Einstein and Religion

Einstein and Religion

Both thought-provoking and engaging, this book aims to introduce readers, without proselytizing, to Einstein's religion.

Author: Max Jammer

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400840878

Category: Science

Page: 288

View: 367

The philosophy of religion and the quest for spiritual truth preoccupied Albert Einstein--so much that it has been said "one might suspect he was a disguised theologian." Nevertheless, the literature on the life and work of Einstein, extensive as it is, does not provide an adequate account of his religious conception and sentiments. Only fragmentarily known, Einstein's ideas about religion have been often distorted both by atheists and by religious groups eager to claim him as one of their own. But what exactly was Einstein's religious credo? In this fascinating book, the distinguished physicist and philosopher Max Jammer offers an unbiased and well-documented answer to this question. The book begins with a discussion of Einstein's childhood religious education and the religious atmosphere--or its absence--among his family and friends. It then reconstructs, step by step, the intellectual development that led Einstein to the conceptions of a cosmic religion and an impersonal God, akin to "the God of Spinoza." Jammer explores Einstein's writings and lectures on religion and its role in society, and how far they have been accepted by the general public and by professional theologians like Paul Tillich or Frederick Ferré. He also analyzes the precise meaning of Einstein's famous dictum "Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind," and why this statement can serve as an epitome of Einstein's philosophy of religion. The last chapter deals with the controversial question of whether Einstein's scientific work, and in particular his theory of relativity, has theologically significant implications, a problem important for those who are interested in the relation between science and religion. Both thought-provoking and engaging, this book aims to introduce readers, without proselytizing, to Einstein's religion.
Categories: Science

Einstein on Cosmic Religion and Other Opinions and Aphorisms

Einstein on Cosmic Religion and Other Opinions and Aphorisms

Einstein's essays explore science as the basis for a "cosmic" religion, embraced by all who share a sense of wonder in the universe. Additional topics include pacifism, disarmament, and Zionism.

Author: Albert Einstein

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 9780486113128

Category: Science

Page: 112

View: 245

Einstein's essays explore science as the basis for a "cosmic" religion, embraced by all who share a sense of wonder in the universe. Additional topics include pacifism, disarmament, and Zionism.
Categories: Science

Galileo Goes to Jail and Other Myths about Science and Religion

Galileo Goes to Jail and Other Myths about Science and Religion

how relativity has functioned in religious contexts, see Jammer, Einstein and Religion, 153–266, and Matthew Stanley, Practical Mystic: Religion, Science, and A. S. Eddington (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007), 153–247.

Author: Ronald L. Numbers

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674057418

Category: Science

Page: 320

View: 800

If we want nonscientists and opinion-makers in the press, the lab, and the pulpit to take a fresh look at the relationship between science and religion, Ronald L. Numbers suggests that we must first dispense with the hoary myths that have masqueraded too long as historical truths. Until about the 1970s, the dominant narrative in the history of science had long been that of science triumphant, and science at war with religion. But a new generation of historians both of science and of the church began to examine episodes in the history of science and religion through the values and knowledge of the actors themselves. Now Ronald Numbers has recruited the leading scholars in this new history of science to puncture the myths, from Galileo’s incarceration to Darwin’s deathbed conversion to Einstein’s belief in a personal God who “didn’t play dice with the universe.” The picture of science and religion at each other’s throats persists in mainstream media and scholarly journals, but each chapter in Galileo Goes to Jail shows how much we have to gain by seeing beyond the myths.
Categories: Science

A Theory of Everything That Matters

A Theory of Everything  That Matters

A Short Guide to Einstein, Relativity and the Future of Faith Alister McGrath ... For comment, see Jammer, Einstein and Religion, 125–27. 31. ... Einstein, Cosmic Religion with Other Opinions and Aphorisms, 84. 33.

Author: Alister E McGrath

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781529377972

Category: Religion

Page: 192

View: 103

On 29th May 1919, British astronomers tested Einstein's theory of relativity by measuring the path of the stars travelling near the sun during an eclipse. On 7th November 1919, the results of that experiment were announced in London, proving Einstein's theory of relativity. A Theory of Everything (that Matters) has been written in celebration of this 100th anniversary. With the confirmation of Einstein's theories at the beginning of the twentieth century, our understanding of the universe became much more complex. What does this mean for religious belief, and specifically Christianity? Does it mean, as so many people assume, the death of God? In A Theory of Everything (that Matters) Alister McGrath - Professor of Science and Religion at Oxford University - explores these questions, giving an overview of Einstein's thought and scientific theories, including his nuanced thinking on the difference between the scientific enterprise and beliefs outside its realm. This groundbreaking book is for anyone intrigued by Einstein as one of the twentieth century's most iconic figures, who wants to know what his theories mean for religion, and who is interested in the conversation between science and religions more broadly. 'An excellent study of Einstein's theories in relation to his beliefs about God' - starred review in PUBLISHERS WEEKLY
Categories: Religion

