Enoch and the Growth of an Apocalyptic Tradition

Enoch and the Growth of an Apocalyptic Tradition

VanderKam carries further an investigation of the relation between wisdom and apocalypse.

Author: James C. VanderKam

Publisher: Catholic Biblical Assn of Amer

ISBN: STANFORD:36105037662975

Category: Religion

Page: 217

View: 670

VanderKam carries further an investigation of the relation between wisdom and apocalypse. He shows that not simply wisdom, but mantic wisdom has informed the authors of 1 Enoch 1-36, 73-107. VanderKam affirms the basic correctness of each researcher but sees in their work shortcomings which his own study seeks to rectify.
Categories: Religion

The Apocalyptic Imagination

The Apocalyptic Imagination

For the following , compare VanderKam , Enoch and the Growth of an Apocalyptic Tradition , 33-51 ; idem , Enoch : A Man for All Generations ( Columbia , SC : University of South Carolina Press , 1995 ) 6-8 ; P. Grelot , “ La légende ...

Author: John Joseph Collins

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN: 0802843719

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 337

View: 803

The Apocalyptic Imagination by John Collins is one of the most widely praised studies of Jewish apocalyptic literature ever written. This second edition represents a complete rewriting and a new chapter on the Dead Sea Scrolls.h
Categories: Literary Criticism

Ultimate Things

Ultimate Things

Cf. James C. Vanderkam , Enoch : A Man for All Generations ( Studies on Personalities of the Old Testament ; Columbia : University of South Carolina Press , 1995 ) ; VanderKam , Enoch and the Growth of an Apocalyptic Tradition ( CBQMS ...

Author: Greg Carey

Publisher: Chalice Press

ISBN: 0827238185

Category: Religion

Page: 304

View: 503

Carey presents an introduction to the elements of apocalyptic discourse in the Hebrew Bible, the intertestamental texts of the Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha, and the Jewish and Christian apocalyptic texts. He seeks to help modern readers perplexed by the rampant and somewhat outrageous depiction and interpretation of apocalyptic literature to see apocalyptic discourse as a flexible set of resources that early Jews and Christians could employ for a variety of persuasive tasks. Carey examines each of the literary works that exhibit apocalyptic discourse. He briefly introduces the date and language of each text and shows its basic contents. Then he examines the particular topics and purposes of the work. Carey concludes by showing a way to read the particular example of apocalyptic discourse as a whole in its own setting with its own purposes. Carey invokes discourse as a category of study in an attempt to bring together the literary, ideological, and social dimensions of apocalyptic language. He sees the genius of apocalyptic discourse in its ability to bring its audience into otherwise inaccessible mysteries concerning the future and the heavenly realms. As theology, apocalyptic discourse engages life's greatest questions-the nature of God, the desire for justice, and the frustrations of human finitude. As poetry, it expresses the theological imagination in vivid symbols and conventional literary forms.
Categories: Religion

The Apocalyptic Imagination

The Apocalyptic Imagination

So NRSV, but see VanderKam, who argues that ʾelohîm (“God”) should be translated “angels” (Enoch and the Growth of an Apocalyptic Tradition, 31). Compare Dimant, “Biography of Enoch,” 21. 10. For the following, compare VanderKam, ...

Author: John J. Collins

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN: 9781467445177

Category: Religion

Page: 424

View: 497

One of the most widely praised studies of Jewish apocalyptic literature ever written, The Apocalyptic Imagination by John J. Collins has served for over thirty years as a helpful, relevant, comprehensive survey of the apocalyptic literary genre. After an initial overview of things apocalyptic, Collins proceeds to deal with individual apocalyptic texts — the early Enoch literature, the book of Daniel, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and others — concluding with an examination of apocalypticism in early Christianity. Collins has updated this third edition throughout to account for the recent profusion of studies germane to ancient Jewish apocalypticism, and he has also substantially revised and updated the bibliography.
Categories: Religion

The Tension Between God as Righteous Judge and as Merciful in Early Judaism

The Tension Between God as Righteous Judge and as Merciful in Early Judaism

VanderKam , Enoch and the Growth of an Apocalyptic Tradition , 135–36 . 134. See I. Fröhlich , “ The Symbolic Language of the Animal Apocalypse of Enoch ( 1 Enoch 85-90 ) , " RevQ 14 ( 1989 ) 629–36 . 135. Milik , The Books of Enoch ...

