The Drunkard s Progress

The Drunkard s Progress

... and where every luxury and enjoyment which wealth could purchase awaited them ; -- and here let us pause for the present ere we pursue the narrative of the DRUNKARD'S PROGRESS . ! END OF THE FIRST PERIOD , THE DRUNKARD'S PROGRESS .

Author: George William MacArthur Reynolds

Publisher:

ISBN: BL:A0017460614

Category: Alcoholism

Page: 174

View: 288

Categories: Alcoholism

The Drunkard s Progress

The Drunkard s Progress

Our method has also this great advantage over its rival — it enables the drunkard to see himself . ... loathe and fear the drunkard's cup , and the drunkard's company . a the Elies , son ble . bers . ning his 10 THE DRUNKARD'S PROGRESS .

Author: William Arnot

Publisher:

ISBN: OXFORD:N10828843

Category: Alcoholism

Page: 64

View: 463

Categories: Alcoholism

The Drunkard s Progress Being a Panorama of the Overland Route from the Station at Drouth to the General Terminus in the Dead Sea in a Series of Thirteen Views Drawn and Engraved by John Adam the Descriptions Given by John Bunyan Junior

The Drunkard s Progress  Being a Panorama of the Overland Route from the Station at Drouth  to the General Terminus in the Dead Sea  in a Series of Thirteen Views  Drawn and Engraved by John Adam  the Descriptions Given by John Bunyan  Junior

Boys ! look on this picture ; and , if you want to be men , loathe and fear the drunkard's cup , and the drunkard's company . a a 1 II . COMMUNICATIVE . II .-- COMMUNICATIVE , “ 10 THE DRUNKARD'S PROGRESS ,

Author: William Arnot

Publisher:

ISBN: BL:A0025028773

Category:

Page: 68

View: 957

Categories:

Drunkard s Progress

Drunkard s Progress

The most important temperance narrative is John B. Gough's Autobiography , and my long excerpt from it dominates Drunkard's Progress , just as Gough himself commanded the Washingtonian lecture circuit . Temperance narratives tend to ...

Author: John W. Crowley

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: STANFORD:36105022957067

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 230

View: 524

"Twelve-step" recovery programs for a wide variety of addictive behaviors have become tremendously popular in the 1990s. According to John W. Crowley, the origin of these movements—including Alcoholics Anonymous—lies in the Washingtonian Temperance Society, founded in Baltimore in the 1840s. In lectures, pamphlets, and books (most notably John B. Gough's Autobiography, published in 1845), recovering "drunkards" described their enslavement to and liberation from alcohol. Though widely circulated in their time, these influential temperance narratives have been largely forgotten. In Drunkard's Progress, Crowley presents a collection of revealing excerpts from these texts along with his own introductions. The tales, including "The Experience Meeting," from T. S. Arthur's Six Nights with the Washingtonians (1842), and the autobiographical Narrative of Charles T. Woodman, A Reformed Inebriate (1843), still speak with suprising force to the miseries of drunkenness and the joys of deliverance. Contemporary readers familiar with twelve-step programs, Crowley notes, will feel a shock of recognition as they relate to the experience, strength, and hope of these old-time—but nonetheless timely—narratives of addiction, despair, and recovery. "I arose, reached the door in safety, and, passing the entry, entered my own room and closed the door after me. To my amazement the chairs were engaged in chasing the tables round the room; to my eye the bed appeared to be stationary and neutral, and I resolved to make it my ally; I thought it would be safest to run, as by that means I should reach it sooner, but in the attempt I found myself instantly prostrate on the floor . . . How long I slept I know not; but when I awoke I was still on the floor, and alone . . . I have since been through all the heights, and depths, and labyrinths of misery; but never, no never, have I felt again the unutterable agony of that moment. I wept, I groaned, I actually tore my hair; I did every thing but the one thing that could have saved me."—from Confessions of a Female Inebriate, excerpted in Drunkard's Progress
Categories: Juvenile Nonfiction

Imitations of Life

Imitations of Life

... Michael R. Booth , “ The Drunkard's Progress : Nineteenth - Century Temperance Drama , ” Dalhousie Review 44 , no . ... 1964 ) , 28–29 ; and Jeffery D. Mason , “ The Drunkard ( 1844 ) and the Temperance Movement , ” in his Melodrama ...

