Egypt Temple of the Whole World

Egypt   Temple of the Whole World

The essays in this volume, all written by friends and disciples of the renowned Egyptologist Jan Assmann, reflect his tremendous impact on the scholarly world and encompass a wealth of cultural and religious themes both within and beyond ...

Author: Sibylle Meyer

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789047402527

Category: Religion

Page: 451

View: 934

The essays in this volume, all written by friends and disciples of the renowned Egyptologist Jan Assmann, reflect his tremendous impact on the scholarly world and encompass a wealth of cultural and religious themes both within and beyond Ancient Egypt.
Categories: Religion

Egypt was the image of heaven on earth and temple of the whole world

Egypt was the image of heaven on earth and temple of the whole world

We believe the story of the Atlantis to be no fable, and maintain that at different epochs of the past huge islands, and even continents, existed where now there is but a wild waste of waters.

Author: Helena Petrovna Blavatsky

Publisher: Philaletheians UK

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 77

View: 712

Ancient India and Egypt were the oldest group of nations. The Egyptian Pyramids antedate the upheaval of the Sahara and other deserts. But there is no comparison between the Egypt of old, with its perfection of art, science, and religion, its glorious cities and monuments, its swarming The Egyptian art of writing was perfect and complete from the very first. It was used as early as the days of Menes, the protomonarch. Before Greece came into existence, the arts, with the Egyptians, were already ripe and old. Ancient Greece owes everything to Egypt. The Greeks learned all they knew, including the sacred services of the temple, from the Egyptians and, because of that, their principal temples were consecrated to Egyptian divinities. Orpheus was a disciple of Moses. Pythagoras, Herodotus, and Plato owe their philosophy to the same temples in which the wise Solon was instructed by the priests. If Chaldea, Assyria, and Babylon presented stupendous and venerable antiquities reaching far back into the night of time, Persia was not without her wonders of a later date. The Persian Empire was truly the garden of the world. Ecbatana, the cool summer retreat of the Persian Kings, was defended by seven encircling walls of hewn and polished blocks, the interior ones in succession of increasing height, and of different colours, in astrological accordance with the seven planets. The sublime profundity of the Magian precepts is beyond the reach of modern materialistic thought. Even the much admired Etruscan paintings and decorative borders, found on Greek vases, were but copies from Egyptian vases. Their figures can be seen on the walls of a tomb of the age of Amenhotep I, a period at which Greece was not even in existence. Egypt, grown grey in her wisdom, was so secure of her acquirements that she did not invite admiration and cared no more for the opinion of the flippant Greek than we do today for that of a Fiji islander. For she was much older and grander than Greece. The Egyptian Zodiac is at least 75 millennia old; the Greek, 17 millennia old. Egypt pressed her own grapes, made wine, and brewed her own beer. The superiority of the Egyptian lyre over the Grecian is an admitted fact. Pythagoras learned music in Egypt and made a regular science of it in Italy. The lyre, harp, and flute were used for sacred concerts; for festive occasions they had the guitar, the single and double pipes, and castanets; for troops, and during military service, they had trumpets, tambourines, drums, and cymbals. Amenoph II, who reigned at Thebes long before the Trojan war, is represented as playing chess with the queen. In India the game is known to have been played at least 5,000 years ago. The Egyptians had their dentists and ophthalmologists, and no doctor was allowed to practice more than one specialty. Phoenician sails whitened the Indian Ocean, as well as the Norwegian fiords. The Phœnicians were the earliest navigators of the world; they were Cyclopes, a one-eyed race of giants; they founded most of the colonies of the Mediterranean, and visited the Arctic regions, whence they brought accounts of eternal days without a night, which Homer has preserved for us in the Odyssey. Homer’s Odyssey surpasses in fantastic nonsense all the tales of the Arabian Nights combined; nevertheless, many of his myths are now proved to be something else besides the creation of the old poet’s fancy. Bel and the Dragon, Apollo and Python, Osiris and Typhon are all one and the same, and have travelled far and wide. The religious customs of the Mexicans, Peruvians, and other American races are identical with those of the ancient Phœnicians, Babylonians, and Egyptians. There was a time when Asia, Europe, Africa, and America were covered with the temples