Digital Culture Play and Identity

Digital Culture  Play  and Identity

This book examines the complexity of World of Warcraft from a variety of perspectives, exploring the cultural and social implications of the proliferation of ever more complex digital gameworlds.

Author: Hilde Corneliussen

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262033701

Category: Games

Page: 304

View: 432

World of Warcraft is the world's most popular massively multiplayer online game (MMOG), with (as of March 2007) more than eight million active subscribers across Europe, North America, Asia, and Australia, who play the game an astonishing average of twenty hours a week. This book examines the complexity of World of Warcraft from a variety of perspectives, exploring the cultural and social implications of the proliferation of ever more complex digital gameworlds. The contributors have immersed themselves in the World of Warcraft universe, spending hundreds of hours as players (leading guilds and raids, exploring moneymaking possibilities in the in-game auction house, playing different factions, races, and classes), conducting interviews, and studying the game design--as created by Blizzard Entertainment, the game's developer, and as modified by player-created user interfaces. The analyses they offer are based on both the firsthand experience of being a resident of Azeroth and the data they have gathered and interpreted. The contributors examine the ways that gameworlds reflect the real world--exploring such topics as World of Warcraft as a "capitalist fairytale" and the game's construction of gender; the cohesiveness of the gameworld in terms of geography, mythology, narrative, and the treatment of death as a temporary state; aspects of play, including "deviant strategies" perhaps not in line with the intentions of the designers; and character--both players' identification with their characters and the game's culture of naming characters. The varied perspectives of the contributors--who come from such fields as game studies, textual analysis, gender studies, and postcolonial studies--reflect the breadth and vitality of current interest in MMOGs.Hilde G. Corneliussen and Jill Walker Rettberg are both Associate Professors of Humanistic Informatics at the University of Bergen, Norway.
Categories: Games

Consumer Identites

Consumer Identites

This edited collection explores the notion of agency by tracing the role and activities of consumers from the pre-Internet age into the possible future.

Author: Candice Roberts

Publisher: Intellect Books

ISBN: 9781789380460

Category: Business & Economics

Page:

View: 213

Consumer Identities explores the notion of agency by tracing the role and activities of consumers from the pre-Internet age into the possible future. Using an overview of the historical creation of consumer identity, the collection demonstrates that active consumption is not merely a product of the digital age; it has always been a means by which a person can develop identity. Grounded in the acknowledgment that identity is a constructed and contested space, the authors analyze emerging dynamics in contemporary consumerism, ongoing tensions of structure and agency in consumer identities, and the ways in which identity construction could be influenced in the future. By exploring consumer identity through examples in popular culture, the authors have created a scholarly work that will appeal to industry professionals as well as academics.
Categories: Business & Economics

Understanding Digital Culture

Understanding Digital Culture

This is the perfect text for students looking for a full account of the information society, virtual cultures, sociology of the Internet and new media.

Author: Vincent Miller

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 9781526416704

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 344

View: 655

From profiling databases and mashups to cybersex and the truth about social networking, Miller's insightful second edition traces the pervasive influence of 'digital culture' throughout contemporary life. He integrates socio-economic understandings of the 'information society' with the cultural studies approach to production, use, and consumption of digital media and multimedia. Still refreshingly readable and packed with new examples; Understanding Digital Culture: Includes new and updated material on work and commodity production in digital capitalism, "slacktivism", industrial espionage and major bank hacks, the rise of mobile dating apps, and cyber-bullying alongside trolling. Unpacks how the information society is transforming and challenging traditional notions of crime, resistance, war and protest, community, intimacy and belonging. Crosses disciplines to give a balanced account of the social, economic and cultural dimensions of the information society. Illuminates the increasing importance of mobile, wireless and converged media technologies in everyday life. Charts the changing cultural forms associated with new media and its consumption, including music, gaming, microblogging and online identity. Illustrates the above through a series of contemporary, in-depth case studies of digital culture. This is the perfect text for students looking for a full account of the information society, virtual cultures, sociology of the Internet and new media.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Playful identities

Playful identities

the ludification of digital media cultures Valerie Frissen, Joost Raessens, Jos de
Mul, Sybille Lammes, Michiel de Lange ... Trained as an anthropologist his
research interests include mobile media, cities and urban culture, play, and
identity.

