Enlightenment Contested

Enlightenment Contested

Continuing the story he began in the best-selling Radical Enlightenment , and now focusing his attention on the first half of the eighteenth century, he returns to the original sources to offer a groundbreaking new perspective on the nature ...

Author: Jonathan I. Israel

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191057489

Category: Philosophy

Page: 1024

View: 161

Jonathan Israel presents the first major reassessment of the Western Enlightenment for a generation. Continuing the story he began in the best-selling Radical Enlightenment , and now focusing his attention on the first half of the eighteenth century, he returns to the original sources to offer a groundbreaking new perspective on the nature and development of the most important currents in modern thought. Israel traces many of the core principles of Western modernity to their roots in the social, political, and philosophical ferment of this period: the primacy of reason, democracy, racial equality, feminism, religious toleration, sexual emancipation, and freedom of expression. He emphasizes the dual character of the Enlightenment, and the bitter struggle between on the one hand a generally dominant, anti-democratic mainstream, supporting the monarchy, aristocracy, and ecclesiastical authority, and on the other a largely repressed democratic, republican, and 'materialist' radical fringe. He also contends that the supposedly separate French, British, German, Dutch, and Italian enlightenments interacted to such a degree that their study in isolation gives a hopelessly distorted picture. A work of dazzling and highly accessible scholarship, Enlightenment Contested will be the definitive reference point for historians, philosophers, and anyone engaged with this fascinating period of human development.
Categories: Philosophy

The Architecture of Concepts

The Architecture of Concepts

See Jonathan I. Israel, Radical Enlightenment: Philosophy and the Making of
Modernity 1650–1750 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001); Enlightenment
Contested: Philosophy, Modernity, and the Emancipation of Man, 16701752, (
Oxford: ...

Author: Peter de Bolla

Publisher: Fordham Univ Press

ISBN: 9780823254408

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 308

View: 799

The Architecture of Concepts proposes a radically new way of understanding the history of ideas. Taking as its example human rights, it develops a distinctive kind of conceptual analysis that enables us to see with precision how the concept of human rights was formed in the eighteenth century. The first chapter outlines an innovative account of concepts as cultural entities. The second develops an original methodology for recovering the historical formation of the concept of human rights based on data extracted from digital archives. This enables us to track the construction of conceptual architectures over time. Having established the architecture of the concept of human rights, the book then examines two key moments in its historical formation: the First Continental Congress in 1775 and the publication of Tom Paine’s Rights of Man in 1792. Arguing that we have yet to fully understand or appreciate the consequences of the eighteenth-century invention of the concept “rights of man,” the final chapter addresses our problematic contemporary attempts to leverage human rights as the most efficacious way of achieving universal equality.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Theory of World Security

Theory of World Security

For an equally important study, contending that studies of separate national
enlightenments are distorting, see: Jonathan I. Israel, Enlightenment Contested.
Philosophy, Modernity, and the Emancipation of Man 16701752 (Oxford: Oxford
 ...

Author: Ken Booth

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139467506

Category: Political Science

Page:

View: 643

What is real? What can we know? How might we act? This book sets out to answer these fundamental philosophical questions in a radical and original theory of security for our times. Arguing that the concept of security in world politics has long been imprisoned by conservative thinking, Ken Booth explores security as a precious instrumental value which gives individuals and groups the opportunity to pursue the invention of humanity rather than live determined and diminished lives. Booth suggests that human society globally is facing a set of converging historical crises. He looks to critical social theory and radical international theory to develop a comprehensive framework for understanding the historical challenges facing global business-as-usual and for planning to reconstruct a more cosmopolitan future. Theory of World Security is a challenge both to well-established ways of thinking about security and alternative approaches within critical security studies.
Categories: Political Science

How Revolutionary Were the Bourgeois Revolutions

How Revolutionary Were the Bourgeois Revolutions

“why the scottish enlightenment was useful to the Framers of the american
Constitution,” Comparative Studies in Society ... Enlightenment Contested:
Philosophy, Modernity, and the Emancipation of Man, 16701752. oxford: oxford
university ...