sacred to the Sun and the Dragons. It is true that the Phœnicians represented the Sun under the image of a Dragon; but so did all the other people who symbolized their Sun-gods. Initiatory rites and ceremonies were performed in crypts, catacombs, and temples interlinked by subterranean passages running in every direction. The perfect identity of rites, ceremonies, traditions, and even the names of deities, among Mexicans, Babylonians, and Egyptians, is ample proof of pre-historic South America being peopled by a colony which mysteriously found its way across the Atlantic. We believe the story of the Atlantis to be no fable, and maintain that at different epochs of the past huge islands, and even continents, existed where now there is but a wild waste of waters. At a remote epoch a traveller could traverse what is now the Atlantic Ocean, almost the entire distance by land, crossing in boats from one island to another, where narrow straits then existed. There never was, nor can there be, more than one universal religion. The Aztecs resembled the ancient Egyptians in civilization and refinement. Among both peoples magic, or the arcane natural philosophy, was cultivated to the highest degree. All ancient religious monuments, in whatever land, are the expression of the same identical thought, the key to which is in the Esoteric Doctrine. The grandiose Hindu ruins of Ellora in the Dekkan, the Mexican Chichén-Itzá in Yucatán, and the still grander ruins of Copán in Guatemala, were built by peoples moved by the same religious ideas, and who had reached an equal level of highest civilization in arts and sciences. The ruins of the past Egyptian splendour deserve no higher eulogium than those of Siam. If the same workmen did not lay the courses in both countries we must at least think that the secret of this matchless wall-building was equally known to the architects of every land. Nagkon-Wat is grander than anything left to us by Athens or Rome. On its sculptured walls there are several repetitions of Dagon, the man-fish of the Babylonians, of the Kabeirian gods of Samothrace, as well as of the reputed father of the Kabeiroi, Vulcan, with his bolts and implements. In another place we find Vulcan, recognizable by his hammer and pincers, but under the shape of a monkey, as usually represented by the Egyptians. The Ramayana itself, the famous epic poem, is but the original of Homer’s Iliad. The beautiful Paris, carrying off Helen, looks very much like Ravana, king of the giants, eloping with Sita, Rama’s wife. Herodotus assures us that the Trojan heroes and gods date in Greece only from the days of the Iliad. In such a case even Hanuman, the monkey-god, would be but Vulcan in disguise. Many historians claim that the Jews were similar or identical with the ancient Phœnicians, however, the latter were beyond any doubt an Æthiopian race. If the Jews were in the twilight of history Phœnicians, the latter may be traced to the nations who used the old Sanskrit language. All ancient temples and buildings belong to the age of Hermes Trismegistus. And however comparatively modern or ancient the temples may seem, their mathematical proportions correspond perfectly with the Egyptian religious edifices. The cold, stony lips of the once vocal Memnon, and of these hardy sphinxes, keep their secrets well. Who will unseal them? Who of our modern, materialistic dwarfs and unbelieving Sadducees will dare to lift the Veil of Isis? The Babylonian Nebo, the Thoth of Memphis, the Greek Hermes, were all gods of Esoteric Wisdom. Ammonius Saccas declared that all moral and practical wisdom was contained in the Books of Thoth-Hermes Trismegistus. Thoth means a college, school, or assembly, and the works of that name were identical with the doctrines of the sages of the far East. Thoth-Hermes, therefore, never was the name of a man, but a generic title. It is the Voice of Egypt’s Great Hierophants that speaks. Even in the time of Plato, Hermes was already identified with the Thoth of the Egyptians. But in reality Thoth-Hermes is simply the personification of the sacred teachings of Egypt’s sacerdotal caste. The first hour for the disappearance of the Mysteries struck on the clock of the Races with the Macedonian Conqueror. The Adepts of Egypt were then compelled to recede further and further from the laurels of conquest into the most hidden spots of the globe. And her sacred Scribes and Hierophants became wanderers upon the face of the earth. A dire prophecy about today’s Egypt, from a passage from the Asclepian Dialogue ascribed to Hermes Trismegistus. “Egypt shall be forsaken when divinity returns back from earth to heaven.”
Categories: Religion

The Ancient Egyptian City of Thebes

The Ancient Egyptian City of Thebes

The Ancient Egyptian City of Thebes: The History and Legacy of the Capital that Became Luxor examines the history of the city and examines the architecture of the ancient Egyptian capital.