Author: Louise McReynolds

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822327902

Category: Drama

Page: 358

View: 547

DIVUses the under-studied genre of melodrama as a critical prism for understanding Russian/Soviet history, politics and culture--in particular, the uses to which popular culture was put in the Soviet period./div
Categories: Drama

Manhood Lost

Manhood Lost

Fallen Drunkards and Redeeming Women in the Nineteenth-Century United States Elaine Frantz Parsons ... John W. Crowley, Drunkard's Progress: Narratives of Addiction, Despair, and Recovery (Baltimore, Md.: Johns Hopkins University Press, ...

Author: Elaine Frantz Parsons

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9781421401690

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 769

Entering a distinctively male space—the saloon—to rescue fathers, brothers, and sons, women at the same time began to enter another male bastion—politics—again justifying their transgression in terms of rescuing the nation's manhood.
Categories: History

Charles Dickens and His Original Illustrators

Charles Dickens and His Original Illustrators

Hogarth had never attempted a drunkard's progress, Dickens speculated, because he perceived that "the causes of drunkenness among the poor were so numerous and widespread, and lurked so sorrowfully deep and far down in all human misery, ...

Author: Jane R. Cohen

Publisher: Ohio State University Press

ISBN: 9780814202845

Category: Illustration of books

Page: 330

View: 829

Categories: Illustration of books

Drunkard s Refuge

Drunkard s Refuge

Drunkard's Progress: Narratives of Addiction, Despair, and Recovery. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999. Davis, N. S. "Inebriate Asylums: The Principles That Should Govern Us in the Treatment of Inebriates and the ...

Author: John William Crowley

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: UOM:39015058128540

Category: Psychology

Page: 127

View: 731

Opened during the Civil War in 1864, the New York State Inebriate Asylum in Binghampton was the first medically directed addiction treatment centre in the US. This book provides a lively account of this pioneering facility and its charismatic founder, Dr Joseph Edward Turner.
Categories: Psychology

Global Temperance and the Balkans

Global Temperance and the Balkans

An aggregate image for this came in the classic lithograph by Nathaniel Currier The Drunkard's Progress: From the ... of alcohol even the most hardened drunkard could be reclaimed just like heathen souls were at all times redeemable.

Author: Nikolay Kamenov

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030416447

Category: History

Page: 223

View: 827

This book examines the local manifestation of the global temperance movement in the Balkans. It argues that regional histories of social movements in the modern period could not be sufficiently understood in isolation. Moreover, the book argues that broad transformations of social movements – for example, the power centers associated with moral/religious temperance and the later, scientifically based anti-alcohol campaigns – are more easily identifiable through a detailed regional study. For this purpose, the book begins by sketching the historical development as well as the main historiographical themes surrounding the worldwide temperance movement. The book then zooms in on the movement in the Balkans and Bulgaria in particular. American missionaries founded the temperance movement in the closing decades of the nineteenth century. The interwar period, however, witnessed the proliferation of new, professional organizations. The book discusses the various branches as well as their international and political affiliations, showing that the anti-alcohol reform movement was one of the most important social movements in the region.
Categories: History

The Oppositional Aesthetics of Chartist Fiction

The Oppositional Aesthetics of Chartist Fiction

The driving message of The Drunkard's Progress is that drinking is caused by human weakness and leads inevitably to abject degradation and death. But Reynolds also includes aspects of the story that distances it from typical ...

Author: Rob Breton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317022268

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 166

View: 324

Redressing a gap in Chartism studies, Rob Breton focuses on the fiction that emerged from the movement, placing it in the context of the Victorian novel and reading it against the works aimed at the middle-class. Breton examines works by well-known writers such as Ernest Jones and Thomas Cooper alongside those of obscure or anonymous writers, rejecting the charge that Chartist fiction fails aesthetically, politically, and culturally. Rather, Breton suggests, it constitutes a type of anti-fiction in which the expectations of narrative are revealed as irreconcilable to the real world. Taking up a range of genres, including the historical romance and social-problem story, Breton theorizes the emergence of the fiction against Marxist conceptualizations of cultural hegemony. In situating Chartist fiction in periodical print culture and specific historical moments, this book shows the ways in which it serves as a critique of mainstream Victorian fiction.
Categories: Literary Criticism