Author: Valerie Frissen

Publisher: Amsterdam University Press

ISBN: 9789048523030

Category: Social Science

Page: 363

View: 753

In this edited volume, eighteen scholars examine the increasing role of digital media technologies in identity construction through play. Going beyond computer games, this interdisciplinary collection argues that present-day play and games are not only appropriate metaphors for capturing postmodern human identities, but are in fact the means by which people create their identity. From discussions of World of Warcraft and Foursquare to digital cartographies, the combined essays form a groundbreaking volume that features the most recent insights in play and game studies, media research, and identity studies.
Categories: Social Science

Computer Games and New Media Cultures

Computer Games and New Media Cultures

In H. G. Corneliussen & J. W. Rettberg (Eds.), Digital culture, play and identity: A
World of Warcraft reader (pp. 1–15). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Ducheneaut, N.,
Yee, N., Nickell, E., & Moore, R. J. (2006). Building an MMO with mass appeal: A
 ...

Author: Johannes Fromme

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789400727779

Category: Education

Page: 712

View: 624

Digital gaming is today a significant economic phenomenon as well as being an intrinsic part of a convergent media culture in postmodern societies. Its ubiquity, as well as the sheer volume of hours young people spend gaming, should make it ripe for urgent academic enquiry, yet the subject was a research backwater until the turn of the millennium. Even today, as tens of millions of young people spend their waking hours manipulating avatars and gaming characters on computer screens, the subject is still treated with scepticism in some academic circles. This handbook aims to reflect the relevance and value of studying digital games, now the subject of a growing number of studies, surveys, conferences and publications. As an overview of the current state of research into digital gaming, the 42 papers included in this handbook focus on the social and cultural relevance of gaming. In doing so, they provide an alternative perspective to one-dimensional studies of gaming, whose agendas do not include cultural factors. The contributions, which range from theoretical approaches to empirical studies, cover various topics including analyses of games themselves, the player-game interaction, and the social context of gaming. In addition, the educational aspects of games and gaming are treated in a discrete section. With material on non-commercial gaming trends such as ‘modding’, and a multinational group of authors from eleven nations, the handbook is a vital publication demonstrating that new media cultures are far more complex and diverse than commonly assumed in a debate dominated by concerns over violent content.
Categories: Education

Digital Spirits in Religion and Media

Digital Spirits in Religion and Media

In Digital, Culture, Play, and Identity: A World of Warcraft Reader, edited by Hilde
G. Corneliussen and Jill Walker Rettberg, 39–62. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
MacCallum-Stewart, Esther and Justin Parsler. 2008. “Role-play vs. Gameplay:
The ...

Author: Alvin Eng Hui Lim

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351188852

Category: Social Science

Page: 260

View: 774

In many contemporary and popular forms of religious practice, digital technology and the spiritual are inseparable. Ranging from streaming broadcasts of spiritual possessions to screenings of mass prayer conferences in stadiums, spirits and divinities now have new forms in which they can materialise. By offering the notion of ‘digital spirits’, this book critically attends to the intersections of digital media and spiritual beings. It also puts forward a new performative perspective on how they interact. Taking cues from the work of Stewart Hoover and Heidi Campbell, among others, the book begins with an outline of the current debates around religion, performance and digital media. It then moves on to examine how mediality and religion, where embodied practices are carried out alongside virtual practices, work together in contemporary Asia. These case studies focus on lived religious practices in combination with various forms of media, and so help demonstrate that digital technology in particular reveals the layered processes of spirituality in practice. Gods and divinities have always relied on media to manifest, and this book is a fascinating exploration of how digital media has continued that tradition and taken it in new directions. As such, it will be of great interest to scholars of religious studies, digital media and performance studies.
Categories: Social Science

Play Creativity and Digital Cultures

Play  Creativity and Digital Cultures

The focus is on the roles industry and consumer culture play in shaping the ways
in which texts are used and interpreted. ... Part II, Children and Digital Cultures,
analyses processes of consumption, with links to representation and identity.

Author: Rebekah Willett

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135894474

Category: Education

Page: 254

View: 503

Recent work on children's digital cultures has identified a range of literacies emerging through children's engagement with new media technologies. This edited collection focuses on children's digital cultures, specifically examining the role of play and creativity in learning with these new technologies. The chapters in this book were contributed by an international range of respected researchers, who seek to extend our understandings of children's interactions with new media, both within and outside of school. They address and provide evidence for continuing debates around the following questions: What notions of creativity are useful in our fields? How does an understanding of play inform analysis of children's engagement with digital cultures? How might school practice take account of out-of-school learning in relation to digital cultures? How can we understand children's engagements with digital technologies in commercialized spaces? Offering current research, theoretical debate and empirical studies, this intriguing text will challenge the thinking of scholars and teachers alike as it explores the evolving nature of play within the media landscape of the twenty-first century.
Categories: Education

Contemporary Art and Digital Culture

Contemporary Art and Digital Culture

This book looks at how contemporary art addresses digitality, circulation, privacy, and globalisation, and suggests how feminism and gender binaries have been shifted by new mediations of identity.