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN: 1515036820

Category:

Page: 58

View: 399

*Includes pictures *Describes the history of the city and the layout of its famous temple complexes *Includes footnotes, online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents "Let [Agamemnon] offer me the wealth...of Egyptian Thebes, the richest city in the whole world...which has a hundred gates through each of which two hundred may drive at once with their chariots and horses...but not even so shall he move me." - Homer, The Iliad Africa may have given rise to the first humans, and Egypt probably gave rise to the first great civilizations, which continue to fascinate modern societies across the globe nearly 5,000 years later. From the Library and Lighthouse of Alexandria to the Great Pyramid at Giza, the Ancient Egyptians produced several wonders of the world, revolutionized architecture and construction, created some of the world's first systems of mathematics and medicine, and established language and art that spread across the known world. With world-famous leaders like King Tut and Cleopatra, it's no wonder that today's world has so many Egyptologists. In just a few lines of his renowned Iliad, Homer immortalized in writing what the Thebans had immortalized in stone nearly a millennium before - Thebes "of the Hundred Gates" was home to some of the most splendid relics of the religion, history, and art of ancient Egypt and indeed of all the ancient world. As Thebes grew from an unimportant settlement to the richest city in the ancient world, unparalleled in its beauty and splendor, nearly all of its leaders left his or her mark in the form of one or more legendary monuments at the great temple complex to Amun-Ra at Karnak, the temple to Amun-Ra at Luxor, and the mortuary temples and tombs of the Valley of the Kings. As Thebes underwent the dramatic changes that came with its 3,000 years of political shifts, religious reforms, and ritual changes - not to mention its sometimes abrupt changes in fortune - its monuments grew and changed with it. The study of the fascinating archaeology of these sprawling structures thus provides an excellent point of entry for understanding nearly all aspects of Theban history and culture. The Ancient Egyptian City of Thebes: The History and Legacy of the Capital that Became Luxor examines the history of the city and examines the architecture of the ancient Egyptian capital. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about Thebes like never before, in no time at all.
Categories:

The Ancient Egyptian City of Thebes

The Ancient Egyptian City of Thebes

The Ancient Egyptian City of Thebes: The History and Legacy of the Capital that Became Luxor examines the history of the city and examines the architecture of the ancient Egyptian capital.

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1985003198

Category:

Page: 90

View: 113

*Includes pictures *Describes the history of the city and the layout of its famous temple complexes *Includes footnotes, online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents "Let [Agamemnon] offer me the wealth...of Egyptian Thebes, the richest city in the whole world...which has a hundred gates through each of which two hundred may drive at once with their chariots and horses...but not even so shall he move me." - Homer, The Iliad Africa may have given rise to the first humans, and Egypt probably gave rise to the first great civilizations, which continue to fascinate modern societies across the globe nearly 5,000 years later. From the Library and Lighthouse of Alexandria to the Great Pyramid at Giza, the Ancient Egyptians produced several wonders of the world, revolutionized architecture and construction, created some of the world's first systems of mathematics and medicine, and established language and art that spread across the known world. With world-famous leaders like King Tut and Cleopatra, it's no wonder that today's world has so many Egyptologists. In just a few lines of his renowned Iliad, Homer immortalized in writing what the Thebans had immortalized in stone nearly a millennium before - Thebes "of the Hundred Gates" was home to some of the most splendid relics of the religion, history, and art of ancient Egypt and indeed of all the ancient world. As Thebes grew from an unimportant settlement to the richest city in the ancient world, unparalleled in its beauty and splendor, nearly all of its leaders left his or her mark in the form of one or more legendary monuments at the great temple complex to Amun-Ra at Karnak, the temple to Amun-Ra at Luxor, and the mortuary temples and tombs of the Valley of the Kings. As Thebes underwent the dramatic changes that came with its 3,000 years of political shifts, religious reforms, and ritual changes - not to mention its sometimes abrupt changes in fortune - its monuments grew and changed with it. The study of the fascinating archaeology of these sprawling structures thus provides an excellent point of entry for understanding nearly all aspects of Theban history and culture. The Ancient Egyptian City of Thebes: The History and Legacy of the Capital that Became Luxor examines the history of the city and examines the architecture of the ancient Egyptian capital. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about Thebes like never before, in no time at all.
Categories:

Following Osiris

Following Osiris

EgyptTemple of the Whole World/Ägypten —Tempel der gesamten Welt (Leiden and Boston, 2003), pp. 96–104, 106–7, and 110; D. Luft, OsirisHymnen: Wechselnde ...

