Dominance Without Hegemony

Dominance Without Hegemony

Thus the colonial state, as Guha defines it in this closely argued work, was a paradox--a dominance without hegemony. Dominance without Hegemony had a nationalist aspect as well.

Author: Ranajit Guha

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 067421482X

Category: History

Page: 245

View: 413

What is colonialism and what is a colonial state? Ranajit Guha points out that the colonial state in South Asia was fundamentally different from the metropolitan bourgeois state which sired it. The metropolitan state was hegemonic in character, and its claim to dominance was based on a power relation in which persuasion outweighed coercion. Conversely, the colonial state was non-hegemonic, and in its structure of dominance coercion was paramount. Indeed, the originality of the South Asian colonial state lay precisely in this difference: a historical paradox, it was an autocracy set up and sustained in the East by the foremost democracy of the Western world. It was not possible for that non-hegemonic state to assimilate the civil society of the colonized to itself. Thus the colonial state, as Guha defines it in this closely argued work, was a paradox--a dominance without hegemony. Dominance without Hegemony had a nationalist aspect as well. This arose from a structural split between the elite and subaltern domains of politics, and the consequent failure of the Indian bourgeoisie to integrate vast areas of the life and consciousness of the people into an alternative hegemony. That predicament is discussed in terms of the nationalist project of anticipating power by mobilizing the masses and producing an alternative historiography. In both endeavors the elite claimed to speak for the people constituted as a nation and sought to challenge the pretensions of an alien regime to represent the colonized. A rivalry between an aspirant to power and its incumbent, this was in essence a contest for hegemony.
Categories: History

The Latin American Subaltern Studies Reader

The Latin American Subaltern Studies Reader

8 Ranajit Guha, ''Dominance without Hegemony and Its Historiography,'' Selected
Subaltern Studies VI (London: Oxford University Press, 1989), 210–309. 9
Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, A Critique of Postcolonial Reason: Toward a History
of ...

Author: Ileana Rodriguez

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822380771

Category: History

Page: 472

View: 155

Sharing a postrevolutionary sympathy with the struggles of the poor, the contributors to this first comprehensive collection of writing on subalternity in Latin America work to actively link politics, culture, and literature. Emerging from a decade of work and debates generated by a collective known as the Latin American Studies Group, the volume privileges the category of the subaltern over that of class, as contributors focus on the possibilities of investigating history from below. In addition to an overview by Ranajit Guha, essay topics include nineteenth-century hygiene in Latin American countries, Rigoberta Menchú after the Nobel, commentaries on Haitian and Argentinian issues, the relationship between gender and race in Bolivia, and ungovernability and tragedy in Peru. Providing a radical critique of elite culture and of liberal, bourgeois, and modern epistemologies and projects, the essays included here prove that Latin American Subaltern Studies is much more than the mere translation of subaltern studies from South Asia to Latin America. Contributors. Marcelo Bergman, John Beverley, Robert Carr, Sara Castro-Klarén, Michael Clark, Beatriz González Stephan, Ranajit Guha, María Milagros López , Walter Mignolo, Alberto Moreiras, Abdul-Karim Mustapha, José Rabasa, Ileana Rodríguez, Josefina Saldaña-Portillo, Javier Sanjinés, C. Patricia Seed, Doris Sommer, Marcia Stephenson, Mónica Szurmuk, Gareth Williams, Marc Zimmerman
Categories: History

Hegemony and World Order

Hegemony and World Order

Counter-hegemonic struggles in India have traditionally relied on political
violence, as practised by the British Raj in India, ... The most attention to the
concept of hegemony was given in Dominance without Hegemony: History and
Power in ...

Author: Piotr Dutkiewicz

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000191455

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 260

View: 587

Hegemony and World Order explores a key question for our tumultuous times of multiple global crises. Does hegemony – that is, legitimated rule by dominant power – have a role in ordering world politics of the twenty-first century? If so, what form does that hegemony take: does it lie with a leading state or with some other force? How does contemporary world hegemony operate: what tools does it use and what outcomes does it bring? This volume addresses these questions by assembling perspectives from various regions across the world, including Canada, Central Asia, China, Europe, India, Russia and the USA. The contributions in this book span diverse theoretical perspectives from realism to postcolonialism, as well as multiple issue areas such as finance, the Internet, migration and warfare. By exploring the role of non-state actors, transnational networks, and norms, this collection covers various standpoints and moves beyond traditional concepts of state-based hierarches centred on material power. The result is a wealth of novel insights on today's changing dynamics of world politics. Hegemony and World Order is critical reading for policymakers and advanced students of International Relations, Global Governance, Development, and International Political Economy.
Categories: Business & Economics

Hegemony and Heteronormativity

Hegemony and Heteronormativity

... paradox – a dominance without hegemony in the sense that its structure of
dominance is 'non-hegemonic with persuasion outweighed by coercion' (1998:
xii).7 Furthermore, guha's analysis of nationalist politics in india unfolds a
structural ...