Author: Neil

Publisher: Haymarket Books

ISBN: 9781608462650

Category: Political Science

Page: 840

View: 310

A historical defense of the concept of bourgeois revolution, from the sixteenth century to the twentieth.
Categories: Political Science

Enlightenment Shadows

Enlightenment Shadows

Prologue and Introduction There is a large secondary literature discussing the
upshot of Enlightenment thought from ... Enlightenment Contested: Philosophy,
Modernity and the Emancipation of Man, 16701752 (Oxford: Oxford University ...

Author: Genevieve Lloyd

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191648335

Category: Philosophy

Page: 192

View: 510

The idea of the Enlightenment has become a touchstone for emotive and often contradictory articulations of contemporary western values. Enlightenment Shadows is a study of the place of Enlightenment thought in intellectual history and of its continued relevance. Genevieve Lloyd focuses especially on what is distinctive in ideas of intellectual character offered by key Enlightenment thinkers—on their attitudes to belief and scepticism; on their optimism about the future; and on the uncertainties and instabilities which nonetheless often lurk beneath their use of imagery of light. The book is organized around interconnected close readings of a range of texts: Montesquieu's Persian Letters; Voltaire's Philosophical Dictionary; Hume's essay The Sceptic; Adam Smith's treatment of sympathy and imagination in Theory of Moral Sentiments; d'Alembert's Preliminary Discourse to the Encyclopedia—together with Diderot's entry on Encyclopedia; Diderot's Rameau's Nephew; and Kant's essay Perpetual Peace. Throughout, the readings highlight ways in which Enlightenment thinkers enacted in their writing—and reflected on—the interplay of intellect, imagination, and emotion. Recurring themes include: the nature of judgement—its relations with imagination and with ideals of objectivity; issues of truth and relativism; the ethical significance of imagining one's self into the situations of others; cosmopolitanism; tolerance; and the idea of the secular.
Categories: Philosophy

The Moral Culture of the Scottish Enlightenment

The Moral Culture of the Scottish Enlightenment

... in a trilogy of works (Radical Enlightenment: Philosophy and the Making of
Modernity, 1650–1750 [Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001]; Enlightenment
Contested: Philosophy, Modernity, and the Emancipation of Man,16701752 [
Oxford: ...

Author: Thomas Ahnert

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300153811

Category: Philosophy

Page: 224

View: 651

In the Enlightenment it was often argued that moral conduct, rather than adherence to theological doctrine, was the true measure of religious belief. Thomas Ahnert argues that this “enlightened” emphasis on conduct in religion relied less on arguments from reason alone than has been believed. In fact, Scottish Enlightenment champions advocated a practical program of “moral culture,” in which revealed religion was of central importance. Ahnert traces this to theological controversies going back as far as the Reformation concerning the conditions of salvation. His findings present a new point of departure for all scholars interested in the intersection of religion and Enlightenment.
Categories: Philosophy

Philosophy Begins in Wonder

Philosophy Begins in Wonder

An Introduction to Early Modern Philosophy, Theology, and Science Michael
Funk Deckard, Péter Losonczi ... Enlightenment Contested: Philosophy,
Modernity, and the Emancipation of Man 16701752 (oxford: oxford University
Press, 2006).

Author: Michael Funk Deckard

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781630877019

Category: Religion

Page: 390

View: 802

Philosophy begins with wonder, according to Plato and Aristotle. Yet Plato and Aristotle did not expand a great deal on what precisely wonder is. Does this fact alone not raise curiosity in us as to why this passion or concept is important? What is wonder's role in science, philosophy, or theology except to end thinking or theorizing as soon as one begins? The primary purpose of this book is to show how seventeenth- and eighteenth-century developments in natural theology, metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, aesthetics, and the philosophy of science resulted in a complex history of the passion of wonder-a history in which the elements of continuation, criticism, and reformulation are equally present. Philosophy Begins in Wonder provides the first historical overview of wonder and changes the way we see early modern Europe. It is intended for readers who are curious-who wonder-about how modern philosophy and science were born. The book is for scholars and educated readers alike.
Categories: Religion

Enlightened Evangelicalism

Enlightened Evangelicalism

Fania Oz-Salzberger, Translating the Enlightenment: Scottish Civic Discourse in
Eighteenth-Century Germany (Oxford: ... Jonathan Israel, Enlightenment
Contested: Philosophy, Modernity, and the Emancipation of Man, 16701752 (
Oxford: ...