Author: Barry D. Smith

Publisher: University Press of America

ISBN: 076183088X

Category: Religion

Page: 385

View: 360

In recent years, the scholarly consensus has emerged that early Judaism should no longer be classified as a religion of legalistic works on righteousness, but rather defined primarily by God's covenant with Israel. In this work, it is argued, instead, that there is actually a tension in early Judaism between God as righteous judge and as merciful. As E. Sjöberg maintained in his Gott und Sünder im palästinischen Judentum, in the sources used for a reconstruction of early Judaism, there are two mutually exclusive ways in which God is said to relate to human beings. First, God as righteous judge deals with human beings as they deserve. They are assumed to be morally free and responsible, and God judges and recompenses them in history and eschatologically. Not only are the wicked punished for their sins, but the righteous are also rewarded for their obedience. And second, God as merciful does not deal with human beings as they deserve. Rather, he removes the guilt resulting from disobedience to the Law, sometimes on the simple condition of repentance. This means that a person can escape the consequences of disobedience. The understanding of God in the sources vacillates between God as righteous judge and God as merciful, without coming down definitively on one side to the exclusion of the other.
Categories: Religion

The Armenian Apocalyptic Tradition

The Armenian Apocalyptic Tradition

VanderKam, J.C. 1984. Enoch and the Growth of an Apocalyptic Tradition. CBQMS. Washington, D.C.: Catholic Biblical Association of America. ———. 1995. Enoch: A Man for All Generations. Columbia: University of South Carolina. ———. 1996.

Author: Kevork Bardakjian

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004270268

Category: BIBLES

Page: 818

View: 704

"The Armenian Apocalyptic Tradition: A Comparative Perspective" comprises an unprecedented collection of essays on apocalyptic literature in the Armenian tradition.
Categories: BIBLES

From Apocalypticism to Merkabah Mysticism

From Apocalypticism to Merkabah Mysticism

55 The traditions about Enoch are different in J and P. For the discussion of the differences, see J. VanderKam, Enoch and the Growth of an Apocalyptic Tradition (CBQMS, 16; Washington: The Catholic Biblical Association of America, ...

Author: Andrei A. Orlov

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004154391

Category: Religion

Page: 483

View: 234

This volume represents the first attempt to study Slavonic pseudepigrapha collectively as a unique group of texts that share common theophanic and mediatorial imagery crucial for the development of early Jewish mysticism.
Categories: Religion

The Origins of Jewish Mysticism

The Origins of Jewish Mysticism

2 See James C. VanderKam, Enoch and the Growth of an Apocalyptic Tradition (Washington, DC: Catholic Biblical Association of America, 1984), p. 114 (“a paleographically determined terminus ad quem of ca.

Author: Peter Schäfer

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691142159

Category: Religion

Page: 398

View: 572

The Origins of Jewish Mysticism offers the first in-depth look at the history of Jewish mysticism from the book of Ezekiel to the Merkavah mysticism of late antiquity. The Merkavah movement is widely recognized as the first full-fledged expression of Jewish mysticism, one that had important ramifications for classical rabbinic Judaism and the emergence of the Kabbalah in twelfth-century Europe. Yet until now, the origins and development of still earlier forms of Jewish mysticism have been largely overlooked. In this book, Peter Schäfer sheds new light on Ezekiel's tantalizing vision, the apocalyptic literature of Enoch, the Dead Sea Scrolls, the writings of the Hellenistic Jewish philosopher Philo, the rabbinical writings of the Talmudic period, and the esotericism of the Merkavah mystics. Schäfer questions whether we can accurately speak of Jewish mysticism as a uniform, coherent phenomenon with origins in Judaism's mythical past. Rather than imposing preconceived notions about "mysticism" on a great variety of writings that arose from different cultural, religious, and historical settings, he reveals what these writings seek to tell us about the age-old human desire to get close to and communicate with God.
Categories: Religion

Traditions of the Bible

Traditions of the Bible

... Grelot, "La legende d'Henoch"; VanderKam, Enoch and the Growth of an Apocalyptic Tradition; Himmelfarb, "A Report on Enoch in Rabbinic Literature," 262; and works cited below. Enoch the Heavenly Scribe: For most of the last century, ...

