Democracy in California

Politics and Government in the Golden State

Author: Brian P. Janiskee,Ken Masugi

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 1442203382

Category: Political Science

Page: 159

View: 2491

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Examines the politics and character of California's governmental institutions and discusses how they impact the lives of its citizens.
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Local Government in Early America

The Colonial Experience and Lessons from the Founders

Author: Brian P. Janiskee

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1442201347

Category: History

Page: 185

View: 7909

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In Local Government in Early America, Brian P. Janiskee examines the origins of the "town hall meeting" and other iconic political institutions, whose origins lie in our colonial heritage. This work offers an overview of the structure of local politics in the colonial era, a detailed examination of the thoughts of key founders--such as John Adams and Thomas Jefferson--on local politics, and some thoughts on the continued role of local institutions as vital elements of the American political system.
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Governing California

Politics, Government, and Public Policy in the Golden State

Author: Bruce E. Cain

Publisher: University of California Inst of

ISBN: N.A

Category: Political Science

Page: 247

View: 8904

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California Politics and Government: A Practical Approach

Author: Larry Gerston,Terry Christensen

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 0495566500

Category: Political Science

Page: 160

View: 7581

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Taking a unique nuts-and-bolts approach, the concise CALIFORNIA POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT: A PRACTICAL APPROACH, 10E, gives students insight into real-life politics as it vividly illustrates the complex principles at work in state government. Current examples and clear explanations give students a solid understanding of the ins and outs of the California government. Thoroughly updated, the new edition addresses many complex economic, social, education, and immigration issues and their impact on state politics. The tenth edition includes new court cases, updates on the ongoing budget crisis, coverage of the 2008 elections, changes in government regulations, and more. In addition, public policy coverage is thoroughly integrated throughout the text, helping students make connections and see firsthand the impact and practical applications of government and legislation on their own lives. Clear, concise, and straightforward, CALIFORNIA POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT: A PRACTICAL APPROACH, 10E, equips students with a solid understanding of how government and politics really work as well as how they affect the students' world now and in the future. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
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Race and Redistricting in the 1990s

Author: Bernard Grofman

Publisher: Algora Publishing

ISBN: 0875862659

Category: Law

Page: 420

View: 5583

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A portrait of how the 1990s round of redistricting treated the racial and linguistic minorities that had been given special protections by the Voting Rights Act of 1965, primarily African-Americans, but also Native Americans, Asian-Americans, and those of Spanish heritage. Throughout the volume, the primary focus is on the practical politics of redistricting and its consequences for racial representation. Almost all the authors have been directly involved in the 1990s redistricting process either as a legislator, a member of the Voting Rights Section of the Justice Department, a member of a districting commission, or, most commonly, as an expert witness or lawyer in voting rights cases. All bring to bear special insights as well as insider knowledge of Congressional and state redistricting.
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California Politics and Government: A Practical Approach

Author: Larry Gerston,Terry Christensen

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 1133587658

Category: Political Science

Page: 192

View: 2859

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Taking a unique nuts-and-bolts approach, CALIFORNIA POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT gives insight into real-life politics as it vividly illustrates the complex principles at work in state government. Current examples and clear explanations give readers a solid understanding of the ins and outs of California government. Thoroughly updated, the new edition addresses many complex economic, social, education, and immigration issues and their impact on state politics. It includes new court cases, updates on the ongoing budget crisis, coverage of the 2012 elections, changes in government regulations, and more. In addition, public policy coverage is thoroughly integrated throughout the text, helping readers make connections and see firsthand the impact and practical applications of government and legislation in their own lives. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
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A Government by the People

Direct Democracy in America, 1890-1940

Author: Thomas Goebel

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807860182

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 7863

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Between 1898 and 1918, many American states introduced the initiative, referendum, and recall--known collectively as direct democracy. Most interpreters have seen the motives for these reform measures as purely political, but Thomas Goebel demonstrates that the call for direct democracy was deeply rooted in antimonopoly sentiment. Frustrated with the governmental corruption and favoritism that facilitated the rise of monopolies, advocates of direct democracy aimed to check the influence of legislative bodies and directly empower the people to pass laws and abolish trusts. But direct democracy failed to achieve its promises: corporations and trusts continued to flourish, voter turnout rates did not increase, and interest groups grew stronger. By the 1930s, it was clear that direct democracy favored large organizations with the financial and organizational resources to fund increasingly expensive campaigns. Recent years have witnessed a resurgence of direct democracy, particularly in California, where ballot questions and propositions have addressed such volatile issues as gay rights and affirmative action. In this context, Goebel's analysis of direct democracy's history, evolution, and ultimate unsuitability as a grassroots tool is particularly timely.
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Civic Wars

Democracy and Public Life in the American City During the Nineteenth Century

Author: Mary P. Ryan

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520204416

Category: Political Science

Page: 376

View: 9998

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Mary P. Ryan traces the fate of public life and the emergence of ethnic, class, and gender conflict in the nineteenth-century city in this ambitious retelling of a key period of American political and social history. Basing her analysis on three quite different cities--New York, New Orleans, and San Francisco--Ryan illustrates how city spaces were used, understood, and fought over by a dazzling variety of social groups and political forces. She finds that the democratic exuberance America enjoyed in the 1820s and 1840s was irrevocably damaged by the Civil War. Civic life rebounded after the War but was, in Ryan's words, "less public, less democratic, and more visibly scarred by racial bigotry." Ryan's analysis is played out on three different levels--the spatial, the ceremonial, and the political. As she follows the decline of informal democracy from the age of Jackson to the heyday of industrial capitalism, she finds the roots of America's resilient democratic culture in the vigorous, often belligerent urban conflicts that found expression in the social movements, riots, celebrations, and other events that punctuated daily life in these urban centers. With its insightful comparisons, meticulous research, and graceful narrative, this study illustrates the ways in which American cities of the nineteenth century were as full of cultural differences and as fractured by social and economic changes as any metropolis today. Mary P. Ryan traces the fate of public life and the emergence of ethnic, class, and gender conflict in the nineteenth-century city in this ambitious retelling of a key period of American political and social history. Basing her analysis on three quite different cities--New York, New Orleans, and San Francisco--Ryan illustrates how city spaces were used, understood, and fought over by a dazzling variety of social groups and political forces. She finds that the democratic exuberance America enjoyed in the 1820s and 1840s was irrevocably damaged by the Civil War. Civic life rebounded after the War but was, in Ryan's words, "less public, less democratic, and more visibly scarred by racial bigotry." Ryan's analysis is played out on three different levels--the spatial, the ceremonial, and the political. As she follows the decline of informal democracy from the age of Jackson to the heyday of industrial capitalism, she finds the roots of America's resilient democratic culture in the vigorous, often belligerent urban conflicts that found expression in the social movements, riots, celebrations, and other events that punctuated daily life in these urban centers. With its insightful comparisons, meticulous research, and graceful narrative, this study illustrates the ways in which American cities of the nineteenth century were as full of cultural differences and as fractured by social and economic changes as any metropolis today.
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