Author: Mark Smith

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191089763

Category: History

Page: 704

View: 766

Osiris, god of the dead, was one of ancient Egypt's most important deities. The earliest secure evidence for belief in him dates back to the fifth dynasty (c.2494-2345BC), but he continued to be worshipped until the fifth century AD. Following Osiris is concerned with ancient Egyptian conceptions of the relationship between Osiris and the deceased, or what might be called the Osirian afterlife, asking what the nature of this relationship was and what the prerequisites were for enjoying its benefits. It does not seek to provide a continuous or comprehensive account of Egyptian ideas on this subject, but rather focuses on five distinct periods in their development, spread over four millennia. The periods in question are ones in which significant changes in Egyptian ideas about Osiris and the dead are known to have occurred or where it has been argued that they did, as Egyptian aspirations for the Osirian afterlife took time to coalesce and reach their fullest form of expression. An important aim of the book is to investigate when and why such changes happened, treating religious belief as a dynamic rather than a static phenomenon and tracing the key stages in the development of these aspirations, from their origin to their demise, while illustrating how they are reflected in the textual and archaeological records. In doing so, it opens up broader issues for exploration and draws meaningful cross-cultural comparisons to ask, for instance, how different societies regard death and the dead, why people convert from one religion to another, and why they abandon belief in a god or gods altogether.
Categories: History

Marvelous Wonders of the Whole World

Marvelous Wonders of the Whole World

... Munza Ascending the Nile - Near the Pyramids Ancient Egyptian Temple . General View of the Great Pyramids of Egypt Embalming the Body of an Egyptian ...

Author: Henry Davenport Northrop

Publisher:

ISBN: UCSD:31822043191949

Category: Curiosities and wonders

Page: 864

View: 498

Categories: Curiosities and wonders

The Story of Egypt

The Story of Egypt

The story of the world's greatest civilisation spans more than 4000 years of history that has shaped the world.

Author: Joann Fletcher

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781444785159

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 891

The story of the world's greatest civilisation spans more than 4000 years of history that has shaped the world. It is full of spectacular sites and epic stories, an evolving society rich in heroes and villains, inventors and intellectuals, artisans and pioneers. Now Professor Joann Fletcher pulls together the complete Story of Egypt - charting the rise and fall of the ancient Egyptians while putting their whole world into a context that we can all relate to. Joann Fletcher uncovers some fascinating revelations, from Egypt's oldest art to the beginnings of mummification almost two thousand years earlier than previously believed. She also looks at the women who became pharaohs on at least 10 occasions, and the evidence that the Egyptians built the first Suez Canal, circumnavigated Africa and won victories at the original Olympic games. From Ramses II's penchant for dying his greying hair to how we know Montuhotep's wife bit her nails and the farmer Baki liked eating in bed, Joann Fletcher brings alive the history and people of ancient Egypt as nobody else can.
Categories: History

Cultural Memory and Early Civilization

Cultural Memory and Early Civilization

In Egypt, too, the development of distinctive identity enhancement ... EgyptTemple ofthe [Whole World (Leiden: Brill, 2003), Al1—5744 The concept of a ...

Author: Jan Assmann

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139498487

Category: History

Page:

View: 541

Now available to an English-speaking audience, this book presents a groundbreaking theoretical analysis of memory, identity and culture. It investigates how cultures remember, arguing that human memory exists and is communicated in two ways, namely inter-human interaction and in external systems of notation, such as writing, which can span generations. Dr Assmann defines two theoretical concepts of cultural memory, differentiating between the long-term memory of societies, which can span up to 3,000 years, and communicative memory, which is typically restricted to 80 to 100 years. He applies this theoretical framework to case studies of four specific cultures, illustrating the function contexts and specific achievements, including the state, international law, religion and science. Ultimately, his research demonstrates that memory is not simply a means of retaining information, but rather a force that can shape cultural identity and allow cultures to respond creatively to both daily challenges and catastrophic changes.
Categories: History

Invoking the Egyptian Gods

Invoking the Egyptian Gods

According to the ancient Egyptians, this land was the temple of the whole world where the gods came down to walk with man. It should be pointed out that, ...

