Divine Violence

Divine Violence

Divine Violence looks at the question of political theology and its connection to sovereignty.

Author: James R. Martel

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136632563

Category: Law

Page: 168

View: 328

Divine Violence looks at the question of political theology and its connection to sovereignty. It argues that the practice of sovereignty reflects a Christian eschatology, one that proves very hard to overcome even by left thinkers, such as Arendt and Derrida, who are very critical of it. These authors fall into a trap described by Carl Schmitt whereby one is given a (false) choice between anarchy and sovereignty, both of which are bound within—and return us to—the same eschatological envelope. In Divine Violence, the author argues that Benjamin supplies the correct political theology to help these thinkers. He shows how to avoid trying to get rid of sovereignty (the "anarchist move" that Schmitt tells us forces us to "decide against the decision") and instead to seek to de-center and dislocate sovereignty so that it’s mythological function is disturbed. He does this with the aid of divine violence, a messianic force that comes into the world to undo its own mythology, leaving nothing in its wake. Such a move clears the myths of sovereignty away, turning us to our own responsibility in the process. In that way, the author argues,Benjamin succeeds in producing an anarchism that is not bound by Schmitt’s trap but which is sustained even while we remain dazzled by the myths of sovereignty that structure our world. Divine Violence will be of interest to students of political theory, to those with an interest in political theology, philosophy and deconstruction, and to those who are interested in thinking about some of the dilemmas that the ‘left’ finds itself in today.
Categories: Law

Divine Violence in the Book of Samuel

Divine Violence in the Book of Samuel

"Through the example of David's census in 2 Samuel 24, key issues related to divine violence in the book of Samuel are introduced: the occurrence of inexplicable divine violence; the interplay of divine and human sovereignty; God's emotion; ...

Author: Rachelle Gilmour

Publisher:

ISBN: 0190938099

Category: Bible

Page:

View: 690

"Through the example of David's census in 2 Samuel 24, key issues related to divine violence in the book of Samuel are introduced: the occurrence of inexplicable divine violence; the interplay of divine and human sovereignty; God's emotion; and the relationship between forgiveness and punishment. The parameters for the use of the term "divine violence" in this study are defined, taking into account the distinction between subjective and objective violence and Walter Benjamin's technical use of the term. The methodology of this study is outlined. Debate regarding a proposed "dark side" of God will be addressed through contemporary thinkers who challenge the dominance of retributive frameworks in ethical evaluation. An account of the characterisation of God will be given that acknowledges a diversity of traditions in the text, and focuses minimally on narrative gaps. Political contexts for the divine violence will be proposed, both monarchic and exilic"--
Categories: Bible

Divine Violence

Divine Violence

Providing an account of political repression in Argentina, this book takes as its theme the intersection of religion, violence and psychosexuality as they relate to the desire for power and to the myths and rituals manifesting that desire.

Author: Frank Graziano

Publisher: Westview Press

ISBN: STANFORD:36105000131404

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 976

Providing an account of political repression in Argentina, this book takes as its theme the intersection of religion, violence and psychosexuality as they relate to the desire for power and to the myths and rituals manifesting that desire.
Categories: History

Weird John Brown

Weird John Brown

Concepts such as jihad, crusade, and sacrifice need to be rooted out, the story goes, for the sake of more bounded and secular understandings of violence.

Author: Ted A. Smith

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 0804793301

Category: Religion

Page: 221

View: 868

Conventional wisdom holds that attempts to combine religion and politics will produce unlimited violence. Concepts such as jihad, crusade, and sacrifice need to be rooted out, the story goes, for the sake of more bounded and secular understandings of violence. Ted Smith upends this dominant view, drawing on Walter Benjamin, Giorgio Agamben, and others to trace the ways that seemingly secular politics produce their own forms of violence without limit. He brings this argument to life—and digs deep into the American political imagination—through a string of surprising reflections on John Brown, the nineteenth-century abolitionist who took up arms against the state in the name of a higher law. Smith argues that the key to limiting violence is not its separation from religion, but its connection to richer and more critical modes of religious reflection. Weird John Brown develops a negative political theology that challenges both the ways we remember American history and the ways we think about the nature, meaning, and exercise of violence.
Categories: Religion

Divine Violence and the Christus Victor Atonement Model

Divine Violence and the Christus Victor Atonement Model

In this book Martyn Smith addresses the issue of God's violence and refuses to shy away from difficult and controversial conclusions.