Author: María do Mar Castro Varela

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317122869

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 727

This book reflects on 'the political' in queer theory and politics by revisiting two of its key categories: hegemony and heteronormativity. It explores the specific insights offered by these categories and the ways in which they augment the analysis of power and domination from a queer perspective, whilst also examining the possibilities for political analysis and strategy-building provided by theories of hegemony and heteronormativity. Moreover, in addressing these issues the book strives to rethink the understanding of the term "queer", so as to avoid narrowing queer politics to a critique of normative heterosexuality and the rigid gender binary. By looking at the interplay between hegemony and heteronormativity, this ground-breaking volume presents new possibilities of reconceptualizing 'the political' from a queer perspective. Investigating the effects of queer politics not only on subjectivities and intimate personal relations, but also on institutions, socio-cultural processes and global politics, this book will be of interest to those working in the fields of critical theory, gender and sexuality, queer theory, postcolonial studies, and feminist political theory.
Categories: Social Science

History at the Limit of World History

History at the Limit of World History

Ranajit Guha, perhaps the most influential figure in postcolonial and subaltern studies at work today, offers a critique of such historiography by taking issue with the Hegelian concept of World-history.

Author: Ranajit Guha

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231505093

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 477

The past is not just, as has been famously said, another country with foreign customs: it is a contested and colonized terrain. Indigenous histories have been expropriated, eclipsed, sometimes even wholly eradicated, in the service of imperialist aims buttressed by a distinctly Western philosophy of history. Ranajit Guha, perhaps the most influential figure in postcolonial and subaltern studies at work today, offers a critique of such historiography by taking issue with the Hegelian concept of World-history. That concept, he contends, reduces the course of human history to the amoral record of states and empires, great men and clashing civilizations. It renders invisible the quotidian experience of ordinary people and casts off all that came before it into the nether-existence known as "Prehistory." On the Indian subcontinent, Guha believes, this Western way of looking at the past was so successfully insinuated by British colonization that few today can see clearly its ongoing and pernicious influence. He argues that to break out of this habit of mind and go beyond the Eurocentric and statist limit of World-history historians should learn from literature to make their narratives doubly inclusive: to extend them in scope not only to make room for the pasts of the so-called peoples without history but to address the historicality of everyday life as well. Only then, as Guha demonstrates through an examination of Rabindranath Tagore's critique of historiography, can we recapture a more fully human past of "experience and wonder."
Categories: History

The Hegemony of Heritage

The Hegemony of Heritage

... clear in the concluding paragraph of Guha's introduction, where he writes: “All
of Indian Historiography in its dominant, ... criticism without situating it first in the
relationship that bonds it to colonialism—a dominance without hegemony—and ...

Author: Deborah L. Stein

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520968882

Category: History

Page: 338

View: 673

A free ebook version of this title is available through Luminos, University of California Press’s Open Access publishing program. Visit www.luminosoa.org to learn more. The Hegemony of Heritage makes an original and significant contribution to our understanding of how the relationship of architectural objects and societies to the built environment changes over time. Studying two surviving medieval monuments in southern Rajasthan—the Ambika Temple in Jagat and the Ékalingji Temple Complex in Kailaspuri—the author looks beyond their divergent sectarian affiliations and patronage structures to underscore many aspects of common practice. This book offers new and extremely valuable insights into these important monuments, illuminating the entangled politics of antiquity and revealing whether a monument’s ritual record is affirmed as continuous and hence hoary or dismissed as discontinuous or reinvented through various strategies. The Hegemony of Heritage enriches theoretical constructs with ethnographic description and asks us to reexamine notions such as archive and text through the filter of sculpture and mantra.
Categories: History

Postcolonial Theory and the Specter of Capital

Postcolonial Theory and the Specter of Capital

Dominance without Hegemony was released in 1997, very much in the mature
phase ofthe Sub alternist project, and its arguments were clearly intended to
elaborate the highly compressed declarations of the inaugural volume in the
series.