Author: James L. KUGEL

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674039766

Category: Religion

Page: 1078

View: 986

James Kugel's The Bible As It Was (1997) has been welcomed with universal praise. Here now is the full scholarly edition of this wonderfully rich and illuminating work, expanding the author's findings into an incomparable reference work. Focusing on two dozen core stories in the Pentateuch--from the Creation and Tree of Knowledge through the Exodus from Egypt and journey to the Promised Land--James Kugel shows us how the earliest interpreters of the scriptures radically transformed the Bible and made it into the book that has come down to us today. Kugel explains how and why the writers of this formative age of interpretation--roughly 200 B.C.E. to 150 C.E.--assumed such a significant role. Mining their writings--including the Dead Sea Scrolls, works of Philo and Josephus and letters of the Apostle Paul, and writings of the Apostolic Fathers and the rabbinic Sages--he quotes for us the seminal passages that uncover this crucial interpretive process. For this full-scale reference work Kugel has added a substantial treasury of sources and passages for each of the 24 Bible stories. It will serve as a unique guide and sourcebook for biblical interpretation.
Categories: Religion

Expectations of the End

Expectations of the End

1 Enoch 1 Enoch comprises various features, such as heavenly revelation, focus on final judgement, historical survey of generations, and otherworldly journey, which contributed to the growth of early Jewish apocalyptic tradition.40 ...

Author: Albert Hogeterp

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789047425090

Category: Religion

Page: 586

View: 204

This book provides a comparative traditio-historical study of the full range of Qumran texts and recensions now available and of New Testament texts with regard to ideas about the final age, resurrection, apocalypticism, and messianism.
Categories: Religion

Persepolis and Jerusalem

Persepolis and Jerusalem

A strict delineation between prophetic and sapiential traditions is both misleading and unnecessary—it was most likely ... In particular, VanderKam, Enoch and the Growth of an Apocalyptic Tradition, and Collins, Seers, Sybils [sic] and ...

Author: Jason M. Silverman

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9780567205513

Category: Religion

Page: 320

View: 391

A renewed study of Iranian influence on apocalyptic traditions, arguing for a methodology which takes into account Iranian studies, oral theory, and the Achaemenid context.
Categories: Religion

Jewish Traditions in Early Christian Literature Volume 4 Jewish Apocalyptic Heritage in Early Christianity

Jewish Traditions in Early Christian Literature  Volume 4 Jewish Apocalyptic Heritage in Early Christianity

Paris 1952 VanderKam, J.C. The Book of Jubilees 1-2 (CSCO 510-11, Scr. aethiopici 87-88) Louvain 1989 – Enoch and the Growth of an Apocalyptic Tradition (CBQMS 16) Washington 1984 – Enoch — A Man for All Generations (Studies and ...

Author: William Adler

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004275171

Category: Religion

Page: 300

View: 737

The volume contains five chapters which investigate the early Christian appropriations of Jewish apocalyptic material. An introductory chapter surveys ancient perceptions of the apocalyses as well as their function, authority, and survival in the early Church. The second chapter focuses on a specific tradition by exploring the status of the Enoch-literature, the use of the fallen-angel motif, and the identification of Enoch as an eschatological witness. Christian transmission of Jewish texts, a topic whose significance is more and more being recognized, is the subject of chapter three which analyzes what happend to 4,5 and 6 Ezra as they were copied and edited in Christian circles. Chapter four studies the early Christian appropriation and reinterpretation of Jewish apocalyptic chronologies, especially Daniel's vision of 70 weeks. The fifth and last chapter is devoted to the use and influence of Jewish apocalyptic traditions among Christian sectarian groups in Asia Minor and particularly in Egypt. Taken together these chapters written by four authors, offer illuminating examples of how Jewish apocalyptic texts and traditions fared in early Christianity. Editors James C. VanderKam is lecturing at the University of Notre Dame; William Adler is lecturer at North Carolina State University. Series: Compendia Rerum Iudaicarum ad Novum Testamentum Section 1 - The Jewish people in the first century Historial geography, political history, social, cultural and religious life and institutions Edited by S. Safrai and M. Stern in cooperation with D. Flusser and W.C. van Unnik Section 2 - The Literature of the Jewish People in the Period of the Second Temple and the Talmud Section 3 - JewishTraditions in Early Christian Literature
Categories: Religion

Enoch and Qumran Origins

Enoch and Qumran Origins

James VanderKam began exploring the literary growth of the traditions associated with the patriarch Enoch well ... the contribution of 1 Enoch to the broader development of apocalypticism in the second temple period.10 In these last two ...