Author: Judith Page

Publisher: Llewellyn Worldwide

ISBN: 9780738730264

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 288

View: 767

Delve into the powerful undercurrents of Egyptian magick and be forever changed. This book presents authentic rituals to invoke the gods. Step into their hidden realm, where true gnosis and healing are found. A deeply spiritual experience unfolds as you begin to invoke the deities of ancient Egypt. Discover your true magickal name, create a doorway into other dimensions, receive messages from the Neteru, and become one with the gods once again. —Call upon Isis for boundless love —Invoke the warrior goddess Sekhmet for protection —Summon Nut to unleash your creativity —Reconnect with Hathor, Osiris, and many other gods and goddesses Combining elegant rites with an evocative description of each deity’s myths, this book invites you to begin a soul-level transformation and awaken to your own strength, power, and divinity.
Categories: Body, Mind & Spirit

Cult and Ritual in Persian Period Egypt

Cult and Ritual in Persian Period Egypt

This book focuses on the decorative schemes of several chapels in the earlier part of the temple, chapels that were either established and/or were decorated during the first Persian Period (525-404 BCE).

Author: Fatma Talaat Ismail

Publisher: ISD LLC

ISBN: 9781950343119

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 592

Ancient Egyptian temple walls expressed royal and political ideologies, reflected the ancient Egyptian secular and spiritual world order, supplied a medium for the reenactments of assorted myths, and implied a metaphor for the universe. The Temple of Hibis is one of the most important temples from Late Period Egypt. Despite the conventional overall architecture plan of the temple, it exhibits numerous particularities. While the more prominent parts of the temple, such as the sanctuary, have been studied by numerous scholars, in other areas the decoration schemes remain largely unexplained. This book focuses on the decorative schemes of several chapels in the earlier part of the temple, chapels that were either established and/or were decorated during the first Persian Period (525-404 BCE). These chapels were located around the main sanctuary A, but have rarely been the subject of scholarly discussions. It concentrates on a few chapels of the Temple of Hibis: chapels F and G to the south of sanctuary A on the first level of the temple and all the decorated chapels, E1, E2, H1, and H2, on the second level of the temple. Each chapter begins with a brief description of the scenes and their basic layout and a complete translation of the accompanying texts. A more in-depth analysis regarding both text and image follows in the commentary. It includes the analysis of the different aspects of the gods, their origins, and the development of their cults that are significant to the scenes and to each other. Also discussed are their coherence, any aspects that are especially emphasized, and any other information that could be gleaned from the whole scene. The analysis tries to detail the specific composition that makes up the mosaic of the picture, wall, or room. Attention is paid to both the scenic arrangement and the hieroglyphic inscriptions, as the interpretation of one would be meaningless without the other. Attention is given to investigating the general function of the different rooms by means of their decoration and by identifying the patterns or important themes generated by the layout of the scenes. The results are summarized in the last chapter. A number of line drawings have been inserted into the text beside a described scene as an aid to the reader.
Categories: History

A Companion to Ancient Egypt 2 Volume Set

A Companion to Ancient Egypt  2 Volume Set

EgyptTemple of the Whole World. Studies in Honour of Jan Assmann. Leiden and Boston: 137–51. Hikade, Th. 2008. Does burning make stone tools special?

Author: Alan B. Lloyd

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781444320060

Category: History

Page: 1352

View: 945

This companion provides the very latest accounts of the major and current aspects of Egyptology by leading scholars. Delivered in a highly readable style and extensively illustrated, it offers unprecedented breadth and depth of coverage, giving full scope to the discussion of this incredible civilization. Provides the very latest and, where relevant, well-illustrated accounts of the major aspects of Egypt?s ancient history and culture Covers a broad scope of topics including physical context, history, economic and social mechanisms, language, literature, and the visual arts Delivered in a highly readable style with students and scholars of both Egyptology and Graeco-Roman studies in mind Provides a chronological table at the start of each volume to help readers orient chapters within the wider historical context
Categories: History

Coptic Egypt

Coptic Egypt

Discover simple Truths and Bible information that you always wanted to know but had never the chance to read anywhere else.