Author: Melissa Gronlund

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781317386421

Category: Social Science

Page: 220

View: 939

Contemporary Art and Digital Culture analyses the impact of the internet and digital technologies upon art today. Art over the last fifteen years has been deeply inflected by the rise of the internet as a mass cultural and socio-political medium, while also responding to urgent economic and political events, from the financial crisis of 2008 to the ongoing conflicts in the Middle East. This book looks at how contemporary art addresses digitality, circulation, privacy, and globalisation, and suggests how feminism and gender binaries have been shifted by new mediations of identity. It situates current artistic practice both in canonical art history and in technological predecessors such as cybernetics and net.art, and takes stock of how the art-world infrastructure has reacted to the internet’s promises of democratisation. An invaluable resource for undergraduate and postgraduate students of contemporary art – especially those studying history of art and art practice and theory – as well as those working in film, media, curation, or art education. Melissa Gronlund is a writer and lecturer on contemporary art, specialising in the moving image. From 2007–2015, she was co-editor of the journal Afterall, and her writing has appeared there and in Artforum, e-flux journal, frieze, the NewYorker.com, and many other places.
Categories: Social Science

Digital Online Culture Identity and Schooling in the Twenty First Century

Digital Online Culture  Identity  and Schooling in the Twenty First Century

Digital Online Culture, Identity and Schooling in the Twenty-First Century provides a cultural, ideological critique of identity construction in the context of virtualization.

Author: K. Rosenfeld

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137442604

Category: Social Science

Page: 204

View: 845

Digital Online Culture, Identity and Schooling in the Twenty-First Century provides a cultural, ideological critique of identity construction in the context of virtualization. Kimberly Rosenfeld explores the growing number of people who no longer reside in one physical reality but live, work, and play in multiple realities. Rosenfeld's critique of neo-liberal practices in the digital environment brings to light the on-going hegemonic and counter-hegemonic battles over control of education in the digital age. Rosenfeld draws conclusions for empowering the population through schooling, and how it should understand, respond to, and help individuals live out the information revolution.
Categories: Social Science

Virtually Sacred

Virtually Sacred

Games and Culture 1 (4): 383–396. ——. 2008. “World Creation and Lore: World
of Warcraft as Rich Text.” In Digital Culture, Play, and Identity: A World of Warcraft
Reader, edited by Hilde G. Corneliussen and Jill Walker Rettberg, pp. 123–142 ...

Author: Robert M. Geraci

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199379972

Category: Religion

Page: 352

View: 708

Millions of users have taken up residence in virtual worlds, and in those worlds they find opportunities to revisit and rewrite their religious lives. Robert M. Geraci argues that virtual worlds and video games have become a locus for the satisfaction of religious needs, providing many users with devoted communities, opportunities for ethical reflection, a meaningful experience of history and human activity, and a sense of transcendence. Using interviews, surveys, and his own first-hand experience within the virtual worlds, Geraci shows how World of Warcraft and Second Life provide participants with the opportunity to rethink what it means to be religious in the contemporary world. Not all participants use virtual worlds for religious purposes, but many online residents use them to rearrange or replace religious practice as designers and users collaborate in the production of a new spiritual marketplace. Using World of Warcraft and Second Life as case studies, this book shows that many residents now use virtual worlds to re-imagine their traditions and work to restore them to "authentic" sanctity, or else replace religious institutions with virtual communities that provide meaning and purpose to human life. For some online residents, virtual worlds are even keys to a post-human future where technology can help us transcend mortal life. Geraci argues that World of Warcraft and Second Life are "virtually sacred" because they do religious work. They often do such work without regard for-and frequently in conflict with-traditional religious institutions and practices; ultimately they participate in our sacred landscape as outsiders, competitors, and collaborators.
Categories: Religion

Museums and Digital Culture

Museums and Digital Culture

This book explores how digital culture is transforming museums in the 21st century.