Author: Jonathan Yeager

Publisher: OUP USA

ISBN: 9780199772551

Category: History

Page: 321

View: 454

This title tells how John Erskine was the leading evangelical in the Church of Scotland in the latter half of the 18th century. It explores how, educated in an enlightened setting at Edinburgh University, he learned to appreciate the epistemology of John Locke and other empiricists.
Categories: History

The Oxford Handbook of Postcolonial Studies

The Oxford Handbook of Postcolonial Studies

in What is Philosophy? New York: ... A Colony of Citizens: Revolution and Slave
Emancipation in the French Caribbean, 1787–1804. Chapel Hill: ...
Enlightenment Contested: Philosophy, Modernity, and the Emancipation of Man,
16701752.

Author: Graham Huggan

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199588251

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 734

View: 586

The Oxford Handbook of Postcolonial Studies is a major reference work, which aims to provide informed insights into the possible future of postcolonial studies as well as a comparative overview of the latest developments in the field.
Categories: Literary Collections

A Book Forged in Hell

A Book Forged in Hell

... Book Trade 1473–1941, ed. Lotte Hellinga, Alastair Duke, Jacob Harskamp,
and Theo Hermans, 233–43. Houten: Hes & De Graaf. ———. 2006.
Enlightenment Contested: Philosophy, Modernity and the Emancipation of Man
16701752.

Author: Steven Nadler

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400839513

Category: Philosophy

Page: 304

View: 170

The story of one of the most important—and incendiary—books in Western history When it appeared in 1670, Baruch Spinoza's Theological-Political Treatise was denounced as the most dangerous book ever published—"godless," "full of abominations," "a book forged in hell . . . by the devil himself." Religious and secular authorities saw it as a threat to faith, social and political harmony, and everyday morality, and its author was almost universally regarded as a religious subversive and political radical who sought to spread atheism throughout Europe. Yet Spinoza's book has contributed as much as the Declaration of Independence or Thomas Paine's Common Sense to modern liberal, secular, and democratic thinking. In A Book Forged in Hell, Steven Nadler tells the fascinating story of this extraordinary book: its radical claims and their background in the philosophical, religious, and political tensions of the Dutch Golden Age, as well as the vitriolic reaction these ideas inspired. It is not hard to see why Spinoza's Treatise was so important or so controversial, or why the uproar it caused is one of the most significant events in European intellectual history. In the book, Spinoza became the first to argue that the Bible is not literally the word of God but rather a work of human literature; that true religion has nothing to do with theology, liturgical ceremonies, or sectarian dogma; and that religious authorities should have no role in governing a modern state. He also denied the reality of miracles and divine providence, reinterpreted the nature of prophecy, and made an eloquent plea for toleration and democracy. A vivid story of incendiary ideas and vicious backlash, A Book Forged in Hell will interest anyone who is curious about the origin of some of our most cherished modern beliefs.
Categories: Philosophy

Comics and Power

Comics and Power

... Penguin Books, 1968. Israel, Jonathan I. Radical Enlightenment. Philosophy
and the Making of Modernity. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001. —.
Enlightenment contested. Philosophy, Modernity, and the Emancipation of Man
1670-1752.

Author: Anne Magnussen

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443875059

Category: Art

Page: 355

View: 800

Many introductions to comics scholarship books begin with an anecdote recounting the author’s childhood experiences reading comics, thereby testifying to the power of comics to engage and impact youth, but comics and power are intertwined in a numbers of ways that go beyond concern for children’s reading habits. Comics and Power presents very different methods of studying the complex and diverse relationship between comics and power. Divided into three sections, its 14 chapters discuss how comics interact with, reproduce, and/or challenge existing power structures – from the comics medium and its institutions to discourses about art, subjectivity, identity, and communities. The contributors and their work, as such, represent a new generation of comics research that combines the study of comics as a unique art form with a focus on the ways in which comics – like any other medium – participate in shaping the societies of which they are part.
Categories: Art

The Young Spinoza

The Young Spinoza

Pacific Philosophical Quarterly, forthcoming. Israel, Jonathan. Enlightenment
Contested: Philosophy, Modernity, and the Emancipation of Man, 16701752.
Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2006. Israel, Jonathan. “Philosophy,
Commerce ...