Author: Laila Fares

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN: 9780595302499

Category: History

Page: 76

View: 714

Discover simple Truths and Bible information that you always wanted to know but had never the chance to read anywhere else. Learn how the oldest and the youngest countries in the world, Egypt and the United States, share in common some same exact historical events. Meet with some of the greatest personalities in the world and in history: hear them speaking in an uncovered setting sitting and standing on the very values that are most needed by our world today. Follow closely the path of peace in the Middle-East; understand the beliefs and spiritual motivations behind the behavior impacting this region of the world.
Categories: History

Studien zur Alt gyptischen Kultur Band 36

Studien zur Alt  gyptischen Kultur Band 36

EgyptTemple of the Whole World , Fs Jan Assmann , Studies in the history of religions 97 , 2003 , 319–365 , dort 358. Am Versende dürfte mi p } wt ( so ...

Author: Hartwig Altenmüller

Publisher: Helmut Buske Verlag

ISBN: 9783875489361

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 902

Inhalt: Altenmüller, Hartwig: Das Fragment einer Mumienbinde im Museum für Völkerkunde in Hamburg. Bommas, Martin: Das Motiv der Sonnenstrahlen auf der Brust des Toten: Zur Frage der Stundenwachen im Alten Reich. Daoud, Khaled: Notes on the Tomb of Niankhnesut, Part I: Reliefs and Inscriptions. Gulyás, András: The Osirid Pillars and the Renewal of Ramesses III at Karnak. Jansen-Winkeln, Karl: Drei Statueninschriften einer Familie aus frühptolemäischer Zeit. Kahl, Jochem / El-Khadragy, Mahmoud / Verhoeven, Ursula with a contribution by Monika Zöller: The Asyut Project: Fourth season of fieldwork (2006). El-Khadragy, Mahmoud: Some Significant Features in the Decoration of the Chapel of Iti-ibi-iqer at Asyut. Koemoth, Pierre P.: L'Atoum-serpent magicien de la stèle Metternich. Lieven, Alexandra von: Im Schatten des Goldhauses: Berufsgeheimnis und Handwerkerinitiation im Alten Ägypten. Luiselli, Maria Michela: Religion und Literatur. Überlegungen zur Funktion der ""persönlichen Frömmigkeit"" in der Literatur des Mittleren und Neuen Reiches. Nuzzolo, Massimiliano: The Sun Temples of the V Dynasty: A new analysis. Quack, Joachim Friedrich: Die Initiation zum Schreiberberuf im Alten Ägypten. Schukraft, Beate: Homosexualität im Alten Ägypten. Vasiljevic, Vera: Der Grabherr und seine Frau. Zur Ikonographie der Status- und Machtverhältnisse in den Privatgräbern des Alten Reiches. Wada, Koichiro: Provincial Society and Cemetery Organization in the New Kingdom. Zibelius-Chen, Karola: Die Medja in altägyptischen Quellen.
Categories: History

An Introduction to the Archaeology of Ancient Egypt

An Introduction to the Archaeology of Ancient Egypt

EgyptTemple of the Whole World: Studies in Honour of Jan Assmann. New York: Brill. 137–152. Hikade, T., G. Pyke, and D. O'Neill. 2008.

Author: Kathryn A. Bard

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118896112

Category: Social Science

Page: 480

View: 713

This student-friendly introduction to the archaeology of ancient Egypt guides readers from the Paleolithic to the Greco-Roman periods, and has now been updated to include recent discoveries and new illustrations. • Superbly illustrated with photographs, maps, and site plans, with additional illustrations in this new edition • Organized into 11 chapters, covering: the history of Egyptology and Egyptian archaeology; prehistoric and pharaonic chronology and the ancient Egyptian language; geography, resources, and environment; and seven chapters organized chronologically and devoted to specific archaeological sites and evidence • Includes sections on salient topics such as the constructing the Great Pyramid at Giza and the process of mummification
Categories: Social Science

The Egyptian Collection at Norwich Castle Museum

The Egyptian Collection at Norwich Castle Museum

... S., 'Bovines in Egyptian Predynastic and Early Dynastic Iconography', ... in Predynastic Egypt', in Meyer, S. (ed), Egypt: Temple of the whole World: ...