Author: Martyn J. Smith

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781498239479

Category: Religion

Page: 262

View: 457

In this book Martyn Smith addresses the issue of God's violence and refuses to shy away from difficult and controversial conclusions. Through his wide-ranging and measured study he reflects upon God and violence in both biblical and theological contexts, assessing the implications of divine violence for understanding and engaging with God's nature and character. Jesus too, through his dramatic actions in the temple, is presented as one capable of exhibiting a surprising degree of violent behavior in the furtherance of God's purposes. Through a reappropriation of the ancient Christus Victor model of atonement, with its dramatic representation of God's war with the Satan, Smith proposes that Christian understanding of both God and salvation has to return to its long-neglected past in order to move forward, both biblically and dynamically, into the future.
Categories: Religion

Divine Violence

Divine Violence

Providing an account of political repression in Argentina, this book takes as its theme the intersection of religion, violence and psychosexuality as they relate to the desire for power and to the myths and rituals manifesting that desire.

Author: Frank Graziano

Publisher: Westview Press

ISBN: 0813382327

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 456

Providing an account of political repression in Argentina, this book takes as its theme the intersection of religion, violence and psychosexuality as they relate to the desire for power and to the myths and rituals manifesting that desire.
Categories: History

The Violence of the Lamb

The Violence of the Lamb

Paul Middleton argues here, however, that it is in fact a representation of direct participation by Christians, through their martyrdom, in divine violence against those the author of Revelation portrays as God's enemies.

Author: Paul Middleton

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9780567467225

Category: Religion

Page: 304

View: 492

The act of martyrdom in the worldview of the Apocalypse has been considered to be an exemplification of non-violent resistance. Paul Middleton argues here, however, that it is in fact a representation of direct participation by Christians, through their martyrdom, in divine violence against those the author of Revelation portrays as God's enemies. Middleton shows that acceptance of martyrdom is to grasp the invitation to participate in the Revelation's divine violence. Martyrs follow the model laid down by the Lamb, who was not only slain, but resurrected, glorified, and who executes judgement. The world created by the Apocalypse encourages readers to conquer the Beast through martyrdom, but also through the experience of resurrection and being appointed judges. In this role, martyrs participate in the judgement of the wicked by sharing the Lamb's power to judge. Different from eschewing violence, the conceptual world of the Apocalypse portrays God, the Lamb, and the martyrs as possessing more power, might, and violent potential than the Emperor and his armies. Middleton believes that martyrdom and violence are necessary components of the worldview of Revelation.
Categories: Religion

Wrestling with the Violence of God

Wrestling with the Violence of God

The chapters in this volume present empathetic, holistic, and methodologically responsible readings of the Old Testament as Christian Scripture.

Author: M. Daniel Carroll R.

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9781575068312

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 563

The prevalence of evil and violence in the world is a growing focus of scholarly attention, especially violence done in the name of religion and violence found within the pages of the Old Testament. Many atheists consider this reason enough to reject the notion of a supreme deity. Some Christians attempt to exonerate God by reinterpreting problematic passages or by prioritizing portrayals of God’s nonviolence. Other Christians have begun to respond to violence in the Old Testament by questioning the nature of the text itself, though not rejecting belief in a good God. Wrestling with the Violence of God: Soundings in the Old Testament is a response to these challenging issues. The chapters in this volume present empathetic, holistic, and methodologically responsible readings of the Old Testament as Christian Scripture. Contributors from different nationalities, religious traditions, and educational institutions come together to address representative biblical material that depicts violence. Chapters address explicit portrayals of divine violence, human responses to violence of God and violence in the world, alternative understandings of supposedly violent texts, and a hopeful future in which violence is no more. Rather than attempt to offer a conclusive answer to the issue, this volume constructively contributes to the ongoing discussion.
Categories: History

Bastard Politics

Bastard Politics

Nick Mansfield draws on Bataille and Derrida to argue that politics is sovereignty in action.