Author: Vivek Chibber

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN: 9781781682555

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 983

Postcolonial theory has become enormously influential as a framework for understanding the Global South. It is also a school of thought popular because of its rejection of the supposedly universalizing categories of the Enlightenment. In this devastating critique, mounted on behalf of the radical Enlightenment tradition, Vivek Chibber offers the most comprehensive response yet to postcolonial theory. Focusing on the hugely popular Subaltern Studies project, Chibber shows that its foundational arguments are based on a series of analytical and historical misapprehensions. He demonstrates that it is possible to affirm a universalizing theory without succumbing to Eurocentrism or reductionism. Postcolonial Theory and the Specter of Capital promises to be a historical milestone in contemporary social theory. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Categories: Political Science

Animals and the Human Imagination

Animals and the Human Imagination

“Colonialism in South Asia: A Dominance Without Hegemony and Its
Historiography.” In Dominance Without Hegemony, 1–99. Cambridge, MA:
Harvard University Press. Gupta, Akhil. 1998. Postcolonial Developments:
Agriculture in the ...

Author: Aaron S. Gross

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231527767

Category: Nature

Page: 400

View: 911

Human beings have long imagined their subjectivity, ethics, and ancestry with and through animals, yet not until the mid-twentieth century did contemporary thought reflect critically on animals' significance in human self-conception. Thinkers such as French philosopher Jacques Derrida, South African novelist J. M. Coetzee, and American theorist Donna Haraway have initiated rigorous inquiries into the question of the animal, now blossoming in a number of directions. It is no longer strange to say that if animals did not exist, we would have to invent them. This interdisciplinary and cross-cultural collection reflects the growth of animal studies as an independent field and the rise of "animality" as a critical lens through which to analyze society and culture, on a par with race and gender. Essays consider the role of animals in the human imagination and the imagination of the human; the worldviews of indigenous peoples; animal-human mythology in early modern China; and political uses of the animal in postcolonial India. They engage with the theoretical underpinnings of the animal protection movement, representations of animals in children's literature, depictions of animals in contemporary art, and the philosophical positioning of the animal from Aristotle to Derrida. The strength of this companion lies in its timeliness and contextual diversity, which makes it essential reading for students and researchers while further developing the parameters of the discipline.
Categories: Nature

The Politics of the Governed

The Politics of the Governed

Needless to say, questions such as the global dominance of capital or the
interests of laborers or the struggle of the ... one of Professor Susobhan Sarkar's
most distinguished students, we could say that this is “dominance without
hegemony.

Author: Partha Chatterjee

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231503891

Category: Political Science

Page: 200

View: 846

Often dismissed as the rumblings of "the street," popular politics is where political modernity is being formed today, according to Partha Chatterjee. The rise of mass politics all over the world in the twentieth century led to the development of new techniques of governing population groups. On the one hand, the idea of popular sovereignty has gained wide acceptance. On the other hand, the proliferation of security and welfare technologies has created modern governmental bodies that administer populations, but do not provide citizens with an arena for democratic deliberation. Under these conditions, democracy is no longer government of, by, and for the people. Rather, it has become a world of power whose startling dimensions and unwritten rules of engagement Chatterjee provocatively lays bare. This book argues that the rise of ethnic or identity politics—particularly in the postcolonial world—is a consequence of new techniques of governmental administration. Using contemporary examples from India, the book examines the different forms taken by the politics of the governed. Many of these operate outside of the traditionally defined arena of civil society and the formal legal institutions of the state. This book considers the global conditions within which such local forms of popular politics have appeared and shows us how both community and global society have been transformed. Chatterjee's analysis explores the strategic as well as the ethical dimensions of the new democratic politics of rights, claims, and entitlements of population groups and permits a new understanding of the dynamics of world politics both before and after the events of September 11, 2001. The Politics of the Governed consists of three essays, originally given as the Leonard Hastings Schoff Lectures at Columbia University in November 2001, and four additional essays that complement and extend the analyses presented there. By combining these essays between the covers of a single volume, Chatterjee has given us a major and urgent work that provides a full perspective on the possibilities and limits of democracy in the postcolonial world.
Categories: Political Science

History at the Limit of World history

History at the Limit of World history

Guha offers a critique of such historiography by taking issue with the Hegelian concept of World-history.

