Dramatic Action in Greek Tragedy and Noh

Dramatic Action in Greek Tragedy and Noh

Greek tragedy. In other words, in order to compare the Sophoclean and Euripidean tragedies with noh and best determine the parameters of the essential similarities and differences between them, we must focus on these later realistic noh ...

Author: Mae J. Smethurst

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9780739172438

Category: Philosophy

Page: 130

View: 988

By looking at 15th/16th realistic noh and Greek tragedies through the lens of Aristotle and of each other, this comparison reveals a previously unnoticed relationship between the structure of the tragedies and their performance, that is, the involvement of the third actor at the climactic moments of the plot in both and the actor stepping out of character in noh. This observation helps to account for Aristotle’s view that tragedy be limited to three actors.
Categories: Philosophy

A Handbook to the Reception of Greek Drama

A Handbook to the Reception of Greek Drama

Dramatic Action in Greek Tragedy and Noh: Reading with and Beyond Aristotle. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books. Smethurst's volumes both compare Greek tragedy with Noh theater and serve as an excellent introduction, both into comparative ...

Author: Betine van Zyl Smit

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118347751

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 619

View: 203

A Handbook to the Reception of Greek Drama offers a series of original essays that represent a comprehensive overview of the global reception of ancient Greek tragedies and comedies from antiquity to the present day. Represents the first volume to offer a complete overview of the reception of ancient drama from antiquity to the present Covers the translation, transmission, performance, production, and adaptation of Greek tragedy from the time the plays were first created in ancient Athens through the 21st century Features overviews of the history of the reception of Greek drama in most countries of the world Includes chapters covering the reception of Greek drama in modern opera and film
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Materialities of Greek Tragedy

The Materialities of Greek Tragedy

Dramatic Action in Greek Tragedy and Noh: Reading with and beyond Aristotle. Lanham, MD. Smith, S. H. 1984. Masks in Modern Drama. Berkeley. Sobchack, V. 1992. The Address of the Eye: A Phenomenology of Film Experience. Princeton.

Author: Mario Telò

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350028814

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 320

View: 991

Situated within contemporary posthumanism, this volume offers theoretical and practical approaches to materiality in Greek tragedy. Established and emerging scholars explore how works of the three major Greek tragedians problematize objects and affect, providing fresh readings of some of the masterpieces of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. The so-called new materialisms have complemented the study of objects as signifiers or symbols with an interest in their agency and vitality, their sensuous force and psychosomatic impact-and conversely their resistance and irreducible aloofness. At the same time, emotion has been recast as material "affect,†? an intense flow of energies between bodies, animate and inanimate. Powerfully contributing to the current critical debate on materiality, the essays collected here destabilize established interpretations, suggesting alternative approaches and pointing toward a newly robust sense of the physicality of Greek tragedy.
Categories: Literary Collections

Adapting Greek Tragedy

Adapting Greek Tragedy

(2013) Dramatic Action in Greek Tragedy and Noh: Reading With and Beyond Aristotle. Lanham. Smidt, K. (1961) Poetry and Belief in the Work of T. S. Eliot. London. Smith, A. C. H. (1963) T. S. Eliot's Dramatic Theory and Practice: From ...

Author: Vayos Liapis

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781009038744

Category: History

Page:

View: 564

Adaptations of Greek tragedy are increasingly claiming our attention as a dynamic way of engaging with a dramatic genre that flourished in Greece some twenty-five centuries ago but remains as vital as ever. In this volume, fifteen leading scholars and practitioners of the theatre systematically discuss contemporary adaptations of Greek tragedy and explore the challenges and rewards involved therein. Adopting a variety of methodologies, viewpoints and approaches, the volume offers surveys of recent developments in the field, engages with challenging theoretical issues, and shows how adapting Greek tragedy can throw new light on a range of contemporary issues — from our relation to the classical past and our shifting perceptions of ethnic and cultural identities to the place, function and market-value of Greek drama in today's cultural industries. The volume will be welcomed by students and scholars in Classics, Theatre, Drama and Performance Studies, as well as by theatre practitioners.
Categories: History

Reconstructing Satyr Drama

Reconstructing Satyr Drama

Alcestis and the Concept of Prosatyric Drama', in: G.W.M. Harrison (ed.) ... 'Three Problems in the History of Drama', Phoenix 47, 189–212. ... Dramatic Action in Greek Tragedy and Noh: Reading with and beyond Aristotle (Lanham).

Author: Andreas Antonopoulos

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110725230

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 928

View: 312

The origins of satyr drama, and particularly the reliability of the account in Aristotle, remains contested, and several of this volume’s contributions try to make sense of the early relationship of satyr drama to dithyramb and attempt to place satyr drama in the pre-Classical performance space and traditions. What is not contested is the relationship of satyr drama to tragedy as a required cap to the Attic trilogy. Here, however, how Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides (to whom one complete play and the preponderance of the surviving fragments belong) envisioned the relationship of satyr drama to tragedy in plot, structure, setting, stage action and language is a complex subject tackled by several contributors. The playful satyr chorus and the drunken senility of Silenos have always suggested some links to comedy and later to Atellan farce and phlyax. Those links are best examined through language, passages in later Greek and Roman writers, and in art. The purpose of this volume is probe as many themes and connections of satyr drama with other literary genres, as well as other art forms, putting satyr drama on stage from the sixth century BC through the second century AD. The editors and contributors suggest solutions to some of the controversies, but the volume shows as much that the field of study is vibrant and deserves fuller attention.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Dramatic Representations of Filial Piety

Dramatic Representations of Filial Piety

This volume of five noh translations (containing an introduction, translations, short commentaries and a glossary) differs from most others in that none of the plays are of the mugenno type, but are instead genzaino, real-life noh.

