Decentering Citizenship

Gender, Labor, and Migrant Rights in South Korea

Author: Hae Yeon Choo

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 0804799660

Category: Social Science

Page: 200

View: 1351

Decentering Citizenship follows three groups of Filipina migrants' struggles to belong in South Korea: factory workers claiming rights as workers, wives of South Korean men claiming rights as mothers, and hostesses at American military clubs who are excluded from claims—unless they claim to be victims of trafficking. Moving beyond laws and policies, Hae Yeon Choo examines how rights are enacted, translated, and challenged in daily life and ultimately interrogates the concept of citizenship. Choo reveals citizenship as a language of social and personal transformation within the pursuit of dignity, security, and mobility. Her vivid ethnography of both migrants and their South Korean advocates illuminates how social inequalities of gender, race, class, and nation operate in defining citizenship. Decentering Citizenship argues that citizenship emerges from negotiations about rights and belonging between South Koreans and migrants. As the promise of equal rights and full membership in a polity erodes in the face of global inequalities, this decentering illuminates important contestation at the margins of citizenship.
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Disputing Citizenship

Author: John Clarke,Kathleen Coll,Evelina Dagnino,Catherine Neveu

Publisher: Policy Press

ISBN: 1447312538

Category: Political Science

Page: 214

View: 4034

Many people take citizenship for granted, but throughout history it has been an embattled notion. This unique book presents a new perspective on citizenship, treating it as a continuous focal point of dispute. Written by scholars from Brazil, France, Britain, and the United States, it offers an international and interdisciplinary exploration of the ways different forms and practices of citizenship embody contesting entanglements of politics, culture, and power. In doing so, it offers a provocative challenge to the ways citizenship is normally conceived of and analyzed by the social sciences and develops an innovative view of citizenship as something always emerging from struggle.
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Semblances of Sovereignty

The Constitution, the State, and American Citizenship

Author: Thomas Alexander ALEINIKOFF,Thomas Alexander Aleinikoff

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674020154

Category: Law

Page: 320

View: 2318

In a set of cases decided at the end of the nineteenth century, the Supreme Court declared that Congress had "plenary power" to regulate immigration, Indian tribes, and newly acquired territories. Not coincidentally, the groups subject to Congress' plenary power were primarily nonwhite and generally perceived as "uncivilized." The Court left Congress free to craft policies of assimilation, exclusion, paternalism, and domination. Despite dramatic shifts in constitutional law in the twentieth century, the plenary power case decisions remain largely the controlling law. The Warren Court, widely recognized for its dedication to individual rights, focused on ensuring "full and equal citizenship"--an agenda that utterly neglected immigrants, tribes, and residents of the territories. The Rehnquist Court has appropriated the Warren Court's rhetoric of citizenship, but has used it to strike down policies that support diversity and the sovereignty of Indian tribes. Attuned to the demands of a new century, the author argues for abandonment of the plenary power cases, and for more flexible conceptions of sovereignty and citizenship. The federal government ought to negotiate compacts with Indian tribes and the territories that affirm more durable forms of self-government. Citizenship should be "decentered," understood as a commitment to an intergenerational national project, not a basis for denying rights to immigrants. Table of Contents: 1. Introduction 2. The Sovereignty Cases and the Pursuit of an American Nation-State 3. The Citizen-State: From the Warren Court to the Rehnqnist Court 4. Commonwealth and the Constitution: The Case of Puerto Rico 5. The Erosion of American Indian Sovereignty 6. Indian Tribal Sovereignty beyond Plenary Power 7. Plenary Power, Immigration Regulation, and Decentered Citizenship 8. Reconceptualizing Sovereignty: Toward a New American Narrative Notes Index Reviews of this book: This book not only provides careful analysis of U.S. Supreme Court and congressional relationships but also could lead to novel studies of rights and obligations in American society. Highly recommended. --Steven Puro, Library Journal Reviews of this book: Aleinikoff examines sovereignty, citizenship, and the broader concept of membership (aliens as well as citizens) in the American nation-state and suggests that American constitutional law needs "understandings of sovereignty and membership that are supple and flexible, open to new arrangements"...Sure to generate heated debate over the extent to which the rules governing immigration, Indian tribes, and American territories should be altered, this book is required reading for constitutional scholars. --R. J. Steamer, Choice Amid the overflowing scholarship on American constitutional law, little has been written on this cluster of topics, which go to the core of what sovereignty under the Constitution means. Aleinikoff asks not only how we define "ourselves," but exactly who is authorized to place themselves in the category of insiders empowered to set limits excluding others. The book stands out as a novel, intriguing, and interesting analysis against the sea of sameness found in the constitutional literature. --Philip P. Frickey, Law School, University of California, Berkeley What lends Aleinikoff's work originality and importance is its synthetic range and the new insights that flow from bringing immigration, Indian, and territorial issues together, and taking on such much criticized anomalies as the plenary power doctrine in their full ambit. In my view, he may well make good on his hope of helping to inspire a new field of sovereignty studies. Certainly, the idea of "problematizing" national citizenship and national sovereignty is afoot in the law schools and, far more so, in sociology, political science, and in various interdisciplinary fields like American Studies, regional studies, and global political economiy and cultural studies. To my knowledge, no one has written a synthetic treatment of these issues that compares with Aleinikoff's in its mastery of constitutional law, its working knowledge or adjacent normative, historical and policy studies, and its intellectual clarity, stylistic grace, and morally sensitive but pragmatic political judgments. --William Forbath, University of Texas at Austin Law School
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Decentering International Relations