Author: Nick Mansfield

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9781438481661

Category: Philosophy

Page: 204

View: 675

Argues that we need to reinvent sovereignty as a motive for democratic political action while remaining alert to its dangers, specifically its relationship to violence. Sovereignty is usually seen as either the assertion of national rights in the face of external challenge or the cruel license of unaccountable power. In philosophy, sovereignty has been presented as the earthly manifestation of a potentially limitless, preexisting power, usually belonging to God. This divine sovereignty provides a model and the authority for worldly sovereignty. Yet, divine sovereignty also threatens the human by imagining power as transcendent, unquestionable, and potentially infinite. This infinity makes sovereignty endlessly disruptive and thus potentially infinitely violent. Engaging the complexities of sovereignty through the canon of political philosophy from Hobbes to Foucault and Agamben, Bastard Politics argues that there is no escaping this ambiguity. Nick Mansfield draws on Bataille and Derrida to argue that politics is sovereignty in action. In order to deal with the political challenges of the climate change era—including the enactment of global justice, the future of democracy, and unpredictable surges in population movement—we must embrace the possibilities of human sovereignty while remaining mindful of its dangers. Nick Mansfield is Honorary Professor of Critical and Cultural Studies at Macquarie University in Sydney. He is the author of several books, including The God Who Deconstructs Himself: Subjectivity and Sovereignty between Freud, Bataille and Derrida and Theorizing War: From Hobbes to Badiou.
Categories: Philosophy

Towards the Critique of Violence

Towards the Critique of Violence

Topics of this collection include mythic violence, the techniques of non-violent conflict resolution, ambiguity, destiny or fate, decision and nature, and the relation between justice and thinking.

Author: Brendan Moran

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781472529282

Category: Philosophy

Page: 256

View: 226

In the past two and a half decades, Walter Benjamin's early essay 'Towards the Critique of Violence' (1921) has taken a central place in politico-philosophic debates. The complexity and perhaps even the occasional obscurity of Benjamin's text have undoubtedly contributed to the diversity, conflict, and richness of contemporary readings. Interest has heightened following the attention that philosophers such as Jacques Derrida and Giorgio Agamben have devoted to it. Agamben's own interest started early in his career with his 1970 essay, 'On the Limits of Violence', and Benjamin's essay continues to be a fundamental reference in Agamben's work. Written by internationally recognized scholars, Towards the Critique of Violence is the first book to explore politico-philosophic implications of Benjamin's 'Critique of Violence' and correlative implications of Benjamin's resonance in Agamben's writings. Topics of this collection include mythic violence, the techniques of non-violent conflict resolution, ambiguity, destiny or fate, decision and nature, and the relation between justice and thinking. The volume explores Agamben's usage of certain Benjaminian themes, such as Judaism and law, bare life, sacrifice, and Kantian experience, culminating with the English translation of Agamben's 'On the Limits of Violence'.
Categories: Philosophy

The Violence of Scripture

The Violence of Scripture

Over the years, these texts have been used to justify all sorts of violence: from colonizing people and justifying warfare, to sanctioning violence against women and children.

