Food Politics

How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health

Author: Marion Nestle

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520955064

Category: Cooking

Page: 534

View: 5295

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We all witness, in advertising and on supermarket shelves, the fierce competition for our food dollars. In this engrossing exposé, Marion Nestle goes behind the scenes to reveal how the competition really works and how it affects our health. The abundance of food in the United States--enough calories to meet the needs of every man, woman, and child twice over--has a downside. Our over-efficient food industry must do everything possible to persuade people to eat more--more food, more often, and in larger portions--no matter what it does to waistlines or well-being. Like manufacturing cigarettes or building weapons, making food is big business. Food companies in 2000 generated nearly $900 billion in sales. They have stakeholders to please, shareholders to satisfy, and government regulations to deal with. It is nevertheless shocking to learn precisely how food companies lobby officials, co-opt experts, and expand sales by marketing to children, members of minority groups, and people in developing countries. We learn that the food industry plays politics as well as or better than other industries, not least because so much of its activity takes place outside the public view. Editor of the 1988 Surgeon General's Report on Nutrition and Health, Nestle is uniquely qualified to lead us through the maze of food industry interests and influences. She vividly illustrates food politics in action: watered-down government dietary advice, schools pushing soft drinks, diet supplements promoted as if they were First Amendment rights. When it comes to the mass production and consumption of food, strategic decisions are driven by economics--not science, not common sense, and certainly not health. No wonder most of us are thoroughly confused about what to eat to stay healthy. An accessible and balanced account, Food Politics will forever change the way we respond to food industry marketing practices. By explaining how much the food industry influences government nutrition policies and how cleverly it links its interests to those of nutrition experts, this path-breaking book helps us understand more clearly than ever before what we eat and why.
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Shortchanging America's Health

A State-by-State Look at How Federal Public Health Dollars are Spent and Key State Health Facts

Author: Jeffrey Levi

Publisher: DIANE Publishing

ISBN: 9781437915952

Category:

Page: 140

View: 3635

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The nation¿s public health system is responsible for improving the health of Americans. However, the public health system has been chronically underfunded in the U.S. This report examines how much the federal government spends to try to keep the country well. A state-by-state review of FY 2008 spending reveals that federal funding (through the CDC) for public health varies, often significantly, with a per capital low of $12.74 to a per capita of $52.78. The national average is $17.60 per person, a fraction of what is spent on health care costs. The report also examines state funding for public health. Extensive statistical information.
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Safe Food

The Politics of Food Safety

Author: Marion Nestle

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520266064

Category: Cooking

Page: 379

View: 1616

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Previous edition published in : 2003.
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Media and Food Industries

The New Politics of Food

Author: Michelle Phillipov

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319641018

Category: Social Science

Page: 259

View: 1010

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This volume is the first to combine textual analysis of food media texts with interviews with media production staff, reality TV contestants, celebrity chefs, and food producers and retailers across the artisan-conventional spectrum. Intensified media interest in food has seen food politics become a dominant feature of popular media—from television and social media to cookbooks and advertising. This is often thought to be driven by consumers and by new ethics of consumption, but Media and Food Industries reveals how contemporary food politics is also being shaped by political and economic imperatives within the media and food industries. It explores the behind-the-scenes production dynamics of contemporary food media to assess the roles of—and relationships between—media and food industries in shaping new concerns and meanings with respect to food.
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Food and Culture in Contemporary American Fiction

Author: Lorna Piatti-Farnell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136645543

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 202

View: 6299

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Establishing an interdisciplinary connection between Food Studies and American literary scholarship, Piatti-Farnell investigates the significances of food and eating in American fiction, from 1980 to the present day. She argues that culturally-coded representations of the culinary illuminate contemporary American anxieties about class gender, race, tradition, immigration, nationhood, and history. As she offers a critical analysis of major works of contemporary fiction, Piatti-Farnell unveils contrasting modes of culinary nostalgia, disillusionment, and progress that pervasively address the cultural disintegration of local and familiar culinary values, in favor of globalized economies of consumption. In identifying different incarnations of the "American culinary," Piatti-Farnell covers the depiction of food in specific categories of American fiction and explores how the cultural separation that molds food preferences inevitably challenges the existence of a homogenous American identity. The study treads on new grounds since it not only provides the first comprehensive study of food and consumption in contemporary American fiction, but also aims to expose interrelated politics of consumption in a variety of authors from different ethnic, cultural, racial and social backgrounds within the United States.
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Global obligations for the right to food