Author: Yitzhak Y. Melamed

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199971688

Category: Philosophy

Page: 320

View: 518

Ex nihilo nihil fit. Philosophy, especially great philosophy, does not appear out of the blue. In the current volume, a team of top scholars-both up-and-coming and established-attempts to trace the philosophical development of one of the greatest philosophers of all time. Featuring twenty new essays and an introduction, it is the first attempt of its kind in English and its appearance coincides with the recent surge of interest in Spinoza in Anglo-American philosophy. Spinoza's fame-or notoriety-is due primarily to his posthumously published magnum opus, the Ethics, and, to a lesser extent, to the 1670 Theological-Political Treatise. Few readers take the time to study his early works carefully. If they do, they are likely to encounter some surprising claims, which often diverge from, or even utterly contradict, the doctrines of the Ethics. Consider just a few of these assertions: that God acts from absolute freedom of will, that God is a whole, that there are no modes in God, that extension is divisible and hence cannot be an attribute of God, and that the intellectual and corporeal substances are modes in relation to God. Yet, though these claims reveal some tension between the early works and the Ethics, there is also a clear continuity between them. Spinoza wrote the Ethics over a long period of time, which spanned most of his philosophical career. The dates of the early drafts of the Ethics seem to overlap with the assumed dates of the composition of the Treatise on the Emendation of the Intellect and the Short Treatise on God, Man, and His Well Being and precede the publication of Spinoza's 1663 book on Descartes' Principles of Philosophy. For this reason, a study of Spinoza's early works (and correspondence) can illuminate the nature of the problems Spinoza addresses in the Ethics, insofar as the views expressed in the early works help us reconstruct the development and genealogy of the Ethics. Indeed, if we keep in mind the common dictum "nothing comes from nothing"-which Spinoza frequently cites and appeals to-it is clear that great works like the Ethics do not appear ex nihilo. In light of the preeminence and majesty of the Ethics, it is difficult to study the early works without having the Ethics in sight. Still, we would venture to say that the value of Spinoza's early works is not at all limited to their being stations on the road leading to the Ethics. A teleological attitude of such a sort would celebrate the works of the "mature Spinoza" at the expense of the early works. However, we have no reason to assume that on all issues the views of the Ethics are better argued, developed, and motivated than those of the early works. In other words, we should keep our minds open to the possibility that on some issues the early works might contain better analysis and argumentation than the Ethics.
Categories: Philosophy

Organizing Enlightenment

Organizing Enlightenment

Israel, Jonathan I. Enlightenment Contested: Philosophy, Modernity, and the
Emancipation of Man 16701752. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006.
Jeismann, Karl-Ernst. Das preußische Gymnasium in Staat und Gesellschaft. Vol.
2.

Author: Chad Wellmon

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9781421416168

Category: Education

Page: 368

View: 835

Since its inception, the research university has been the central institution of knowledge in the West. Today its intellectual authority is being challenged on many fronts, above all by radical technological change. Organizing Enlightenment tells the story of how the university emerged in the early nineteenth century at a similarly fraught moment of cultural anxiety about revolutionary technologies and their disruptive effects on established institutions of knowledge. Drawing on the histories of science, the university, and print, as well as media theory and philosophy, Chad Wellmon explains how the research university and the ethic of disciplinarity it created emerged as the final and most lasting technology of the Enlightenment. Organizing Enlightenment reveals higher education’s story as one not only of the production of knowledge but also of the formation of a particular type of person: the disciplinary self. In order to survive, the university would have to institutionalize a new order of knowledge, one that was self-organizing, internally coherent, and embodied in the very character of the modern, critical scholar.
Categories: Education

The Erosion of Biblical Certainty

The Erosion of Biblical Certainty

... Radical Enlightenment: Philosophy and the Making of Modernity, 1650–1750 (
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001); and Israel, Enlightenment Contested:
Philosophy, Modernity, and the Emancipation of Man 16701752 (Oxford: Oxford
 ...

