Early Modern Women s Letter Writing 1450 1700

Early Modern Women s Letter Writing  1450 1700

This landmark book of essays examines the development of women's letter writing from the late fifteenth to the early eighteen century.

Author: J. Daybell

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230598669

Category: Fiction

Page: 213

View: 968

This landmark book of essays examines the development of women's letter writing from the late fifteenth to the early eighteen century. It is the first book to deal comprehensively with women's letter writing during the Late Medieval and Early Modern period and shows that this was a larger and more socially diversified area of female activity than has generally been assumed. The essays, contributed by many of the leading researchers active in the field, illustrate women's engagement in various activities, both literary and political, social and religious.
Categories: Fiction

The Material Letter in Early Modern England

The Material Letter in Early Modern England

Daybell examines a crucial period in the development of the English vernacular letter before Charles I's postal reforms in 1635, one that witnessed a significant extension of letter-writing skills throughout society.

Author: J. Daybell

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137006066

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 357

View: 181

The first major socio-cultural study of manuscript letters and letter-writing practices in early modern England. Daybell examines a crucial period in the development of the English vernacular letter before Charles I's postal reforms in 1635, one that witnessed a significant extension of letter-writing skills throughout society.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Women Letter Writers in Tudor England

Women Letter Writers in Tudor England

This book represents the most comprehensive study of women's letters and letter-writing during the early modern period so far undertaken, and acts as an important corrective to traditional ways of reading and discussing letters as private, ...

Author: James Daybell

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192566683

Category: History

Page: 351

View: 710

Women Letter-Writers in Tudor England represents one of the most comprehensive study of women's letters and letter-writing during the early modern period to be undertaken, and acts as an important corrective to traditional ways of reading and discussing letters as private, elite, male, and non-political. Based on over 3,000 manuscript letters, it shows that letter-writing was a larger and more socially diversified area of female activity than has been hitherto assumed. In that letters constitute the largest body of extant sixteenth-century women's writing, the book initiates a reassessment of women's education and literacy in the period. As indicators of literacy, letters yield physical evidence of rudimentary writing activity and abilities, document 'higher' forms of female literacy, and highlight women's mastery of formal rhetorical and epistolary conventions. Women Letter-Writers in Tudor England also stresses that letters are unparalleled as intimate and immediate records of family relationships, and as media for personal and self-reflective forms of female expression. Read as documents that inscribe social and gender relations, letters shed light on the complex range of women's personal relationships, as female power and authority fluctuated, negotiated on an individual basis. Furthermore, correspondence highlights the important political roles played by early modern women. Female letter-writers were integral in cultivating and maintaining patronage and kinship networks; they were active as suitors for crown favour, and operated as political intermediaries and patrons in their own right, using letters to elicit influence. Letters thus help to locate differing forms of female power within the family, locality and occasionally on the wider political stage, and offer invaluable primary evidence from which to reconstruct the lives of early modern women.
Categories: History

Women and Epistolary Agency in Early Modern Culture 1450 1690

Women and Epistolary Agency in Early Modern Culture  1450   1690

17 18 19 20 2001); Jane Couchman and Ann Crabb (eds), Women's Letters Across Europe, 1400– 1700 (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2005); Caroline ... See also, James Daybell, 'Women's Letters', in Cambridge Companion to Early Modern Women's Writing, ...

Author: James Daybell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134771912

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 258

View: 960

Women and Epistolary Agency in Early Modern Culture, 1450–1690 is the first collection to examine the gendered nature of women’s letter-writing in England and Ireland from the late-fifteenth century through to the Restoration. The essays collected here represent an important body of new work by a group of international scholars who together look to reorient the study of women’s letters in the contexts of early modern culture. The volume builds upon recent approaches to the letter, both rhetorical and material, that have the power to transform the ways in which we understand, study and situate early modern women’s letter-writing, challenging misconceptions of women’s letters as intrinsically private, domestic and apolitical. The essays in the volume embrace a range of interdisciplinary approaches: historical, literary, palaeographic, linguistic, material and gender-based. Contributors deal with a variety of issues related to early modern women’s correspondence in England and Ireland. These include women’s rhetorical and persuasive skills and the importance of gendered epistolary strategies; gender and the materiality of the letter as a physical form; female agency, education, knowledge and power; epistolary networks and communication technologies. In this volume, the study of women’s letters is not confined to writings by women; contributors here examine not only the collaborative nature of some letter-writing but also explore how men addressed women in their correspondence as well as some rich examples of how women were constructed in and through the letters of men. As a whole, the book stands as a valuable reassessment of the complex gendered nature of early modern women’s correspondence.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Cambridge Companion to Early Modern Women s Writing

The Cambridge Companion to Early Modern Women s Writing

IO. II. I2. 13. NOTES .James Daybell (ed.), Early Modern Women's Letter Writing, 1450-1700 (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2001 . James Daybell, 'Recent Studies in Sixteenth—Century Letters', English Literary Renaissance 3 5.2 (2005), 331-62, ...