Author: Faye Kalloniatis

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN: 9781789251999

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 753

The Egyptian Collection at Norwich Castle Museum represents the first full publication of this important collection which contains several outstanding objects. Part 1 begins with an outline of the acquisition history of the Egyptian collection and its display within Norwich Castle in 1894, when it was converted from a prison to a museum. The collection was largely acquired between the nineteenth and first part of the twentieth centuries. Its most prominent donor was Flaxman Spurrell, whose varied collection of flints, faience beads and necklaces as well as Late Antique cloths was obtained from Sir Flinders Petrie. Also prominent was the Norwich-based Colman family, most notable for its manufacture of mustard, whose collection was purchased in Egypt during the late-C19. Also included in this part are essays on several of the museum’s outstanding items – Ipu’s shroud, a rare early 18th Dynasty example with fragments also held in Cairo; the 22nd Dynasty finely decorated and well-preserved cartonnage and wooden lid of the priest, Ankh-hor; and the exceptional model granary of Nile clay painted with lively scenes, one showing the owner, Intef, playing senet. Part 2 is a detailed catalogue of the complete collection. It is organised into sections with objects grouped together mainly according to type – stelae, shabtis, scarabs, jewellery, amulets, vessels, flints, lamps, inscribed Book of the Dead fragments, metal figurines, and Late Antique cloths; and also according to function – such as cosmetics& grooming, and architectural & furniture elements. The inscribed materials have all been translated and individual entries give examples or parallels. Seventy colour plates illustrate each object.
Categories: History

Graeco Egyptian Interactions

Graeco Egyptian Interactions

EgyptTemple of the Whole World. Studies in Honour of Jan Assmann [Numen Book Series—Studies in the History of Religion 97] (Leiden, Boston), 319–65.

Author: Ian Rutherford

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199656127

Category:

Page: 400

View: 522

Contact and interaction between Greek and Egyptian culture can be traced in different forms over more than a millennium. Comprising fourteen chapters written by experts in the field, this volume examines this cultural interaction, focusing in particular on literature and textual culture, and covering a wide range of topics such as religion (such as prophecy, hymns, and magic), philosophy, historiography, romance, and translation.
Categories:

Egypt and the Limits of Hellenism

Egypt and the Limits of Hellenism

(1972) Topographical Bibliography of Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphic Texts, ... der memphitischen Isisaretalogie,” in EgyptTemple of the Whole World.

Author: Ian S. Moyer

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139496551

Category: Social Science

Page:

View: 124

In a series of studies, Ian Moyer explores the ancient history and modern historiography of relations between Egypt and Greece from the fifth century BCE to the early Roman empire. Beginning with Herodotus, he analyzes key encounters between Greeks and Egyptian priests, the bearers of Egypt's ancient traditions. Four moments unfold as rich micro-histories of cross-cultural interaction: Herodotus' interviews with priests at Thebes; Manetho's composition of an Egyptian history in Greek; the struggles of Egyptian priests on Delos; and a Greek physician's quest for magic in Egypt. In writing these histories, the author moves beyond Orientalizing representations of the Other and colonial metanarratives of the civilizing process to reveal interactions between Greeks and Egyptians as transactional processes in which the traditions, discourses and pragmatic interests of both sides shaped the outcome. The result is a dialogical history of cultural and intellectual exchanges between the great civilizations of Greece and Egypt.
Categories: Social Science

Isis on the Nile Egyptian Gods in Hellenistic and Roman Egypt

Isis on the Nile  Egyptian Gods in Hellenistic and Roman Egypt

Die Herrin der beiden Länder». Versuch zum demotischen Hintergrund der Memphitischen Isisaretalogie, in : S. Meyer (ed.), Egypt. Temple of the Whole world.

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004210868

Category: Social Science

Page: 394

View: 285

Against the background of questions on cultural identity and memory, this book offers an overview of the development of the cults of Isis in Hellenistic and Roman Egypt, often presenting new or unpublished material.
Categories: Social Science

Temple of the Cosmos

Temple of the Cosmos

In this groundbreaking new guide to the esoteric qualities hidden in the surfaces of ancient Egyptian life, Jeremy Naydler recreates the spiritual life of another time and place.

Author: Jeremy Naydler

Publisher: Inner Traditions / Bear & Co

ISBN: 0892815558

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 421

Recreates the ancient Egyptian sacred path of spiritual unfolding.
Categories: History