Author: Tula Giannini

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319974576

Category: Computers

Page: 590

View: 881

This book explores how digital culture is transforming museums in the 21st century. Offering a corpus of new evidence for readers to explore, the authors trace the digital evolution of the museum and that of their audiences, now fully immersed in digital life, from the Internet to home and work. In a world where life in code and digits has redefined human information behavior and dominates daily activity and communication, ubiquitous use of digital tools and technology is radically changing the social contexts and purposes of museum exhibitions and collections, the work of museum professionals and the expectations of visitors, real and virtual. Moving beyond their walls, with local and global communities, museums are evolving into highly dynamic, socially aware and relevant institutions as their connections to the global digital ecosystem are strengthened. As they adopt a visitor-centered model and design visitor experiences, their priorities shift to engage audiences, convey digital collections, and tell stories through exhibitions. This is all part of crafting a dynamic and innovative museum identity of the future, made whole by seamless integration with digital culture, digital thinking, aesthetics, seeing and hearing, where visitors are welcomed participants. The international and interdisciplinary chapter contributors include digital artists, academics, and museum professionals. In themed parts the chapters present varied evidence-based research and case studies on museum theory, philosophy, collections, exhibitions, libraries, digital art and digital future, to bring new insights and perspectives, designed to inspire readers. Enjoy the journey!
Categories: Computers

Postsecondary Play

Postsecondary Play

Taylor, T. L.2008. “Does World of Warcraft Change Everything? How a PvP
Server, Multinational Playerbase, and Surveillance Mod Scene Caused Me
Pause.” In Digital Culture, Play, and Identity: A World of Warcraft Reader, edited
by Hilde G.

Author: William G. Tierney

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9781421413075

Category: Education

Page: 352

View: 927

The college application process—which entails multiple forms, essays, test scores, and deadlines—can be intimidating. For students without substantial school and family support, the complexity of this process can become a barrier to access. William G. Tierney, Tracy Fullerton, and their teams at the University of Southern California approach this challenge innovatively. Using the tools of online games and social media, they have developed ways to make applying for college much less intimidating. While the vast majority of college students use social media and gaming in their everyday lives, colleges and universities have been slow to recognize and harness the power of either. Postsecondary Play explores the significance of games and social media in higher education, and particularly how they can be used to attract, retain, educate, and socialize students. Tierney, a past president of the American Educational Research Association, has gathered some of the best research on the emerging role of games and social media in the classroom and how these tools can boost student confidence and increase college access. Scholars writing from a wide variety of disciplines—college access, social media, game studies, and learning sciences—provide concrete examples to illustrate the new and complex ways in which students learn in response to social media and games. Tierney and the contributors find that, although games can be powerful tools for encouraging underserved students, quality game design and mastering the concept of play—the ability to develop skills while engaging in the game—are essential in the effective use of serious games in teaching and learning. Summarizing a decade of research in game design and learning, Postsecondary Play will appeal to higher education scholars and students of learning, online gaming, education, and the media.
Categories: Education

Fantasy and Belief

Fantasy and Belief

Alternative Religions, Popular Narratives, and Digital Cultures Danielle Kirby.
Francisco, CA: ... In Digital Culture, Play, and Identity: A World of Warcraft Reader
, H. G. Corneliussen & J. Walker Rettberg (eds), 123–42. Cambridge, MA: MIT ...

Author: Danielle Kirby

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317543626

Category: Religion

Page: 224

View: 950

Religion and spirituality are being transformed in our late modern and secularising times. New forms of belief proliferate, often notable for not being limited to traditional systems of reference or expression. Increasingly, these new religions present worldviews which draw directly upon popular culture - or occulture - in fiction, film, art and the internet. Fantasy and Belief explores the context and implications of these types of beliefs through the example of the Otherkin community. The Otherkin are a loosely-affiliated group who believe themselves to be in some way more than just human, their non-humanity often rooted in the characters and narratives of popular fantasy and science fiction. Challenging much current sociological thinking about spirituality and consumption, Fantasy and Belief reveals how popular occulture operates to recycle, develop, and disseminate metaphysical ideas, and how the popular and the sacred are combining in new ways in today's world.
Categories: Religion

Inter vention

Inter vention

Free Play in the Age of Electracy Jan Rune Holmevik. Notes Chapter 1 1.
Nietzsche's ... of Videogames came out in 2008. Also, the first World of Warcraft
reader was among their listings that year, Digital Culture, Play, and Identity: A
World of ...