Author: Michael J. Lee

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137299666

Category: History

Page: 244

View: 529

According to conventional wisdom, by the late 1800s, the image of Bible as a supernatural and infallible text crumbled in the eyes of intellectuals under the assaults of secularizing forces. This book corrects the narrative by arguing that in America, the road to skepticism had already been paved by the Scriptures' most able and ardent defenders.
Categories: History

From White to Yellow

From White to Yellow

Enlightenment Contested: Philosophy, Modernity, and the Emancipation of Man,
16701752. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006. – “Philosophy, History of
Philosophy, and l'Histoire de l'Esprit Humain: A Historiographical Question and ...

Author: Rotem Kowner

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 9780773596849

Category: History

Page: 678

View: 121

When Europeans first landed in Japan they encountered people they perceived as white-skinned and highly civilized, but these impressions did not endure. Gradually the Europeans' positive impressions faded away and Japanese were seen as yellow-skinned and relatively inferior. Accounting for this dramatic transformation, From White to Yellow is a groundbreaking study of the evolution of European interpretations of the Japanese and the emergence of discourses about race in early modern Europe. Transcending the conventional focus on Africans and Jews within the rise of modern racism, Rotem Kowner demonstrates that the invention of race did not emerge in a vacuum in eighteenth-century Europe, but rather was a direct product of earlier discourses of the "Other." This compelling study indicates that the racial discourse on the Japanese, alongside the Chinese, played a major role in the rise of the modern concept of race. While challenging Europe's self-possession and sense of centrality, the discourse delayed the eventual consolidation of a hierarchical worldview in which Europeans stood immutably at the apex. Drawing from a vast array of primary sources, From White to Yellow traces the racial roots of the modern clash between Japan and the West.
Categories: History

The Phoenix

The Phoenix

St. Paul's Cathedral And The Men Who Made Modern London Leo Hollis.
Godolphin, Oxford ... Enlightenment Contested: Philosophy, Modernity and the
Emancipation of Man 16701752, Oxford University Press, 2006. Jardine, L., On
a ...

Author: Leo Hollis

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781780221106

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 878

*Perfect for fans of ITV's epic drama series, THE GREAT FIRE* Opening in the 1640s, as the city was gripped in tumult leading up to the English Civil War, THE PHOENIX charts the lives and works of five extraordinary men, who would grow up in the chaos of a world turned upside down: the architect, Sir Christopher Wren; gardener and virtuosi, John Evelyn; the scientist, Robert Hooke; the radical philosopher, John Locke and the builder, Nicholas Barbon. At the heart of the story is the rebuilding of London's iconic cathedral, St Paul's. Interweaving science, architecture, history and philosophy, THE PHOENIX tells the story of the formation of the first modern city.
Categories: History

States of War

States of War

Marc A. Lepain (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1998); Jonathan
Israel, Enlightenment Contested: Philosophy, Modernity, and the Emancipation of
Man, 16701752 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006); Mark Hulliung, ...

Author: David William Bates

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231528665

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 844

We fear that the growing threat of violent attack has upset the balance between existential concepts of political power, which emphasize security, and traditional notions of constitutional limits meant to protect civil liberties. We worry that constitutional states cannot, during a time of war, terror, and extreme crisis, maintain legality and preserve civil rights and freedoms. David Williams Bates allays these concerns by revisiting the theoretical origins of the modern constitutional state, which, he argues, recognized and made room for tensions among law, war, and the social order. We traditionally associate the Enlightenment with the taming of absolutist sovereign power through the establishment of a legal state based on the rights of individuals. In his critical rereading, Bates shows instead that Enlightenment thinkers conceived of political autonomy in a systematic, theoretical way. Focusing on the nature of foundational violence, war, and existential crises, eighteenth-century thinkers understood law and constitutional order not as constraints on political power but as the logical implication of that primordial force. Returning to the origin stories that informed the beginnings of political community, Bates reclaims the idea of law, warfare, and the social order as intertwining elements subject to complex historical development. Following an analysis of seminal works by seventeenth-century natural-law theorists, Bates reviews the major canonical thinkers of constitutional theory (Locke, Montesquieu, and Rousseau) from the perspective of existential security and sovereign power. Countering Carl Schmitt's influential notion of the autonomy of the political, Bates demonstrates that Enlightenment thinkers understood the autonomous political sphere as a space of law protecting individuals according to their political status, not as mere members of a historically contingent social order.
Categories: Political Science

Rousseau and Hobbes

Rousseau and Hobbes

Israel, Jonathan, Enlightenment Contested: Philosophy, Modernity, and the
Emancipation of Man, 16701752 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006). James
, David, Rousseau and German Idealism: Freedom, Dependence and Necessity
 ...