Author: Ranajit Guha

Publisher:

ISBN: 023112418X

Category: History

Page: 116

View: 328

The past is not just, as has been famously said, another country with foreign customs: it is a contested and colonized terrain. Indigenous histories have been expropriated, eclipsed, sometimes even wholly eradicated, in the service of imperialist aims buttressed by a distinctly Western philosophy of history. Ranajit Guha, perhaps the most influential figure in postcolonial and subaltern studies at work today, offers a critique of such historiography by taking issue with the Hegelian concept of World-history. That concept, he contends, reduces the course of human history to the amoral record of states and empires, great men and clashing civilizations. It renders invisible the quotidian experience of ordinary people and casts off all that came before it into the nether-existence known as "Prehistory." On the Indian subcontinent, Guha believes, this Western way of looking at the past was so successfully insinuated by British colonization that few today can see clearly its ongoing and pernicious influence. He argues that to break out of this habit of mind and go beyond the Eurocentric and statist limit of World-history historians should learn from literature to make their narratives doubly inclusive: to extend them in scope not only to make room for the pasts of the so-called peoples without history but to address the historicality of everyday life as well. Only then, as Guha demonstrates through an examination of Rabindranath Tagore's critique of historiography, can we recapture a more fully human past of "experience and wonder."
Categories: History

Cinema Transnationalism and Colonial India

Cinema  Transnationalism  and Colonial India

4 Guha describes the history of imperial rule as not merely a struggle between
unified categories of imperialists and nationalists but as a network of
relationships between many fractious groups, evidence of the “dominance
without hegemony” ...

Author: Babli Sinha

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136765001

Category: History

Page: 158

View: 528

Through the lens of cinema, this book explores the ways in which the United States, Britain and India impacted each other politically, culturally and ideologically. It argues that American films of the 1920s posited alternative notions of whiteness and the West to that of Britain, which stood for democracy and social mobility even at a time of virulent racism. The book examines the impact that the American cinema has on Indian filmmakers of the period, who were integrating its conventions with indigenous artistic traditions to articulate an Indian modernity. It considers the way American films in the 1920s presented an orientalist fantasy of Asia, which occluded the harsh realities of anti-Asian sentiment and legislation in the period as well as the exciting engagement of anti-imperial activists who sought to use the United States as the base of a transnational network. The book goes on to analyse the American ‘empire films’ of the 1930s, which adapted British narratives of empire to represent the United States as a new global paradigm. Presenting close readings of films, literature and art from the era, the book engages cinema studies with theories of post-colonialism and transnationalism, and provides a novel approach to the study of Indian cinema.
Categories: History

Native and National in Brazil

Native and National in Brazil

... are represented, thus revealing what anthropologist Alpa Shah has called “the
dark side of indigeneity,” and establishing an order that historian Ranajit Guha
characterized in the case of postcolonial India as “dominance without hegemony.

Author: Tracy Devine Guzmán

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9781469602103

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 598

How do the lives of indigenous peoples relate to the romanticized role of "Indians" in Brazilian history, politics, and cultural production? Native and National in Brazil charts this enigmatic relationship from the sixteenth century to the present, focusing on the consolidation of the dominant national imaginary in the postindependence period and highlighting Native peoples' ongoing work to decolonize it. Engaging issues ranging from sovereignty, citizenship, and national security to the revolutionary potential of art, sustainable development, and the gendering of ethnic differences, Tracy Devine Guzman argues that the tensions between popular renderings of "Indianness" and lived indigenous experience are critical to the unfolding of Brazilian nationalism, on the one hand, and the growth of the Brazilian indigenous movement, on the other. Devine Guzman suggests that the "indigenous question" now posed by Brazilian indigenous peoples themselves--how to be Native and national at the same time--can help us to rethink national belonging in accordance with the protection of human rights, the promotion of social justice, and the consolidation of democratic governance for indigenous and nonindigenous citizens alike.
Categories: Social Science

Representing Rebellion

Representing Rebellion

It was historiography which , more than any other bourgeois knowledge ,
contributed to the fabrication of this spurious hegemony . " Guha has noted that
colonial dominance worked either with or without hegemony . A primary
contention of my ...

Author: Daniel J. Rycroft

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: UOM:39015063353307

Category: History

Page: 321

View: 128

Contribution of Santal, South Asian people in the freedom struggle against British rule in India; covers the period, 1845-1856; study based on pictorial representations.
Categories: History

Empire and Nation

Empire and Nation

... on the 'real' causes of the collapse of the 'Emergency'. 17The writings of the
Subaltern Studies group of historians have explored these themes most
elaborately. See in particular Ranajit Guha, Dominance Without Hegemony (
Cambridge, ...