Einstein For Dummies

Einstein For Dummies

Insights. into. Einstein's. Beliefs. on. Religion. and. Philosophy. In This Chapter ▷ Understanding Einstein's religious heritage ▷ Discovering Einstein's religion ▷ Recognizing Einstein's philosophical views ...

Author: Carlos I. Calle

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780764583483

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 393

View: 115

Genius demystified, the Dummies way! In 1905, Albert Einstein revolutionized modern physics with his theory of relativity. He went on to become a twentieth-century icon-a man whose name and face are synonymous with "genius." Now, at last, ordinary readers can explore Einstein's life and work in this new For Dummies guide. Physicist Carlos Calle chronicles Einstein's career and explains his work-including the theories of special and general relativity-in language that anyone can understand. He shows how Einstein's discoveries affected everything from the development of the atom bomb to the theory of quantum mechanics. He sheds light on Einstein's personal life and beliefs, including his views on religion and politics. And he shows how Einstein's work continues to affect our world today, from nuclear power to space travel to artificial intelligence.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Eminent Lives in Twentieth century Science Religion

Eminent Lives in Twentieth century Science   Religion

Einstein referred to this second level as " social " or " moral religion " ( soziale or moralische Religion ) . He observed that most of the so - called " higher religions " of the Near East , that is Judaism , Christianity and Islam ...

Author: Nicolaas A. Rupke

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 3631581203

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 284

Can science and religion coexist in harmony? Or is conflict inevitable? In this volume an international team of distinguished scholars addresses these enduring yet urgent questions by examining the lives of thirteen eminent twentieth-century scientists whose careers were marked by the interaction of science and religion: Rachel Carson, Charles A. Coulson, Theodosius Dobzhansky, Arthur S. Eddington, Albert Einstein, Ronald A. Fisher, Julian Huxley, Pascual Jordan, Robert A. Millikan, Ivan P. Pavlov, Michael I. Pupin, Abdus Salam, and Edward O. Wilson. The richly empirical studies show a diversity of creative engagements between science and religion that defy efforts to set the two at odds.
Categories: History

Albert Einstein s Concept of God and Religion

Albert Einstein s Concept of God and Religion

This research work covers a part of Albert Einstein's non-scientific works.

Author: Elexie Irasian Rieza

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:989196902

Category:

Page: 154

View: 586

This research work covers a part of Albert Einstein's non-scientific works. It is an exposition of his distinct idea about God through his concept of Religion. Albert Einstein never embraced an organized religion. Born Jewish, he shed the customs and traditions of Judaism when he was twelve and never associated himself with conventional religion again. However it would not be true to say that Einstein was not religious. He often expressed a deep awe and appreciation for what he described as "the mysterious," which he claimed was the essence of any religion. At the age of twelve, Einstein discovered the world of science and the Bible stories he had so enjoyed now sounded like lies told to children. He reversed completely his youthful "religious paradise" and rejected the world of what he now perceived to be fairy tales. Einstein believed in something he called, "cosmic religion." In studying the universe, he felt that humans were inherently limited to only a partial understanding of nature. There would always be a level of existence that humans could not comprehend: something complex, unexplainable and subtle. Respect and love for the "mysteriousness" was the "cosmic religion." In November 9, 1930 he wrote an article entitled: "Religion and Science", he presented his own theory regarding the three states of religious evolution namely: a.) religion of fear; b) social or moral religion and c.) cosmic religion. At the beginning, he said, people faced the simple fear of the dangers of the nature, and this led to a belief that there must be something powerful whose whims dictate human fate. Next comes the idea of an anthropomorphic God who can punish or reward, thus, leading to concepts of morality as well as answering questions about life after death. Beyond this, he added, is the cosmic religion, a feeling of human impotence and futility in the face of nature and the "world of thought." He posits that the universe and its workings are what inspire awe. In this kind of religosity, the practitioner wishes to experience being part of the universe in a much more holistic way, as opposed to being an individual separate from it. Ultimately, Einstein insisted that this feeling was so universal, so free of dogma, that no single church could encompass it. Thus, "cosmic religion" is inherently separate from organized religion-and this type of religion that Einstein embraced. Indeed, said Einstein, it was the highest purpose of all science and art to inspire this intense level of feeling. Moreover, if one could not achieve a sense of the "mysterious," one may as well be dead. Clearly, religion-albeit a very specific definition of religion - was the other half of his notion of God because it explicates how he viewed God.
Categories:

Pantheologies

Pantheologies

Einstein's Faith Defended,” The New York Times, November 10, 1930. 20. “Science and Religion,” Time, September 23, 1940, 52. 21. Ibid. 22. Albert Einstein, “Science and Religion,” in Ideas and Opinions, ed.