Author: Meghana Nayak,Eric Selbin

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Political Science

Page: 216

View: 9405

Through engagement with a variety of theories, conversations with scholars, activists, and students, and consultation of IR syllabi and conference proceedings, the authors invite the reader to participate in an accessible yet provocative experiment to decentre the North/West when we learn, study and do IR.
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China Off Center

Mapping the Margins of the Middle Kingdom

Author: Susan Debra Blum,Lionel M. Jensen

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 9780824825775

Category: Social Science

Page: 402

View: 3732

China Off Center takes as its fundamental assumption that contemporary China can only be understood as a complex, decentralized place, where the view from above (Beijing) and from tourist buses is a skewed one. Instead of generalizing about China, it demonstrates that this diverse national terrain is better conceived as it is experienced by Chinese, as a set of many Chinas. To that end, this anthology of interpretive essays and ethnographic reports focuses on the everyday, the particular, the local, and the puzzling. Among the many topics covered are ethnic minorities, linguistic diversity, competing regional loyalties, sexuality, gender and work, the floating populations, rock and roll, qigong (spiritual and martial arts), and popular religion. Together with contextualizing introductions, the readings provide students with a compelling look at some little-known but significant aspects of China from the past decade; for those already familiar with China, they furnish an assortment of uncommon viewpoints in a single, convenient volume.
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Gender and U.S. Immigration

Contemporary Trends

Author: Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520237391

Category: History

Page: 393

View: 3925

"An important collection of essays that goes beyond the 'immigrant women only' approach to present new perspectives and raise new questions about gender and contemporary U.S. immigration."—Nancy Foner, author of From Ellis Island to JFK: New York's Two Great Waves of Immigration "At last a book that puts gender front and center in debates about the U.S. immigration experience and provides those new to these discussions with an invaluable introduction to the field. Particularly impressive is the substantive breadth of the contributions in this volume, which range from scholarship on the work, family, and political lives of immigrants from all parts of the globe to studies of ethnic, racial, and generational identity. A much needed and essential addition to the bookshelf of any immigration scholar. "—Peggy Levitt, author of The Transnational Villagers "This collection of wonderfully innovative and insightful essays by a distinguished group of social scientists demonstrates the definitive and mutually constitutive connections linking immigration and gender in the contemporary United States. The processes and practices of immigration play a central role in shaping a distinctly gendered distribution of opportunity and suffering, while gendered social structures, preferences, practices, and personal networks play a definitive role in shaping the contours of the immigrant experience and its impact on social, cultural, and economic life."—George Lipsitz, author of American Studies in a Moment of Danger "Hondagneu-Sotelo has assembled some of the foremost scholars in international migration to address the critical yet long-neglected issue of gender. The essays cover topics from employment to motherhood, relate home and host in transnational experiences, and incorporate differences in race, ethnicity, generation, and age in their analyses. A truly remarkable volume."—Lucie Cheng, co-author of Linking Our Lives: Chinese American Women of Los Angeles "Edited by a leading pioneer of immigration studies, this volume offers some of the latest and most brilliant thinking about what migrant men and women bring to the United States, leave behind and create anew. This is a must read for those interested in immigration, gender, and the many meanings of life."—Arlie Russell Hochschild, co-editor with Barbara Ehrenreich of Global Woman: Nannies, Maids, and Sex Workers in the New Economy
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Handbook of Citizenship Studies

