The integration of new immigrants in Taiwan An interview based analysis

The integration of new immigrants in Taiwan  An interview based analysis

Seminar paper from the year 2020 in the subject Social Work, grade: 2.0, University of Applied Sciences at Schweinfurt (Faculty of Applied Social Sciences: International Social Work with Refugees and Migrants (M.

Author: Cheng-Hsiang Hsueh

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 9783346442871

Category: Education

Page: 89

View: 872

Seminar paper from the year 2020 in the subject Social Work, grade: 2.0, University of Applied Sciences at Schweinfurt (Faculty of Applied Social Sciences: International Social Work with Refugees and Migrants (M. A.)), language: English, abstract: This research uses the Ethnography method to analyse the integration of the so called “mail order brides” based on interviews held with eight different Southeast Asian women. These women were four Vietnamese, one Chinese, one Malaysian, one Indonesian, and one woman from Myanmar who had lived in Taiwan for more than 20 years. The interviews about their experiences were conducted in their working place or at home. Furthermore, this research includes an observation conducted during the interview placing attention on how they react to the Taiwanese society. The observation and information from the interviews were summarized in a research diary which also included a self-reflection of the researcher. A focus is put on the marriage life of the New Inhabitant woman and their integration into the Taiwanese society. From the 1960s until the 1990s, Taiwan’s government did not have extensive laws in place to protect these migrants. Private agencies abused this opportunity to profit excessively, without thinking of how the new life in Taiwan would be like for the “mail-order brides”. In the beginning of the 1990s, the Taiwanese government started to put some policies into effect to tackle and limit this new phenomenon. The Taiwanese policy changed again in 2004 when the Deputy Minister of the Ministry of Education publicly denounced these transnational marriages as troublesome and urged the “foreign brides” to control their fertility, as their children’s poor educational level would deteriorate the education level of the Taiwanese population.
Categories: Education

The Taiwan Experience

The Taiwan Experience

I have mentioned elsewhere that the book can serve as a reference for how the world's final few remaining one-party states will democratise. As this book is a narration of my personal experiences, this may not be obvious at first.

Author: Alix Lee

Publisher:

ISBN: 1790509203

Category:

Page: 167

View: 814

This book is the first of three covering Taiwan's gradual evolution over several decades from a one-party dictatorship to a vibrant multi-party democracy. It deals with the social as well as political changes that have taken place in Taiwan, as seen from the point of view of a foreigner and a Taiwan citizen. It covers both social and political changes, and provides insight into present-day political circumstances as well as many other aspects of life in Taiwan.A foreigner and a Taiwan citizen? Two people? No, just one. I arrived in Taiwan on a British passport in 1986 and swapped my British nationality for Taiwan (ROC) nationality about 10 years ago.The book first gives the history of Taiwan to provide the background necessary to understand the complex present-day circumstances of this island. Then, the political circumstances and developments from 1986 to 1992 are narrated in Part Two from the point of view of an initially rather reluctant observer. Part Three focuses more on social change during this same time period. These years represent Taiwan's initial opening up from a society that had been under martial law for nearly four decades, the longest period any country in the world had suffered martial law at the time. Book Two will cover the years from 1992 to 2003, and draw comparisons with other countries in the region, particularly the other three of the four 'Asian Tigers'; South Korea, Hong Kong, and Singapore. At the time of this writing, Taiwan is going to the polls in the 2018 so-called 'nine-in-one' local elections. Apart from the elections themselves, there are 10 referendums. Even I will cast a vote shortly, for the first time in my life. Public participation in the administration of Taiwan has reached unprecedented levels. But it hasn't always been this way...
Categories:

Taiwan A to Z

Taiwan A to Z

"Taiwan A to Z provides the essential information you need to know before you go to Taiwan. Whether you're planning to be there a week or three years, this book is a must-read for any foreigner to Taiwan who wants to be successful there.

Author: Amy C. Liu

Publisher: Amy C Liu

ISBN: 9579784760

Category: Popular culture

Page: 182

View: 173

Categories: Popular culture

Taiwan s Pinyin Problem How a Lack of Standardized Spelling Affects Culture and Identity

Taiwan s Pinyin Problem  How a Lack of Standardized Spelling Affects Culture and Identity

The unsystematized transliterations found in Taiwan have the opposite effect, pushingthe Taiwanese toward foreign norms and pushing foreigners away from Chinese language and cultural norms. Confusion results from contradictory signage, ...

Author: Michael Riches

Publisher: C. Michael Riches

ISBN: 9789574369072

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 145

View: 723

A number of systems for alphabetizing Mandarin Chinese have been developed in the past two centuries. Conflictingly, Taiwan uses all of them and none of them. Foreigners who get their first exposure to Chinese in Taiwan are frequently led to severe mispronunciations of names and places, while street names change spelling from block to block. Unlike the mainland Chinese — who use an efficient, standardized system called Hanyu Pinyin — there is a reluctance among the Taiwanese to share their Chinese names with foreigners, and that they have institutionalized mispronunciations of their own cities, such as Taipei, Taichung, and Kaohsiung. They have no spelling system to share with foreigners to guide them to correct articulation of Mandarin words. This subtly segregates the Taiwanese into a linguistic bubble where Chinese language conventions become harder to share with foreigners, and where foreigners’ misperceptions integrate into the source culture. This comprehensive study shows that Hanyu Pinyin doesn’t just aid foreigners, but also preserves Chinese cultural characteristics when issues of identity are at play in a globalized context. Marshall McLuhan’s media theory and Lev Vygotsky’s sociocultural theory are used as a framework to show how alphabetic transcription affects cultural perceptions.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Taiwan and International Human Rights

Taiwan and International Human Rights

This book tells a story of Taiwan’s transformation from an authoritarian regime to a democratic system where human rights are protected as required by international human rights treaties.