Author: Jan Rune Holmevik

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262300902

Category: Computers

Page: 232

View: 204

A proposal that electracy—the special skills needed to navigate and understand our digital world—can be developed through play. In today's complex digital world, we must understand new media expressions and digital experiences not simply as more technologically advanced forms of “writing” that can be understood and analyzed as “texts” but as artifacts in their own right that require a unique skill set. Just as agents seeking to express themselves in alphabetic writing need to be literate, “egents” who seek to express themselves in digital media need to be—to use a term coined by cybertheorist Gregory Ulmer—electrate. In Inter/vention, Jan Holmevik helps to invent electracy. He does so by tracing its path across the digital and rhetorical landscape—informatics, hacker heuretics, ethics, pedagogy, virtual space, and monumentality—and by introducing play as a new genre of electracy. Play, he argues, is the electrate ludic transversal. Holmevik contributes to the repertoire of electrate practices in order to understand and demonstrate how play invents electracy. Holmevik's argument straddles two divergences: in rhetoric, between how we study rhetoric as play and how we play rhetorically; and in game studies, between ludology and narratology. Games studies has forged ludology practice by distinguishing it from literate practice (and often allying itself with the scientific tradition). Holmevik is able to link ludology and rhetoric through electracy. Play can and does facilitate invention: play invented the field of ludology. Holmevik proposes a new heuretic in which play acts as a conductor for the invention of electracy. Play is a meta behavior that touches on every aspect of Ulmer's concept of electracy.
Categories: Computers

Facebook and Philosophy

Facebook and Philosophy

4 However, many argue that the code systems of race and gender in World of
Warcraft make manifest real-world systems of identity and difference. See Hilde
Corneliussen, Digital Culture, Play, and Identity: A World of Warcraft Reader (MIT
 ...

Author: D. E. Wittkower

Publisher: Open Court

ISBN: 9780812697209

Category: Philosophy

Page: 324

View: 118

Facebook and Philosophy is an entertaining, multi-faceted exploration of what Facebook means for us and for our relationships. With discussions ranging from the nature of friendship and its relationship to "friending," to the (debatable) efficacy of "online activism," this book is the most extensive and systematic attempt to understand Facebook yet. And with plenty of new perspectives on Twitter and Web 2.0 along the way, this fun, thought-provoking book is a serious and significant contribution for anyone working with social media, whether in academia, journalism, public relations, activism, or business. Exploring far-reaching questions — Can our interactions on Facebook help us care about each other more? Does Facebook signal the death of privacy, or (perhaps worse yet) the death of our desire for privacy? — Facebook and Philosophy is vital reading for anyone involved in social networks today.
Categories: Philosophy

Intercultural Communication Identity and Social Movements in the Digital Age

Intercultural Communication  Identity  and Social Movements in the Digital Age

This book examines the complex and multidimensional relationship between culture and social media, and its specific impact on issues of identity and social movements, in a globalized world.

Author: Margaret U. D'Silva

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351399500

Category: Social Science

Page: 200

View: 823

This book examines the complex and multidimensional relationship between culture and social media, and its specific impact on issues of identity and social movements, in a globalized world. Contemporary cyber culture involves communication among people who are culturally, nationally, and linguistically similar or radically different. Social media becomes a space for mediated cultural information transfer which can either facilitate a vibrant public sphere or create cultural and social cleavages. Contributors of the book come from diverse cultural backgrounds to provide a comprehensive analysis of how these social media exchanges allow members of traditionally oppressed groups find their voices, cultivate communities, and construct their cultural identities in multiple ways. This book will be of great relevance to scholars and students working in the field of media and new media studies, intercultural communication, especially critical intercultural communication, and academics studying social identity and social movements.
Categories: Social Science

Dynamic Fair Dealing

Dynamic Fair Dealing

Digital Culture, Play, and Identity: A World of Warcraft Reader. Cambridge, MA:
MIT Press. Coté, Mark, and Jennifer Pybus. 2007. Learning to Immaterial Labour
2.0: MySpace and social networks. ephemera: theory and politics in organization
 ...