Author: Italy Enoch Seminar 2003 Venice

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN: 0802828787

Category: Religion

Page: 454

View: 312

The rediscovery of Enochic Judaism as an ancient movement of dissent within Second Temple Judaism, a movement centered on neither temple nor torah, is a major achievement of contemporary research. After being marginalized, ancient Enoch texts have reemerged as a significant component of the Dead Sea Scrolls library unearthed at Qumran. Enoch and Qumran Origins is the first comprehensive treatment of the complex and forgotten relations between the Qumran community and the Jewish group behind the pseudepigraphal literature of Enoch. The contributors demonstrate that the roots of the Qumran community are to be found in the tradition of the Enoch group rather than that of the Jerusalem priesthood. Framed by Gabriele Boccaccini's introduction and James Charlesworth's conclusion, this book examines the hypotheses of five particularly eminent scholars, resulting in an engaging and substantive discussion among forty-seven specialists from nine countries. The exceptional array of essays from leading international scholars in Second Temple Judaism and Christian origins makes Enoch and Qumran Origins a sine qua non for serious students of this period. Contributors: William Adler Matthias Albani Jeff S. Anderson Albert I. Baumgarten Andreas Bedenbender Stefan Beyerle Gabriele Boccaccini James H. Charlesworth John J. Collins Michael A. Daise James R. Davila Torleif Elgvin Mark A. Elliott Hanan Eshel Peter W. Flint Ida Fröhlich Florentino Garca Martnez Claudio Gianotto Lester L. Grabbe Ithamar Gruenwald Charlotte Hempel Matthias Henze Martha Himmelfarb Michael A. Knibb Klaus Koch Helge S. Kvanvig Armin Lange Erik W. Larson Timothy H. Lim Corrado Martone George W. E. Nickelsburg Pierluigi Piovanelli Émile Puech Annette Yoshiko Reed John C. Reeves Henry W. Morisada Rietz Paolo Sacchi Lawrence H. Schiffman Loren T. Stuckenbruck David W. Suter Shemaryahu Talmon Eibert J. C. Tigchelaar Patrick Tiller Liliana Rosso Ubigli James C. VanderKam Jacques van Ruiten Benjamin G. Wright III
Categories: Religion

Qumran origins and apocalypticism

Qumran origins and apocalypticism

I do not agree, however, that apocalypticism can be reduced to a single stream of tradition, or to a single socially continuous movement.”10 It is usually assumed that ... 11 VanderKam, Enoch and the Growth of an Apocalyptic Tradition.

Author: Florentino García Martínez

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004155695

Category: Religion

Page: 325

View: 480

The author's influential articles on the Origins of the Qumran Community (the co-called “Groningen Hypothesis”) and on Apocalypticism in the Dead Sea Scrolls are now collected in one volume, including translations of essays that were written in Spanish and French.
Categories: Religion

The Faces of Torah

The Faces of Torah

... this type of tour is to be associated with historical apocalypses rather than with the cosmic travels of Enoch. 58 VanderKam, Enoch and the Growth of an Apocalyptic Tradition, 23–51; Kvanvig, Roots of the Apocalyptic, 214–342.

Author: Christine Hayes

Publisher: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht

ISBN: 9783647552545

Category: Religion

Page: 660

View: 484

This volume is a festschrift in honor of Steven Fraade, the Mark Taper Professor of the History of Judaism at Yale University. The contributions to the volume, written by colleagues and former students of Professor Fraade, reflect many of his scholarly interests. The scholarly credentials of the contributors are exceedingly high. The volume is divided into three sections, one on Second Temple literature and its afterlife, a second on rabbinic literature and rabbinic history, and a third on prayer and the ancient synagogue.Contributors are Alan Applebaum, Joshua Burns , Elizabeth Shanks Alexander , Chaya Halberstam , John J. Collins, Marc Bregman, Aharon Shemesh, Ishay Rosen-Zvi, Vered Noam, Robert Brody, Albert Baumgarten, Marc Hirshman, Moshe Bar-Asher, Aaron Amit, Yose Yahalom, Lee Levine, Jan Joosten, Daniel Boyarin, Charlotte Hempel, David Stern, Beth Berkowitz, Azzan Yadin, Joshua Levinson, Elitzur Bar-Asher Siegal, Michal Bar-Asher Siegal, Tzvi Novick, Devora Diamant, Richard Kalmin, Carol Bakhos, Judith Hauptman, Jeff Rubenstein, Martha Himmelfarb, Stuart Miller, Esther Chazon, James Kugel, Chaim Milikowsky, Maren Niehoff, Peter Schaefer, and Adiel Schremer.
Categories: Religion

Apocalyptic Thinking in Early Judaism

Apocalyptic Thinking in Early Judaism

3 All translations of 1 Enoch follow G. W. E. Nickelsburg, 1 Enoch 1 (Hermenia; Minneapolis: Fortress, 2001). 4 J. C. VanderKam, Enoch and the Growth of an Apocalyptic Tradition (CBQMS 16; Washington: Catholic Biblical Association of ...