Author: Partha Chatterjee

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231526500

Category: Political Science

Page: 384

View: 814

Partha Chatterjee is one of the world's greatest living theorists on the political, cultural, and intellectual history of nationalism. Beginning in the 1980s, his work, particularly within the context of India, has served as the foundation for subaltern studies, an area of scholarship he continues to develop. In this collection, English-speaking readers are finally able to experience the breadth and substance of Chatterjee's wide-ranging thought. His provocative essays examine the phenomenon of postcolonial democracy and establish the parameters for research in subaltern politics. They include an early engagement with agrarian politics and Chatterjee's brilliant book reviews and journalism. Selections include one never-before-published essay, "A Tribute to the Master," which considers through a mock retelling of an episode from the classic Sanskrit epic, The Mahabharata, a deep dilemma in the study of postcolonial history, and several Bengali essays, now translated into English for the first time. An introduction by Nivedita Menon adds necessary context and depth, critiquing Chatterjee's ideas and their influence on contemporary political thought.
Categories: Political Science

Anxieties of Empire and the Fiction of Intrigue

Anxieties of Empire and the Fiction of Intrigue

In Dominance Without Hegemony: History and Power in Colonial India (
cambridge, Mass.: Harvard university Press, 1997), Ranajit guha argues that
contrary to the processes of hegemony that obtained in the West, colonial rule
was exercised ...

Author: Yumna Siddiqi

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231510868

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 304

View: 410

Focusing on late nineteenth- and twentieth-century stories of detection, policing, and espionage by British and South Asian writers, Yumna Siddiqi presents an original and compelling exploration of the cultural anxieties created by imperialism. She suggests that while colonial writers use narratives of intrigue to endorse imperial rule, postcolonial writers turn the generic conventions and topography of the fiction of intrigue on its head, launching a critique of imperial power that makes the repressive and emancipatory impulses of postcolonial modernity visible. Siddiqi devotes the first part of her book to the colonial fiction of Arthur Conan Doyle and John Buchan, in which the British regime's preoccupation with maintaining power found its voice. The rationalization of difference, pronouncedly expressed through the genre's strategies of representation and narrative resolution, helped to reinforce domination and, in some cases, allay fears concerning the loss of colonial power. In the second part, Siddiqi argues that late twentieth-century South Asian writers also underscore the state's insecurities, but unlike British imperial writers, they take a critical view of the state's authoritarian tendencies. Such writers as Amitav Ghosh, Michael Ondaatje, Arundhati Roy, and Salman Rushdie use the conventions of detective and spy fiction in creative ways to explore the coercive actions of the postcolonial state and the power dynamics of a postcolonial New Empire. Drawing on the work of leading theorists of imperialism such as Edward Said, Frantz Fanon, and the Subaltern Studies historians, Siddiqi reveals how British writers express the anxious workings of a will to maintain imperial power in their writing. She also illuminates the ways South Asian writers portray the paradoxes of postcolonial modernity and trace the ruses and uses of reason in a world where the modern marks a horizon not only of hope but also of economic, military, and ecological disaster.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Archives of Authority

Archives of Authority

... and independence without liberation, 50, 60; and interstices with Cold War, 1,
9, 10, 11, 12, 21, 23,46, 126m89; modes ... (Keisuke), 43 Doctor Faustus (Mann),
51 Dominance without Hegemony (Guha), 88 Dominican Republic, 47 Dover, ...

Author: Andrew N. Rubin

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400842179

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 200

View: 570

Combining literary, cultural, and political history, and based on extensive archival research, including previously unseen FBI and CIA documents, Archives of Authority argues that cultural politics--specifically America's often covert patronage of the arts--played a highly important role in the transfer of imperial authority from Britain to the United States during a critical period after World War II. Andrew Rubin argues that this transfer reshaped the postwar literary space and he shows how, during this time, new and efficient modes of cultural transmission, replication, and travel--such as radio and rapidly and globally circulated journals--completely transformed the position occupied by the postwar writer and the role of world literature. Rubin demonstrates that the nearly instantaneous translation of texts by George Orwell, Thomas Mann, W. H. Auden, Richard Wright, Mary McCarthy, and Albert Camus, among others, into interrelated journals that were sponsored by organizations such as the CIA's Congress for Cultural Freedom and circulated around the world effectively reshaped writers, critics, and intellectuals into easily recognizable, transnational figures. Their work formed a new canon of world literature that was celebrated in the United States and supposedly represented the best of contemporary thought, while less politically attractive authors were ignored or even demonized. This championing and demonizing of writers occurred in the name of anti-Communism--the new, transatlantic "civilizing mission" through which postwar cultural and literary authority emerged.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Theory in an Uneven World

Theory in an Uneven World

Also see Ranajit Guha, “Dominance without Hegemony and its Historiography,”
in Subaltern Studies, Vol. 6: Writings on South Asian History and Society, ed.
Guha (Delhi: Oxford University Press, 1989), pp. 210–309, for a sensitive
analysis of ...

