts, and early medieval history.
Categories: Foreign Language Study

The Cambridge History of the Romance Languages Volume 2 Contexts

The Cambridge History of the Romance Languages  Volume 2  Contexts

A perfect complement to the first volume, it offers an external history of the Romance languages combining data and theory to produce new and revealing perspectives on the shaping of the Romance languages.

Author: Martin Maiden

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781316025550

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page:

View: 660

What is the origin of the Romance languages and how did they evolve? When and how did they become different from Latin, and from each other? Volume 2 of The Cambridge History of the Romance Languages offers fresh and original reflections on the principal questions and issues in the comparative external histories of the Romance languages. It is organised around the two key themes of influences and institutions, exploring the fundamental influence, of contact with and borrowing from, other languages (including Latin), and the cultural and institutional forces at work in the establishment of standard languages and norms of correctness. A perfect complement to the first volume, it offers an external history of the Romance languages combining data and theory to produce new and revealing perspectives on the shaping of the Romance languages.
Categories: Foreign Language Study