Author: Mary-Jane Rubenstein

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231548342

Category: Religion

Page: 294

View: 849

Pantheism is the idea that God and the world are identical—that the creator, sustainer, destroyer, and transformer of all things is the universe itself. From a monotheistic perspective, this notion is irremediably heretical since it suggests divinity might be material, mutable, and multiple. Since the excommunication of Baruch Spinoza, Western thought has therefore demonized what it calls pantheism, accusing it of incoherence, absurdity, and—with striking regularity—monstrosity. In this book, Mary-Jane Rubenstein investigates this perennial repugnance through a conceptual genealogy of pantheisms. What makes pantheism “monstrous”—at once repellent and seductive—is that it scrambles the raced and gendered distinctions that Western philosophy and theology insist on drawing between activity and passivity, spirit and matter, animacy and inanimacy, and creator and created. By rejecting the fundamental difference between God and world, pantheism threatens all the other oppositions that stem from it: light versus darkness, male versus female, and humans versus every other organism. If the panic over pantheism has to do with a fear of crossed boundaries and demolished hierarchies, then the question becomes what a present-day pantheism might disrupt and what it might reconfigure. Cobbling together heterogeneous sources—medieval heresies, their pre- and anti-Socratic forebears, general relativity, quantum mechanics, nonlinear biologies, multiverse and indigenous cosmologies, ecofeminism, animal and vegetal studies, and new and old materialisms—Rubenstein assembles possible pluralist pantheisms. By mobilizing this monstrous mixture of unintentional God-worlds, Pantheologies gives an old heresy the chance to renew our thinking.
Categories: Religion

THUS SPOKE EINSTEIN on LIFE and LIVING

THUS SPOKE EINSTEIN on LIFE and LIVING

Wisdom of Albert Einstein in the Context V. Alexander Stefan. XIX. EINSTEIN ON SCIENCE AND RELIGION (Science without Religion Is Lame, Religion without Science Is Blind) 663“Science without religion is lame,” says Einstein, “religion ...

Author: V. Alexander Stefan

Publisher: Stefan University Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 559

View: 272

THUS SPOKE EINSTEIN on LIFE and LIVING Wisdom of Albert Einstein in the Context Selected, Edited, and Commented by V. Alexander STEFAN Institute for Advanced Physics Studies Stefan University
Categories: Science

Einstein and Twentieth Century Politics

Einstein and Twentieth Century Politics

He strove to define religion in a way that would retain meaning for him while ruling out virtually the whole of conventional religious belief and practice. In an article published in the New York Times in 1930 he posited an evolutionary ...

Author: Richard Crockatt

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191088292

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 293

Albert Einstein, world-renowned as a physicist, was also publicly committed to radical political views. Despite the vast literature on Einstein, Einstein and Twentieth- Century Politics is the first comprehensive study of his politics, covering his opinions and campaigns on pacifism, Zionism, control of nuclear weapons, world government, freedom, and racial equality. Most studies look at Einstein in isolation but here he is viewed alongside a 'liberal international' of global intellectuals, including Gandhi, Albert Schweitzer, Bertrand Russell, H.G. Wells, George Bernard Shaw, Romain Rolland, Thomas Mann, and John Dewey. Frequently called upon to join campaigns on great issues of war, peace, and social values, they all knew or corresponded with Einstein. This volume examines how Einstein and comparable intellectuals sought to exert a 'salutary influence', as Einstein put it in a letter to Freud. Close attention is given to the unique qualities Einstein brought to his interventions in political debate. His influence derived in the first instance from his celebrity status as the scientist of genius whose theory of relativity was both incomprehensible to most and seemingly relevant to many aspects of aspects of culture and the cosmos. Einstein's complex and enigmatic personality, which combined intense devotion to privacy and a capacity to perform on the public stage, also contributed to the Einstein myth. Studying Einstein's politics, it is argued here, takes us not only into the mind of Einstein but to the heart of the great public issues of the twentieth century.
Categories: History