Nicknames of Places

Origins and Meanings of the Alternate and Secondary Names, Sobriquets, Titles, Epithets and Slogans for 4600 Places Worldwide

Author: Adrian Room

Publisher: McFarland Publishing

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 357

View: 7202

DOWNLOAD NOW »

"Many places in the world, from the smallest settlement to the largest expanse of land or water, have a secondary name. This new dictionary is devoted to over 4,500 such names. The Dictionary entries are arranged alphabetically by secondary name and include the city's real name, its location, and an explanation of the secondary name"--Provided by publisher.
Release

The Pleasure Garden, from Vauxhall to Coney Island

Author: Jonathan Conlin

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812207327

Category: Architecture

Page: 328

View: 8875

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Summers at the Vauxhall pleasure garden in London brought diverse entertainments to a diverse public. Picturesque walks and arbors offered a pastoral retreat from the city, while at the same time the garden's attractions indulged distinctly urban tastes for fashion, novelty, and sociability. High- and low-born alike were free to walk the paths; the proximity to strangers and the danger of dark walks were as thrilling to visitors as the fountains and fireworks. Vauxhall was the venue that made the careers of composers, inspired novelists, and showcased the work of artists. Scoundrels, sudden downpours, and extortionate ham prices notwithstanding, Vauxhall became a must-see destination for both Londoners and tourists. Before long, there were Vauxhalls across Britain and America, from York to New York, Norwich to New Orleans. This edited volume provides the first book-length study of the attractions and interactions of the pleasure garden, from the opening of Vauxhall in the seventeenth century to the amusement parks of the early twentieth. Nine essays explore the mutual influences of human behavior and design: landscape, painting, sculpture, and even transient elements such as lighting and music tacitly informed visitors how to move within the space, what to wear, how to behave, and where they might transgress. The Pleasure Garden, from Vauxhall to Coney Island draws together the work of musicologists, art historians, and scholars of urban studies and landscape design to unfold a cultural history of pleasure gardens, from the entertainments they offered to the anxieties of social difference they provoked.
Release

The Island Garden

England's Language of Nation from Gildas to Marvell

Author: Lynn Staley

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780268041403

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 345

View: 1758

DOWNLOAD NOW »

For centuries England's writers used the metaphor of their country as an island garden to engage in a self-conscious debate about national identity. In The Island Garden: England's Language of Nation from Gildas to Marvell, Lynn Staley suggests that the trope of Britain as an island garden catalyzed two crucial historical perspectives and thus analytic modes: as isolated and vulnerable, England stood in a potentially hostile relation to the world outside its encircling sea; as semi-enclosed and permeable, it also accepted recuperative relationships with those who moved across its boundaries. Identifying the concept of enclosure as key to Britain's language of place, Staley traces the shifting meanings of this concept in medieval and early modern histories, treatises, and poems. Beginning with Gildas in the sixth century, Staley maintains that the metaphor of England as the island garden was complicated, first, by Bede in the eighth century and later by historians, polemicists, and antiquarians. It allowed them to debate the nature of England's identity in language whose point might be subversive but that was beyond royal retribution. During the reign of Edward III, William Langland employed the subjects and anxieties linked to the island garden metaphor to create an alternative image of England as a semi-enclosed garden in need of proper cultivation. Staley demonstrates that Langland's translation of the metaphor for nation from a discreet and royal space into a communally productive half-acre was reformulated by writers such as Chaucer, Hoccleve, Tusser, Johnson, and Marvell, as well as others, to explore the tensions in England's social and political institutions. From the early thirteenth to the seventeenth centuries, English treatments of the biblical story of Susanna capture this self-conscious use of metaphoric language and suggest a perspective on law, individual rights, and conscience that is ultimately crucial to England's self-conception and description. Staley identifies in literary discourse a persistent argument for England as a garden that is enclosed yet not isolated, and that is protected by a law whose ideal is a common good that even kings must serve. The Island Garden is a fascinating and focused exploration of the ways in which authors have developed a language of place to construct England's cultural, social, and political identity. "Lynn Staley's The Island Garden: England's Language of Nation from Gildas to Marvell is a capacious, erudite, ruminative, recursive work that explores the complex web of discourses that composed the identity and history of England. Staley shows us the ways in which writers formed a range of images for England as they engaged with different political contexts. Hers is not a unilinear, teleological history; rather, we encounter a patient display of continuity in the resources of historical imagination from medieval to early modern." --David Aers, Duke University
Release

The Lore of the Land

A Guide to England's Legends, from Spring-heeled Jack to the Witches of Warboys

Author: Jennifer Westwood,Jacqueline Simpson

Publisher: Penguin Books

ISBN: N.A

Category: Folklore

Page: 917

View: 6172

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Stop off at any English village or town or wander through the countryside and you will almost certainly brush up against some deep-rooted local myth or legend. This text looks at some of these stories, county by county, explaining when they date from, how they arose and what basis, if any, they have in fact.
Release