Author: Robin Douglass

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191038037

Category: Philosophy

Page: 240

View: 537

Robin Douglass presents the first comprehensive study of Jean-Jacques Rousseau's engagement with Thomas Hobbes. He reconstructs the intellectual context of this engagement to reveal the deeply polemical character of Rousseau's critique of Hobbes and to show how Rousseau sought to expose that much modern natural law and doux commerce theory was, despite its protestations to the contrary, indebted to a Hobbesian account of human nature and the origins of society. Throughout the book Douglass explores the reasons why Rousseau both followed and departed from Hobbes in different places, while resisting the temptation to present him as either a straightforwardly Hobbesian or anti-Hobbesian thinker. On the one hand, Douglass reveals the extent to which Rousseau was occupied with problems of a fundamentally Hobbesian nature and the importance, to both thinkers, of appealing to the citizens' passions in order to secure political unity. On the other hand, Douglass argues that certain ideas at the heart of Rousseau's philosophy—free will and the natural goodness of man—were set out to distance him from positions associated with Hobbes. Douglass advances an original interpretation of Rousseau's political philosophy, emerging from this encounter with Hobbesian ideas, which focuses on the interrelated themes of nature, free will, and the passions. Douglass distances his interpretation from those who have read Rousseau as a proto-Kantian and instead argues that his vision of a well-ordered republic was based on cultivating man's naturally good passions to render the life of the virtuous citizen in accordance with nature.
Categories: Philosophy

Prescribing Ovid

Prescribing Ovid

Introduction: Cultivating the Two Apollos Touring the Latin Enlightenment To
compose one's life in Latin verse, to make ... Enlightenment Contested:
Philosophy, Modernity, and the Emancipation of Man 16701752 (Oxford: Oxford
University ...

Author: Yasmin Haskell

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9780715637234

Category: History

Page: 268

View: 941

Explores the politics of Latin language use in the Enlightenment 'Republic of Letters' via the figure of Gerard Nicolaas Heerkens (1728-1801).
Categories: History

The Undiscovered Dewey

The Undiscovered Dewey

5 and 7; Jonathan Israel, Enlightenment Contested: Philosophy, Modernity, and
the Emancipation of Man, 16701752 (New York: Oxford University Press, 2006);
Jerrold Seigel, The Idea of the Self: Thought and Experience in Western Europe ...

Author: Melvin L. Rogers

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231516167

Category: Philosophy

Page: 352

View: 482

The Undiscovered Dewey explores the profound influence of evolution and its corresponding ideas of contingency and uncertainty on John Dewey's philosophy of action, particularly its argument that inquiry proceeds from the uncertainty of human activity. Dewey separated the meaningfulness of inquiry from a larger metaphysical story concerning the certainty of human progress. He then connected this thread to the way in which our reflective capacities aid us in improving our lives. Dewey therefore launched a new understanding of the modern self that encouraged intervention in social and natural environments but which nonetheless demanded courage and humility because of the intimate relationship between action and uncertainty. Melvin L. Rogers explicitly connects Dewey's theory of inquiry to his religious, moral, and political philosophy. He argues that, contrary to common belief, Dewey sought a place for religious commitment within a democratic society sensitive to modern pluralism. Against those who regard Dewey as indifferent to moral conflict, Rogers points to Dewey's appreciation for the incommensurability of our ethical commitments. His deep respect for modern pluralism, argues Rogers, led Dewey to articulate a negotiation between experts and the public so that power did not lapse into domination. Exhibiting an abiding faith in the reflective and contestable character of inquiry, Dewey strongly engaged with the complexity of our religious, moral, and political lives.
Categories: Philosophy