Author: Cecilia Wassen

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004358386

Category: Religion

Page: 236

View: 808

In Apocalyptic Thinking leading experts critically engage with John Collins’ seminal study The Apocalyptic Imagination and advance the debate on ancient Jewish apocalyptic with articles on current topics with a special focus on the Dead Sea Scrolls.
Categories: Religion

Qumran and Apocalyptic

Qumran and Apocalyptic

G.W.E. NICKELSBURG, The Apocalyptic Message of 1 Enoch 92-1052, CBQ 39 (1977), 309-328; “Riches, the Rich, ... J.C. VANDERKAM, Enoch and the Growth of an Apocalyptic Tradition, 146, reaches the same conclusion. editors, was eventually ...

Author: Florentino García Martínez

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004350106

Category: Religion

Page:

View: 474

A collection of detailed studies of some Aramaic texts from Qumran (Book of Noah, Books of Enoch, Book of Giants, Prayer of Nabonidus, Pseudo-Daniel Aramaic, 4Q246 and New Jerusalem) which provides new insights on the relationship of Qumran and the Apocalyptic Tradition.
Categories: Religion

Qumran and a Apocalyptic

Qumran and a Apocalyptic

124 G.W.E. NICKELSBURG , « The Apocalyptic Message of 1 Enoch 92-105 » , CBQ 39 ( 1977 ) , 309-328 ; « Riches , the Rich ... J.C. VANDERKAM , Enoch and the Growth of an Apocalyptic Tradition , 146 , reaches the same conclusion . editors ...

Author: Florentino García Martínez

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004095861

Category: Religion

Page: 233

View: 425

A collection of detailed studies of some Aramaic texts from Qumran ("Book of Noah, Books of Enoch, Book of Giants, Prayer of Nabonidus, Pseudo-Daniel Aramaic, 4Q246" and "New Jerusalem") which provides new insights on the relationship of Qumran and the Apocalyptic Tradition.
Categories: Religion

The Book of Daniel

The Book of Daniel

surrounding culture in terms which are compatible with pre - existing Jewish tradition . They were not framed ad hoc in the heat of a national ... For discussion , see VanderKam , Enoch and the Growth of an Apocalyptic Tradition , 128 .

Author: John Joseph Collins

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 0391041282

Category: Religion

Page: 482

View: 583

International experts offer fresh insights into: (1) Review of Scholarship and Context; (2) Near Eastern Milieu; (3) Interpretation of Specific Passages; (4) Social Setting; (5) Literary Context, Including Qumran; (6) Reception in Judaism and Christianity; (7) Textual History; and (8) Theology of Daniel.
Categories: Religion

A Guide to Early Jewish Texts and Traditions in Christian Transmission

A Guide to Early Jewish Texts and Traditions in Christian Transmission

García Martínez, F. “Contributions of the Aramaic Enoch Fragments to Our Understanding of the Books of Enoch.” Qumran and Apocalyptic: Studies on the ... VanderKam, J. C. Enoch and the Growth of an Apocalyptic Tradition. CBQMS 16.

Author: Gabriele Boccaccini

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190863098

Category: Bibles

Page: 640

View: 345

The Jewish culture of the Hellenistic and early Roman periods established a basis for all monotheistic religions, but its main sources have been preserved to a great degree through Christian transmission. This Guide is devoted to problems of preservation, reception, and transformation of Jewish texts and traditions of the Second Temple period in the many Christian milieus from the ancient world to the late medieval era. It approaches this corpus not as an artificial collection of reconstructed texts--a body of hypothetical originals--but rather from the perspective of the preserved materials, examined in their religious, social, and political contexts. It also considers the other, non-Christian, channels of the survival of early Jewish materials, including Rabbinic, Gnostic, Manichaean, and Islamic. This unique project brings together scholars from many different fields in order to map the trajectories of early Jewish texts and traditions among diverse later cultures. It also provides a comprehensive and comparative introduction to this new field of study while bridging the gap between scholars of early Judaism and of medieval Christianity.
Categories: Bibles