Author: Isin, Engin Fahri Isin,Professor Engin F Isin,Engin F Isin,Bryan S Turner,Professor Bryan S Turner

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 9780761968580

Category: Political Science

Page: 340

View: 7489

'The contributions of Woodiwiss, Lister and Sassen are outstanding but not unrepresentative of the many merits of this excellent collection'- The British Journal of Sociology From women's rights, civil rights, and sexual rights for gays and lesbians to disability rights and language rights, we have experienced in the past few decades a major trend in Western nation-states towards new claims for inclusion. This trend has echoed around the world: from the Zapatistas to Chechen and Kurdish nationalists, social and political movements are framing their struggles in the languages of rights and recognition, and hence, of citizenship. Citizenship has thus become an increasingly important axis in the social sciences. Social scientists have been rethinking the role of political agent or subject. Not only are the rights and obligations of citizens being redefined, but also what it means to be a citizen has become an issue of central concern. As the process of globalization produces multiple diasporas, we can expect increasingly complex relationships between homeland and host societies that will make the traditional idea of national citizenship problematic. As societies are forced to manage cultural difference and associated tensions and conflict, there will be changes in the processes by which states allocate citizenship and a differentiation of the category of citizen. This book constitutes the most authoritative and comprehensive guide to the terrain. Drawing on a wealth of interdisciplinary knowledge, and including some of the leading commentators of the day, it is an essential guide to understanding modern citizenship. About the editors: Engin F Isin is Associate Professor of Social Science at York University. His recent works include Being Political: Genealogies of Citizenship (Minnesota, 2002) and, with P K Wood, Citizens
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Policy change, public attitudes and social citizenship

Does neoliberalism matter?

Author: Humpage, Louise

Publisher: Policy Press

ISBN: 1447323513

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 3107

Neoliberal reforms have seen a radical shift in government thinking about social citizenship rights around the world. But have they had a similarly significant impact on public support for these rights? This unique book traces public views on social citizenship across three decades through attitudinal data from New Zealand, the United Kingdom and Australia. It argues that support for some aspects of social citizenship diminished more significantly under some political regimes than others, and that limited public resistance following the financial crisis of 2008-2009 further suggests the public ‘rolled over’ and accepted these neoliberal values. Yet attitudinal variances across different policy areas challenge the idea of an omnipotent neoliberalism, providing food for thought for academics, students and advocates wishing to galvanise support for social citizenship in the 21st century.
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Latin America and Contemporary Modernity

A Sociological Interpretation

Author: José Maurício Domingues

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135924791

Category: Social Science

Page: 210

View: 7684

In this book, renowned author José Maurício Domingues places Latin America within the third phase of global modern civilization and offers a general theoretical approach to contemporary Latin America. He sees modernity as configured by episodic modernizing moves which, when counting on strong identity and organization as well as clear-cut projects, may assume the aspect of modernizing offensives. Highlighting subjects as law, rights and justice as well as globalization and development, Dominguez places Latin America in the uneven, combined and contradictory development of modern civilization and offers a final assessment of its possibilities and limits. The book will be of interest to researchers and students of modernity, globalization, Latin America, sociological theory and its key concepts.
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