Author: Eric A. Seibert

Publisher: Fortress Press

ISBN: 9781451424324

Category: Religion

Page: 232

View: 533

No one can read far in the Old Testament without encountering numerous acts of violence that are sanctioned in the text and attributed to both God and humans. Over the years, these texts have been used to justify all sorts of violence: from colonizing people and justifying warfare, to sanctioning violence against women and children. Eric Seibert confrons the problem of "virtuous" violence and urges people to engage in an ethically responsible reading of these troublesome texts. He offers a variety of reading strategies designed to critique textually sanctioned violence, while still finding ways to use even the most difficult texts constructively, thus providing a desperately needed approach to the violence of Scripture that can help us live more peaceably in a world plagued by religious violence. --from publisher description
Categories: Religion

Violence

Violence

Divine violence may manifest itself in a true war as it does in the crowd's divine judgment on a criminal. [...] Divine violence, which is the sign and seal ...

Author: Slavoj Zizek

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN: 9781847653239

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 320

Zizek argues that the physical violence we see is often generated by the systemic violence that sustains our political and economic systems. With the help of eminent philosophers like Marx, Engel and Lacan, as well as frequent references to popular culture, he examines the real causes of violent outbreaks like those seen in Israel and Palestine and in terrorist acts around the world. Ultimately, he warns, doing nothing is often the most violent course of action we can take.
Categories: Social Science

The Hunger Games

The Hunger Games

Author: Teresa Baumbach

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:933300723

Category: Dystopias in literature

Page: 208

View: 359

Categories: Dystopias in literature

Unknowing Fanaticism

Unknowing Fanaticism

These poets demand a new critical method, which this book attempts to model: a historically-minded and politicized formalism that can attend to the complexity of the poetic encounter with fanaticism.

Author: Ross Lerner

Publisher: Fordham Univ Press

ISBN: 9780823283897

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 879

We may think we know what defines religious fanaticism: violent action undertaken with dogmatic certainty. But the term fanatic, from the European Reformation to today, has never been a stable one. Then and now it has been reductively defined to justify state violence and to delegitimize alternative sources of authority. Unknowing Fanaticism rejects the simplified binary of fanatical religion and rational politics, turning to Renaissance literature to demonstrate that fanaticism was integral to how both modern politics and poetics developed, from the German Peasants’ Revolt to the English Civil War. The book traces two entangled approaches to fanaticism in this long Reformation moment: the targeting of it as an extreme political threat and the engagement with it as a deep epistemological and poetic problem. In the first, thinkers of modernity from Martin Luther to Thomas Hobbes and John Locke positioned themselves against fanaticism to pathologize rebellion and abet theological and political control. In the second, which arose alongside and often in response to the first, the poets of fanaticism investigated the link between fanatical self-annihilation—the process by which one could become a vessel for divine violence—and the practices of writing poetry. Edmund Spenser, John Donne, and John Milton recognized in the fanatic’s claim to be a passive instrument of God their own incapacity to know and depict the origins of fanaticism. Yet this crisis of unknowing was a productive one. It led these writers to experiment with poetic techniques that would allow them to address fanaticism’s tendency to unsettle the boundaries between human and divine agency and between individual and collective bodies. These poets demand a new critical method, which this book attempts to model: a historically-minded and politicized formalism that can attend to the complexity of the poetic encounter with fanaticism.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Beyond Posthuman Violence Epic Rewritings of Ethics in the Contemporary Novel

 Beyond  Posthuman Violence  Epic Rewritings of Ethics in the Contemporary Novel

This work explores how the characters in the works of David Foster Wallace, Cormac MacCarthy, J. G. Ballard, Bret Easton Ellis, Chuck Palahniuk, William Gibson, Neal Stephenson, Maurice G. Dantec and China Mieville suffer from these limits ...