Author: R. Radhakrishnan

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781405142830

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 454

This major intervention into debates about the postcolonial and theglobal proposes that theory should embody unevenness as symptomeven as it envisions strategies to get beyond unevenness.Radhakrishnan's thought-provoking engagement with theorists andwriters from around the world will fascinate readers across a widerange of disciplines. A major intervention into debates about the postcolonial andthe global. Proposes that theory bear the burden of unevenness even as itseeks a way out of it - neither captive to the world as it is, nornaively credulous of visions of the world as it should be, theoryargues for an ethics of persuasion that is firmly rooted inpolitical resistance. Engages with a wide range of theorists and writers from aroundthe world. Ranges over fields as diverse as critical theory,postmodernism, poststructuralism, postcolonialism, minoritystudies, cultural studies and anthropology.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Archaeologies of Colonialism

Archaeologies of Colonialism

Such acts may become particularly salient in colonial situations that Ranajit Guha
characterizes as “dominance without hegemony.”48 In such contexts,
asymmetries of coercive power are marked, but ideological struggles over
identity and ...

Author: Michael Dietler

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520947948

Category: Social Science

Page: 480

View: 600

This book presents a theoretically informed, up-to-date study of interactions between indigenous peoples of Mediterranean France and Etruscan, Greek, and Roman colonists during the first millennium BC. Analyzing archaeological data and ancient texts, Michael Dietler explores these colonial encounters over six centuries, focusing on material culture, urban landscapes, economic practices, and forms of violence. He shows how selective consumption linked native societies and colonists and created transformative relationships for each. Archaeologies of Colonialism also examines the role these ancient encounters played in the formation of modern European identity, colonial ideology, and practices, enumerating the problems for archaeologists attempting to re-examine these past societies.
Categories: Social Science

Kazakhstan Ethnicity Language and Power

Kazakhstan   Ethnicity  Language and Power

The first language in which the dominated learn to speak of power is that of the
dominant. (Ranajit Guha, Dominance without Hegemony, 1997) Even if 85 per
cent of the inhabitants of Kazakhstan did not speak Russian, its elimination from
the ...

Author: Bhavna Dave

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134324989

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 586

Kazakhstan is emerging as the most dynamic economic and political actor in Central Asia. It is the second largest country of the former Soviet Union, after the Russian Federation, and has rich natural resources, particularly oil, which is being exploited through massive US investment. Kazakhstan has an impressive record of economic growth under the leadership of President Nursultan Nazarbaev, and has ambitions to project itself as a modern, wealthy civic state, with a developed market economy. At the same time, Kazakhstan is one of the most ethnically diverse countries in the region, with very substantial non-Kazakh and non-Muslim minorities. Its political regime has used elements of political clientelism and neo-traditional practices to bolster its rule. Drawing from extensive ethnographic research, interviews, and archival materials this book traces the development of national identity and statehood in Kazakhstan, focusing in particular on the attempts to build a national state. It argues that Russification and Sovietization were not simply 'top-down' processes, that they provide considerable scope for local initiatives, and that Soviet ethnically-based affirmative action policies have had a lasting impact on ethnic élite formation and the rise of a distinct brand of national consciousness.
Categories: History

Resistance Space and Political Identities

Resistance  Space and Political Identities

Guha, R. (1997) Dominance Without Hegemony: History and Power in Colonial
India Harvard, MA: Harvard University Press. Guha, R. (1983) Elementary
Aspects of Peasant Insurgency New Delhi: Oxford University Press. Guha, R. (
1982) 'On ...

Author: David Featherstone

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781444399394

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 211

Utilizing research on networked struggles in both the 18th-century Atlantic world and our modern day, Resistance, Space and Political Identities: The Making of Counter-Global Networks challenges existing understandings of the relations between space, politics, and resistance to develop an innovative account of networked forms of resistance and political activity. Explores counter-global struggles in both the past and present—including both the 18th-century Atlantic world and contemporary forms of resistance Examines the productive geographies of contestation Foregrounds the solidarities and geographies of connection between different place-based struggles and argues that such solidarities are essential to produce more plural forms of globalization
Categories: Social Science