Author: Laura Lunger Knoppers

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521885270

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 306

View: 210

Ideal for courses, this Companion examines the range, historical importance, and aesthetic merit of women's writing in Britain, 1500-1700.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Material Letter in Early Modern England

The Material Letter in Early Modern England

Couchman and Anne Crabb (eds) Women's Letters Across Europe, 1400–1700: Form and Persuasion (Aldershot: Ashgate), pp.143–61. ... Early Modern Women's Letter-Writing in England, 1450–170 (Basingstoke: Palgrave), pp.59–76.

Author: J. Daybell

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137006066

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 357

View: 105

The first major socio-cultural study of manuscript letters and letter-writing practices in early modern England. Daybell examines a crucial period in the development of the English vernacular letter before Charles I's postal reforms in 1635, one that witnessed a significant extension of letter-writing skills throughout society.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Reading Early Modern Women

Reading Early Modern Women

See Margaret J.M.Ezell, The Patriarch's Wife: Literary Evidence and the History of the Family (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1987), 65. 3. James Daybell, “Introduction,” Early Modern Women's Letter Writing, 14501700, ...

Author: Helen Ostovich

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135887698

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 544

View: 293

Much has been written about women of the English Renaissance, but few examples of women's writing from that era have been readily available until now. This remarkable anthology assembles for the first time 144 primary texts and documents written by women between 1550 and 1700 and reveals an unprecedented view of the intellectual and literary lives of women in early modern England. The writings range from poetry to philosophical treatises, addressing a wide array of subjects including law, gender, education, motherhood, medicine, religion, life-writing, and the arts. Each selection is paired with a beautifully reproduced facsimile of the text's original source manuscript, allowing a glimpse into the literary past that will lead the reader to truly appreciate the care and craft with which these women writers prepared their texts. This essential anthology is a captivating guide to the legacy of early modern women's literature and its authors that must not be overlooked.
Categories: Literary Collections

Women Writing and Language in Early Modern Ireland

Women  Writing  and Language in Early Modern Ireland

Contemporary letter-writers were aided by Erasmus' influential De scribendis epistolis (1521) and its sixteenth-century English adaptation, ... Early Modern Women's Letter-Writing, 14501700 (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2001), 53.

Author: Marie-Louise Coolahan

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191573248

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 304

View: 216

This book examines writing in English, Irish, and Spanish by women living in Ireland and by Irish women living on the continent between the years 1574 and 1676. This was a tumultuous period of political, religious, and linguistic contestation that encompassed the key power struggles of early modern Ireland. This study brings to light the ways in which women contributed; they strove to be heard and to make sense of their situations, forging space for their voices in complex ways and engaging with native and new language-traditions. The book investigates the genres in which women wrote: poetry, nuns' writing, petition-letters, depositions, biography and autobiography. It argues for a complex understanding of authorial agency that centres of the act of creating or composing a text, which does not necessarily equate with the physical act of writing. The Irish, English, and European contexts for women's production of texts are identified and assessed. The literary traditions and languages of the different communities living on the island are juxtaposed in order to show how identities were shaped and defined in relation to each other. Marie-Louise Coolahan elucidates the social, political, and economic imperatives for women's writing, examines the ways in which women characterized female composition, and describes an extensive range of cross-cultural, multilingual activity.
Categories: Literary Collections

Material Readings of Early Modern Culture

Material Readings of Early Modern Culture

This book explores the significance of the physicality of manuscripts and printed early modern texts.

Author: J. Daybell

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 0230223524

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 184

This book explores the significance of the physicality of manuscripts and printed early modern texts. Focusing on the material aspects and social practices of texts as a new way of reading meaning, it reassesses the developing relationships between cultures of manuscript and print from the late sixteenth to early eighteenth century.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Women s Life Writing and Early Modern Ireland

Women s Life Writing and Early Modern Ireland

... Daybell's extensive work on early modern women's letters —including Women Letter-Writers in Tudor England (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006); Daybell, ed., Early Modern Women's Letter Writing, 14501700 (Basingstoke: Palgrave, ...

Author: Julie A. Eckerle

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9781496214263

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 348

View: 941

Women's Life Writing and Early Modern Ireland provides an original perspective on both new and familiar texts in this first critical collection to focus on seventeenth-century women's life writing in a specifically Irish context. By shifting the focus away from England--even though many of these writers would have identified themselves as English--and making Ireland and Irishness the focus of their essays, the contributors resituate women's narratives in a powerful and revealing landscape. This volume addresses a range of genres, from letters to book marginalia, and a number of different women, from now-canonical life writers such as Mary Rich and Ann Fanshawe to far less familiar figures such as Eliza Blennerhassett and the correspondents and supplicants of William King, archbishop of Dublin. The writings of the Boyle sisters and the Duchess of Ormonde--women from the two most important families in seventeenth-century Ireland--also receive a thorough analysis. These innovative and nuanced scholarly considerations of the powerful influence of Ireland on these writers' construction of self, provide fresh, illuminating insights into both their writing and their broader cultural context.
Categories: Literary Collections