Author: Rosemary Coombe

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9781442665620

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 456

View: 181

Dynamic Fair Dealing argues that only a dynamic, flexible, and equitable approach to cultural ownership can accommodate the astonishing range of ways that we create, circulate, manage, attribute, and make use of digital cultural objects. The Canadian legal tradition strives to balance the rights of copyright holders with public needs to engage with copyright protected material, but there is now a substantial gap between what people actually do with cultural forms and how the law understands those practices. Digital technologies continue to shape new forms of cultural production, circulation, and distribution that challenge both the practicality and the desirability of Canada's fair dealing provisions. Dynamic Fair Dealing presents a range of insightful and provocative essays that rethink our relationship to Canadian fair dealing policy. With contributions from scholars, activists, and artists from across disciplines, professions, and creative practices, this book explores the extent to which copyright has expanded into every facet of society and reveals how our capacities to actually deal fairly with cultural goods has suffered in the process. In order to drive conversations about the cultural worlds Canadians imagine, and the policy reforms we need to realize these visions, we need Dynamic Fair Dealing.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Latin American Identity in Online Cultural Production

Latin American Identity in Online Cultural Production

This volume provides an innovative and timely approach to a fast growing, yet still under-studied field in Latin American cultural production: digital online culture.

Author: Thea Pitman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780415517447

Category: Social Science

Page: 254

View: 234

This volume provides an innovative and timely approach to a fast growing, yet still under-studied field in Latin American cultural production: digital online culture. It focuses on the transformations or continuations that cultural products and practices such as hypermedia fictions, net.art and online performance art, as well as blogs, films, databases and other genre-defying web-based projects, perform with respect to Latin American(ist) discourses, as well as their often contestatory positioning with respect to Western hegemonic discourses as they circulate online. The intellectual rationale for the volume is located at the crossroads of two, equally important, theoretical strands: theories of digital culture, in their majority the product of the anglophone academy; and contemporary debates on Latin American identity and culture.
Categories: Social Science

Popular Culture New Media and Digital Literacy in Early Childhood

Popular Culture  New Media and Digital Literacy in Early Childhood

Ritual , performance and identity construction Young children's engagement with
popular cultural and media texts Jackie Marsh Given the growing evidence of the
central role that popular culture and media play in many young children's lives ...

Author: Jackie Marsh

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0415335736

Category: Education

Page: 245

View: 847

This book offers a range of perspectives on children's multimodal experiences, providing a ground-breaking account of the ways in which children engage with popular culture, media and digital literacy practices from their earliest years. Many young children have extensive experience of film, television, printed media, computer games, mobile phones and the Internet from birth, yet their reaction to media texts is rarely acknowledged in the national curricula of any country. This seminal text focuses on children from birth to eight years, addressing issues such as: * media and identity construction * media literacy practices in the home * the changing nature of literacy in technologically advanced societies * The place of popular and media texts in children's lives and the use of such texts in the curriculum. By exploring children's engagement with popular culture, media and digital texts in the home, community and early years settings, the contributors look at empirical studies from around the world, and draw out vital new theoretical issues relating to children's emergent techno-literacy practices. With an unmatchable team of international experts evaluating topics from text-messaging to the Teletubbies, this book is a long-overdue, fascinating and illuminating read for policy-makers, educational researchers and practitioners, and crosses over to appeal to those in the linguistics field.
Categories: Education

The Year s Work in Medievalism 2011

The Year   s Work in Medievalism  2011

Traxel, “Medieval and Psuedo-Medieval Elements in Computer Role-Playing
Games,” 127. 12. Hilde G. Corneliussen and Jill Walker Rettberg, eds., Digital
Culture, Play, and Identity: A World of Warcraft Reader (Cambridge, MA: The MIT
 ...

Author: Edward L. Risden

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781621899013

Category: History

Page: 110

View: 225

The Year's Work in Medievalism includes vetted essays from the Studies in Medievalism--now International Society for the Study of Medievalism--annual conference and from submissions to the editor throughout the year. The current volume includes a range of topics from medievalism in literature and art to the neomedievalism of movies and games. It includes these scholarly contributions: E. L. Risden, Introductory Letter from the Editor Gwendolyn Morgan, Recollections of Medievalism Richard Utz, Them Philologists: Philological Practices and Their Discontents from Nietzsche to Cerquiglini Clare Simmons, Really Ancient Druids in British Medievalist Drama Karl Fugelso, Neomedievalisms in Tom Phillips' Commedia Illustrations Jason Fisher, Some Contributions to Middle-earth Lexicography: Hapax Legomena in The Lord of the Rings Simon Roffey, The World of Warcraft: A Medievalist Perspective William Hodapp, Arthur, Beowulf, Robin Hood, and Hollywood's Desire for Origins M. J. Toswell, The Arthurian Landscapes of Guy Gavriel Kay
Categories: History