Author: Claudio Murgia

Publisher: Vernon Press

ISBN: 9781622738199

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 220

View: 151

Neuroscience tells us that the brain is nothing but a metaphor machine capable of extracting meaning from a chaotic reality. Following Agamben, Arendt, Benjamin and Žižek, a theory of violence can be established according to which violence is a reaction on the part of the individual to the frustration generated by having her metaphor machine suppressed by the mythic narrative of the Law. In opposition to mythic violence, Benjamin posits the justice of divine violence. Divine justice is an excess of life, the very uniqueness of the metaphor machine. The individual is affected by a difficulty to communicate her metaphor machine to the Other, as if it were inexpressible. This work explores how the characters in the works of David Foster Wallace, Cormac MacCarthy, J. G. Ballard, Bret Easton Ellis, Chuck Palahniuk, William Gibson, Neal Stephenson, Maurice G. Dantec and China Mieville suffer from these limits of language and the constrictions of the Law. Through violence they look for their individual Voice, intended as their will-to-say, the ‘pure taking place of language’ (Agamben). In their struggle to be heard these characters are however deaf to the Voice of the Other. There is a need for a new Ethics of Narratives expressed through an Epic of the Voice founded on the will-to-listen, along the lines of the concept of the posthuman theorized by Rosi Braidotti. Here subjectivity is a process of constant autopoiesis dependent on the relationship the individual has with the Other and the environment around her, that is, in the reciprocal will-to-say and will-to-listen. Human beings can meet in the taking-place of language, in the place before the suppressive language of the Law is even born, in a meeting of Voices.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Critiquing Sovereign Violence

Critiquing Sovereign Violence

being able to identify how divine violence is manifested or what actions can legitimately count as divine violence, any action that annihilates can claim to ...

Author: Rae Gavin Rae

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9781474445306

Category: Biopolitics

Page: 232

View: 570

Gavin Rae offers an original approach to sovereign violence by looking at a wide range of thinkers, which he organises into three models. Benjamin, Schmitt, Arendt, Deleuze and Guattari form the radical-juridical perspective; Foucault and Agamben the biopolitical; Derrida the bio-juridical - which Rae argues produces the most nuanced account. Rae engages with new translations of 'The Beast and the Sovereign' and 'The Death Penalty' to show that Derrida offers a radical and alternative angle in which violence is placed between law and life, simultaneously creating and regulating each through the other.
Categories: Biopolitics

Violence

Violence

divine violence with revolutionary violence. And he does explicitly say that this revolutionary violence is nonviolent. But if we return to the context in ...

Author: Richard J. Bernstein

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780745678795

Category: Political Science

Page: 208

View: 668

We live in a time when we are overwhelmed with talk and images ofviolence. Whether on television, the internet, films or the videoscreen, we can’t escape representations of actual orfictional violence - another murder, another killing spree in ahigh school or movie theatre, another action movie filled withimages of violence. Our age could well be called “The Age ofViolence” because representations of real or imaginedviolence, sometimes fused together, are pervasive. But what do wemean by violence? What can violence achieve? Are there limits toviolence and, if so, what are they? In this new book Richard Bernstein seeks to answer these questionsby examining the work of five figures who have thought deeply aboutviolence - Carl Schmitt, Walter Benjamin, Hannah Arendt, FrantzFanon, and Jan Assmann. He shows that we have much to learn fromtheir work about the meaning of violence in our times. Through thecritical examination of their writings he also brings out thelimits of violence. There are compelling reasons to commitourselves to non-violence, and yet at the same time we have toacknowledge that there are exceptional circumstances in whichviolence can be justified. Bernstein argues that there can be nogeneral criteria for determining when violence is justified. Theonly plausible way of dealing with this issue is to cultivatepublics in which there is free and open discussion and in whichindividuals are committed to listen to one other: when publicdebate withers, there is nothing to prevent the triumph ofmurderous violence.
Categories: Political Science

Violence Hospitality and the Cross

Violence  Hospitality  and the Cross

We tend to view this edge of violence as something negative — hence our hesitations about the divine violence of election issuing ultimately in the violence ...

Author: Hans Boersma

Publisher: Grand Rapids, Mich. : Baker Academic

ISBN: IND:30000093901852

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 514

Offers a new model for understanding the atonement, sensitive to both the Chrisitan tradition and its postmodern critics.
Categories: Religion