Author: Jerome A. Cohen

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9789811303500

Category: Law

Page: 706

View: 992

This book tells a story of Taiwan’s transformation from an authoritarian regime to a democratic system where human rights are protected as required by international human rights treaties. There were difficult times for human rights protection during the martial law era; however, there has also been remarkable transformation progress in human rights protection thereafter. The book reflects the transformation in Taiwan and elaborates whether or not it is facilitated or hampered by its Confucian tradition. There are a number of institutional arrangements, including the Constitutional Court, the Control Yuan, and the yet-to-be-created National Human Rights Commission, which could play or have already played certain key roles in human rights protections. Taiwan’s voluntarily acceptance of human rights treaties through its implementation legislation and through the Constitutional Court’s introduction of such treaties into its constitutional interpretation are also fully expounded in the book. Taiwan’s NGOs are very active and have played critical roles in enhancing human rights practices. In the areas of civil and political rights, difficult human rights issues concerning the death penalty remain unresolved. But regarding the rights and freedoms in the spheres of personal liberty, expression, privacy, and fair trial (including lay participation in criminal trials), there are in-depth discussions on the respective developments in Taiwan that readers will find interesting. In the areas of economic, social, and cultural rights, the focuses of the book are on the achievements as well as the problems in the realization of the rights to health, a clean environment, adequate housing, and food. The protections of vulnerable groups, including indigenous people, women, LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) individuals, the disabled, and foreigners in Taiwan, are also the areas where Taiwan has made recognizable achievements, but still encounters problems. The comprehensive coverage of this book should be able to give readers a well-rounded picture of Taiwan’s human rights performance. Readers will find appealing the story of the effort to achieve high standards of human rights protection in a jurisdiction barred from joining international human rights conventions. This book won the American Society of International Law 2021 Certificate of Merit in a Specialized Area of International Law.
Categories: Law

Exceptional States

Exceptional States

After reading this book, no one can ever think that marriage is just a private, domestic matter."—Nicole Constable, author of Born Out of Place: Migrant Mothers and the Politics of International Labor "Exceptional States offers a fresh ...

Author: Sara L. Friedman

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520286221

Category: Social Science

Page: 262

View: 719

"Between 10% and 20% of marriages in Taiwan involve the union of a Taiwanese national with a Chinese immigrant, with as many as 13,000 cross-Strait couples registering new unions each year. Exceptional States examines new configurations of marriage, immigration, and governance emerging in an increasingly mobile Asia where Cold War legacies continue to shape contemporary political struggles over sovereignty and citizenship. This book poignantly and respectfully documents the struggle of these immigrant Chinese women as they seek belonging, acceptance, and recognition in their new land. The women's experiences parallel Taiwan's own desire to receive recognition from the international community as a sovereign nation-state. By tracing these political parallels, the book shows how Chinese marital immigrants are affected by Taiwan's own uncertain political status in relation to China in ways that marital immigrants from other Asian countries are not. Exceptional States illustrates the social, political and subjective consequences of immigrants who are living with this exceptional status. The book concludes with a discussion of how Chinese spouses' efforts to create a sense of belonging for themselves across the fluid waters of the Taiwan Strait offer possible insights into solving Taiwan's current sovereignty challenges"--Provided by publisher.
Categories: Social Science

Made by Taiwan

Made by Taiwan

Under current regulations and laws, foreigners can only be employed in Taiwan for a period of two to three years. Because of this, foreign companies are discouraged from developing in Taiwan on a large scale or for an extended period of ...

Author: Po-Lung Yu

Publisher: World Scientific

ISBN: 9789810247799

Category: Social Science

Page: 406

View: 590

Many nations and states have tried to build successful technological industries, but failed. Taiwan is an exception. Indeed, it is the third-largest production center for integrated circuits and personal computers. How has Taiwan made it, and how to do business successfully with Taiwan? This book aims to provide answers to those questions and to share the successful experience of Taiwan with others. If Taiwan could make it, then other nations, by learning from its experiences and patterns of development, can also make it, or even excel Taiwan. The book presents historical and analytical views covering most aspects of Taiwan's development patterns, including innovations of management and technology, production and business infrastructures, capital and human resources, education and government policies, and competitive characteristics of people and cultures.
Categories: Social Science

Chinatown No More

Chinatown No More

By focusing on the social and cultural life of post-1965 Taiwan immigrants in Queens, New York, this book shifts Chinese American studies from ethnic enclaves to the diverse multiethnic neighborhoods of Flushing and Elmhurst.

Author: Hsiang-Shui Chen

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015025390751

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 877

By focusing on the social and cultural life of post-1965 Taiwan immigrants in Queens, New York, this book shifts Chinese American studies from ethnic enclaves to the diverse multiethnic neighborhoods of Flushing and Elmhurst. As Hsiang-shui Chen documents, the political dynamics of these settlements are entirely different from the traditional closed Chinese communities; the immigrants in Queens think of themselves as living in "worldtown," not in a second Chinatown. Drawing on interviews with members of a hundred households, Chen brings out telling aspects of demography, immigration experience, family life, and gender roles, and then turns to vivid, humanistic portraits of three families. Chen also describes the organizational life of the Chinese in Queens with a lively account of the power struggles and social interactions that occur within religious, sports, social service, and business groups and with the outside world.
Categories: Social Science