Finding Time for the Old Stone Age

A History of Palaeolithic Archaeology and Quaternary Geology in Britain, 1860-1960

Author: Anne O'Connor

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0199215472

Category: History

Page: 423

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This study looks at the fascinating attempts from the Victorian era to the middle of the 20th century to reconstruct Britain's prehistoric past, to provide a chronology for stone tools and to relate these finds to geological sequences. The debates around this subject were often amazingly fiery and although a serious scholarly study this book is also great fun, with a host of colourful characters.
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The British Palaeolithic

Hominin Societies at the Edge of the Pleistocene World

Author: Paul Pettitt,Mark White

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0415674549

Category: Social Science

Page: 592

View: 4489

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The British Palaeolithic provides the first academic synthesis of the entire British Palaeolithic, from the earliest occupation (currently understood to be around 980,000 years ago) to the end of the Ice Age. Landscape and ecology form the canvas for an explicitly interpretative approach aimed at understanding the how different hominin societies addressed the issues of life at the edge of the Pleistocene world. Commencing with a consideration of the earliest hominin settlement of Europe, the book goes on to examine the behavioural, cultural and adaptive repertoires of the first human occupants of Britain from an ecological perspective. These themes flow throughout the book as it explores subsequent occupational pulses across more than half a million years of Pleistocene prehistory, which saw Homo heidelbergensis, the Neanderthals and ultimately Homo sapiens walk these shores. The British Palaeolithic fills a major gap in teaching resources as well as in research by providing a current synthesis of the latest research on the period. This book represents the culmination of 40 years combined research in this area by two well known experts in the field, and is an important new text for students of British archaeology as well as for students and researchers of the continental Palaeolithic period.
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Natural History Societies and Civic Culture in Victorian Scotland

Author: Diarmid A Finnegan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317315731

Category: History

Page: 272

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The relationship between science and civil society is essential to our understanding of cultural change during the Victorian era. Finnegan's study looks at the shifting nature of this process during the nineteenth century, using Scotland as the focus for his argument.
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The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Death and Burial

Author: Sarah Tarlow,Liv Nilsson Stutz

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191650390

Category: Social Science

Page: 872

View: 9201

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The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Death and Burial reviews the current state of mortuary archaeology and its practice, highlighting its often contentious place in the modern socio-politics of archaeology. It contains forty-four chapters which focus on the history of the discipline and its current scientific techniques and methods. Written by leading, international scholars in the field, it derives its examples and case studies from a wide range of time periods, such as the middle palaeolithic to the twentieth century, and geographical areas which include Europe, North and South America, Africa, and Asia. Combining up-to-date knowledge of relevant archaeological research with critical assessments of the theme and an evaluation of future research trajectories, it draws attention to the social, symbolic, and theoretical aspects of interpreting mortuary archaeology. The volume is well-illustrated with maps, plans, photographs, and illustrations and is ideally suited for students and researchers.
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Stone Tools and the Evolution of Human Cognition

Author: April Nowell,Iain Davidson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 234

View: 4451

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Stone tools are the most durable and common type of archaeological remain and one of the most important sources of information about behaviors of early hominins. Stone Tools and the Evolution of Human Cognition develops methods for examining questions of cognition, demonstrating the progression of mental capabilities from early hominins to modern humans through the archaeological record. Dating as far back as 2.5-2.7 million years ago, stone tools were used in cutting up animals, woodworking, and preparing vegetable matter. Today, lithic remains give archaeologists insight into the forethought, planning, and enhanced working memory of our early ancestors. Contributors focus on multiple ways in which archaeologists can investigate the relationship between tools and the evolving human mind--including joint attention, pattern recognition, memory usage, and the emergence of language. Offering a wide range of approaches and diversity of place and time, the chapters address issues such as skill, social learning, technique, language, and cognition based on lithic technology. Stone Tools and the Evolution of Human Cognition will be of interest to Paleolithic archaeologists and paleoanthropologists interested in stone tool technology and cognitive evolution.
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Dwelling Among the Monuments

The Neolithic Village of Barnhouse, Maeshowe Passage Grave and Surrounding Monuments at Stenness, Orkney

Author: Colin Richards

Publisher: McDonald Inst of Archeological

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 397

View: 2255

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This volume provides an account of the lives of the inhabitants of the village of Barnhouse, a late Neolithic settlement complex in Orkney. The excavation of Barnhouse between 1986 and 1993 constitutes the largest investigation of a Neolithic settlement in northern Britain since the 1920s. It consequently provides an ideal opportunity to reconsider architectural representation, the social construction of identity, and social and ritual practices within a late Neolithic community. The inhabitants of Barnhouse lived within one of the most spectacular monumental landscapes of the British Neolithic, and this volume also describes smaller-scale excavations at the nearby passage grave of Maeshowe and at the Stone of Odin. The results of these investigations provide the basis for an interpretative account of the habitation and construction of this monumental landscape over a 500-year period of Orcadian prehistory (c.3200-2700 BC).
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