Author: George Kent

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Pub Inc

ISBN: 9780742560628

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 258

View: 354

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A child may be born into a poor country, but not a poor world. If global human rights are to be meaningful, they must be universal. Global Obligations for the Right to Food assesses the nature and depth of the global responsibility to provide adequate food to the world's population. While governments have a primary responsibility for assuring the right to food for people under national jurisdictions, we as a global community are all responsible. Global Obligations for the Right to Food explores the various actions that should be taken by governments, non-governmental organizations, and individuals to ensure that citizens of the world have access to adequate food.
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Inventing Baby Food

Taste, Health, and the Industrialization of the American Diet

Author: Amy Bentley

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520959140

Category: Cooking

Page: 256

View: 5573

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Food consumption is a significant and complex social activity—and what a society chooses to feed its children reveals much about its tastes and ideas regarding health. In this groundbreaking historical work, Amy Bentley explores how the invention of commercial baby food shaped American notions of infancy and influenced the evolution of parental and pediatric care. Until the late nineteenth century, infants were almost exclusively fed breast milk. But over the course of a few short decades, Americans began feeding their babies formula and solid foods, frequently as early as a few weeks after birth. By the 1950s, commercial baby food had become emblematic of all things modern in postwar America. Little jars of baby food were thought to resolve a multitude of problems in the domestic sphere: they reduced parental anxieties about nutrition and health; they made caretakers feel empowered; and they offered women entering the workforce an irresistible convenience. But these baby food products laden with sugar, salt, and starch also became a gateway to the industrialized diet that blossomed during this period. Today, baby food continues to be shaped by medical, commercial, and parenting trends. Baby food producers now contend with health and nutrition problems as well as the rise of alternative food movements. All of this matters because, as the author suggests, it’s during infancy that American palates become acclimated to tastes and textures, including those of highly processed, minimally nutritious, and calorie-dense industrial food products.
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Food, Medicine, and the Quest for Good Health

Nutrition, Medicine, and Culture

Author: Nancy N. Chen

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231508913

Category: Cooking

Page: 144

View: 3539

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What we eat, how we eat, where we eat, and when we eat are deeply embedded cultural practices. Eating is also related to how we medicate. The multimillion-dollar diet industry offers advice on how to eat for a better body and longer life, and avoiding harmful foods (or choosing healthy ones) is considered separate from consuming medicine another multimillion-dollar industry. In contrast, most traditional medical systems view food as inseparable from medicine and regard medicinal foods as the front line of healing. Drawing on medical texts and food therapy practices from around the world and throughout history, Nancy N. Chen locates old and new crossovers between food and medicine in different social and cultural contexts. The consumption of spices, sugar, and salt was once linked to specific healing properties, and trade in these commodities transformed not just the political economy of Europe, Asia, and the New World but local tastes and food practices as well. Today's technologies are rapidly changing traditional attitudes toward food, enabling the cultivation of new admixtures, such as nutraceuticals and genetically modified food, that link food to medicine in novel ways. Chen considers these developments against the evolving food regimes of the diet industry in order to build a framework for understanding diet as individual practice, social prescription, and political formation.
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Cultural Studies and Environment, Revisited

Author: Phaedra. C Pezzullo

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317982576

Category: Social Science

Page: 162

View: 528

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The environment is perhaps most misunderstood as a static place, somewhere "out there," separated from the practices of our everyday lives. Given this assumption, environmental movements and concerns have remained mostly marginalized or denigrated in cultural studies publications, conferences, and presentations. Recent global developments have made changing this oversight and, at times, direct resistance to engaging environmental concerns a new priority. This edited collection illustrates an appreciation of the dynamic, palpable, and significant ways the environment permeates culture (and vice versa), as well as a collective commitment to the ways that cultural studies has more to offer—and to learn from—taking environmental matters to heart. Like foundational categories of identity, economics, and historical context, this collection reminds us why the environment is and should be considered relevant to any work done in the name of "cultural studies." Including research from four continents and across media, the authors offer insights on timely topics such as food, tourism, human/animal relations, forests, queer theory, indigenous rights, and water. This book was published as a special issue of Cultural Studies.
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