Author: Mae J. Smethurst

Publisher: Cornell Univ East Asia Program

ISBN: UCSC:32106014833260

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 196

View: 704

This volume of five noh translations (containing an introduction, translations, short commentaries and a glossary) differs from most others in that none of the plays are of the mugenno type, but are instead genzaino, real-life noh. The plays focus on living characters rather than spirits or ghosts, and on dramatic action rather than poetry, song and dance. In addition the five noh satisfy several of the most important features of Aristotle's definition of good tragedy. That is, they all have plot, which Aristotle says in his Poetics is the imitation of action. The plot centers on characters who are related to each other or are a part of the same household. In each plot, a fatal or harmful event is either enacted or threatened, and there is an unexpected change in the direction of the action. In Shun'ei, a father, visited by his son, is pardoned from a death sentence; in Dampu, a son visits his father, who is then executed, and upon avenging his father's death, unexpectedly escapes the killer's henchmen; in Shichikiochi and Nakamitsu, a son thought to have been killed turns up alive, much to the amazement of his father; and finally, in Nishikido, a brother turns on his own brother and attacks with military force.This volume is intended to provide the reader with a translation of noh plays that either have not been previously translated into English or have not been translated for a long time. The translations are as faithful as possible to the original Japanese so that the reader can gain a close glimpse of the language and action of this particular type of noh. It is a noh filled with action compared to many that have been translated, a noh that appealed to the public at large during the medieval period. Bibliography and scholarly notes are kept to a minimum.
Categories: Foreign Language Study

Brill s Companion to Euripides 2 vols

Brill s Companion to Euripides  2 vols

winner of the Hitomi Arisawa Prize, Dramatic Representations of Filial Piety (1998) winner of the US-Japan Friendship Commission's translation prize, and most recently, Dramatic Action in Greek Tragedy and Noh: Reading with and beyond ...

Author: Andreas Markantonatos

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004435353

Category: History

Page: 1227

View: 140

Brill’s Companion to Euripides, as well as presenting a comprehensive and authoritative guide to understanding Euripides and his masterworks, provides scholars and students with compelling fresh perspectives upon a broad range of issues in the field of Euripidean studies.
Categories: History

Like Clouds or Mists

Like Clouds or Mists

J. Thomas Rimer is Professor Emeritus of Japanese Literature and Theatre at the University of Pittsburgh. ... Her Dramatic Action in Greek Tragedy and Noh: Reading with and Beyond Aristotle(2013) is from Lexington ...

Author: Elizabeth A. Oyler

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9781942242598

Category: Drama

Page: 562

View: 400

Categories: Drama

The Tragedy of the Athenian Ideal in Thucydides and Plato

The Tragedy of the Athenian Ideal in Thucydides and Plato

... by John T. Hogan Black Ships and Sea Raiders: The Late Bronze and Early Iron Age Context of Odysseus' Second Cretan Lie, by Jeffrey P. Emanuel Dramatic Action in Greek Tragedy and Noh: Reading with and beyond Aristotle, ...

Author: John T. Hogan

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9781498596312

Category: Philosophy

Page: 375

View: 965

John T. Hogan’s The Tragedy of the Athenian Ideal in Thucydides and Plato assesses the roles of Pericles, Alcibiades, and Nicias in Athens’ defeat in Thucydides’ Peloponnesian War. Comparing Thucydides’ presentation of political leadership with ideas in Plato’s Statesman as well as Laches, Charmides, Meno, Symposium, Republic, Phaedo, Sophist, and Laws, it concludes that Plato and Thucydides reveal Pericles as lacking the political discipline (sophrosune) to plan a successful war against Sparta. Hogan argues that in his presentation of the collapse in the Corcyraean revolution of moral standards in political discourse, Thucydides shows how revolution destroys the morality implied in basic personal and political language. This reveals a general collapse in underlying prudential measurements needed for sound moral judgment. Furthermore, Hogan argues that the Statesman’s outline of the political leader serves as a paradigm for understanding the weaknesses of Pericles, Alcibiades, and Nicias in terms that parallel Thucydides’ direct and implied conclusions, which in Pericles’ case he highlights with dramatic irony. Hogan shows that Pericles failed both to develop a sufficiently robust practice of Athenian democratic rule and to set up a viable system for succession.
Categories: Philosophy

Black Ships and Sea Raiders

Black Ships and Sea Raiders

Recent titles in the series are: Dramatic Action in Greek Tragedy and Noh: Reading with and beyond Aristotle, by Mae J. Smethurst Greek Heroes in and out of Hades, by Stamatia Dova Becoming Achilles: Child-sacrifice, War, and Misrule in ...

Author: Jeffrey P. Emanuel

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9781498572224

Category: Philosophy

Page: 228

View: 399

The end of the Bronze Age in the Eastern Mediterranean was a time of social, political, and economic upheaval – conditions reflected, in many ways, in the world of Homer’s Odyssey. Jeffrey P. Emanuel examines the Odyssey’s Second Cretan Lie (xiv 191 – 359) in the context of this watershed transition, with particular emphasis on raiding, warfare, maritime technology and tactics, and the evidence for the so-called ‘Sea Peoples’ who have been connected to the events of this period. He focuses in particular on the hero’s description of his frequent raiding activities and on his subsequent sojourn in the land of the pharaohs, and connections between Odysseus’ false narrative and the historical experiences of one particular Sea Peoples group: the ‘Sherden of the Sea.’
Categories: Philosophy