Darwin s Mentor

Darwin s Mentor

John Stevens Henslow, 1796-1861 S. M. Walters, E. A. Stow. 6 Educating Charles Darwin - and others In her excellent biography of the young Charles Darwin , Browne writes : Meeting ( Henslow ] was rightly considered by Darwin as the one ...

Author: S. M. Walters

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521591465

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 338

View: 521

A biography of the man best known for his formative influence on Charles Darwin; John Stevens Henslow.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Darwin s Armada

Darwin s Armada

E S. M. Walters & E. A. Stow, Darwin's Mentor, John Stevens Henslow, 1796-1861, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2001, pp. 78-107. A Nora Barlow, ed, Darwin and Henslow: The Growth of an Idea: Letters 1831—1860, London, ...

Author: Iain McCalman

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781847377180

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 673

Darwin's Armadatells the stories of Charles Darwin, Thomas Huxley, Joseph Hooker and Alfred Wallace, four young amateur naturalists from Britain who voyaged to the southern hemisphere during the first half of the nineteenth century in search of adventure and scientific fame. It charts their thrilling voyages to the strange and beautiful lands of the southern hemisphere that reshaped the young mariners' scientific ideas and led them, on returning to Britain, to befriend fellow voyager Charles Darwin. All three crucially influenced the publication and reception of his Origin of Speciesin 1859, one of the formative texts of the modern world. For the first time the Darwinian revolution of ideas is seen as a genuinely collective enterprise and one that had its birth in a series of gripping and human travel adventures. Many of the most urgent ecological and social issues of our times are seen to be prefigured in this compelling story of intellectual discovery.
Categories: History

Darwin s Mentor

Darwin s Mentor

Author: Stuart Max Walters

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:837120918

Category:

Page: 338

View: 806

Categories:

Darwin s Evolving Identity

Darwin s Evolving Identity

Browne, Charles Darwin: Voyaging, 80–88. 52. Sloan, “Darwin's Invertebrate Program”; Hodge, “Darwin as a Lifelong Generation Theorist.” 53. On the relationship between Darwin and Henslow see Walters and Stow, Darwin's Mentor. 54.

Author: Alistair Sponsel

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226523255

Category: Science

Page: 336

View: 846

Why—against his mentor’s exhortations to publish—did Charles Darwin take twenty years to reveal his theory of evolution by natural selection? In Darwin’s Evolving Identity, Alistair Sponsel argues that Darwin adopted this cautious approach to atone for his provocative theorizing as a young author spurred by that mentor, the geologist Charles Lyell. While we might expect him to have been tormented by guilt about his private study of evolution, Darwin was most distressed by harsh reactions to his published work on coral reefs, volcanoes, and earthquakes, judging himself guilty of an authorial “sin of speculation.” It was the battle to defend himself against charges of overzealous theorizing as a geologist, rather than the prospect of broader public outcry over evolution, which made Darwin such a cautious author of Origin of Species. Drawing on his own ambitious research in Darwin’s manuscripts and at the Beagle’s remotest ports of call, Sponsel takes us from the ocean to the Origin and beyond. He provides a vivid new picture of Darwin’s career as a voyaging naturalist and metropolitan author, and in doing so makes a bold argument about how we should understand the history of scientific theories.
Categories: Science

Darwin s Laboratory

Darwin s Laboratory

4 5 6 The Autobiography of Charles Darwin , 1809-1882 , with Original Omissions Restored , ed . ... John Stevens Henslow , Darwin's mentor at Cambridge University , compiled a paper to read at a meeting of the Cambridge Philosophical ...

Author: Roy M. MacLeod

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 0824816137

Category: Nature

Page: 540

View: 174

No scientific traveler was more influenced by the Pacific than Charles Darwin, and his legacy in the region remains unparalleled. Yet the extent of the Pacific's impact on the thought of Darwin and those who followed him has not been sufficiently grasped. In this volume of essays, sixteen scholars explore the many dimensions - biological, geological, anthropological, social, and political - of Darwinism in the Pacific. Fired by Darwinian ideas, nineteenth-century naturalists within and around the Pacific rim worked to further Darwin's programs in their own research: in Seattle, conchologist P. Brooks Randolph; in Honolulu, evolutionist John Thomas Gulick; in Adelaide, botanist Richard Schomburgk; and in Malaysia, biogeographer Alfred Russel Wallace. Lesser-known enthusiasts furnished Darwin with fresh material and replied to his endless inquiries, while young aspiring biologists from Cambridge tested Darwinian ideas directly in the "laboratory" of the Pacific. But the implications of Darwinism for the understanding of human nature and history turned it into a public theory as well as a scientific one. Anthropologists, geographers, missionaries, politicians, and social commentators - from Australia to Japan - all found ways to adapt Darwinism to their own agendas. Darwin's Laboratory demonstrates the variety and richness of Darwinian ideas in the Pacific and, in so doing, shows how the region functioned as a testing ground for the theory of evolution. Further, it illustrates how Darwinian ideas and their European contexts helped invent and define the particular conception we have of the Pacific. Both the general reader and the specialist will find controversy, illumination, and entertainment in this, the first book to probe the extent of Darwinism and Darwinian thinking in the Pacific.
Categories: Nature

Darwin s Psychology

Darwin s Psychology

205 'The present is the key to the past' is a credo sometimes associated with uniformitarianism , a geological purview traceable to Darwin's mentor Chares Lyell, among others. But see Martin Rudwick , 'The Strategy of Lyell's Principles ...

Author: Ben Bradley

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191017902

Category: Psychology

Page: 304

View: 254

Darwin has long been hailed as forefather to behavioural science, especially nowadays, with the growing popularity of evolutionary psychologies. Yet, until now, his contribution to the field of psychology has been somewhat understated. This is the first book ever to examine the riches of what Darwin himself wrote about psychological matters. It unearths a Darwin new to contemporary science, whose first concern is the agency of organisms — from which he derives both his psychology, and his theory of evolution. A deep reading of Darwin's writings on climbing plants and babies, blushing and bower-birds, worms and facial movements, shows that, for Darwin, evolution does not explain everything about human action. Group-life and culture are also keys, whether we discuss the dynamics of conscience or the dramas of desire. Thus his treatment of facial actions sets out from the anatomy and physiology of human facial movements, and shows how these gain meanings through their recognition by others. A discussion of blushing extends his theory to the way reading others' expressions rebounds on ourselves — I care about how I think you read me. This dynamic proves central to how Darwin understands sexual desire, the production of conscience and of social standards through group dynamics, and the role of culture in human agency. Presenting a new Darwin to science, and showing how widely Darwin's understanding of evolution and agency has been misunderstood and misrepresented in biology and the social sciences, this important new book lights a new way forward for those who want to build psychology on the foundation of evolutionary biology
Categories: Psychology

Darwin s Fossils

Darwin s Fossils

... Darwin's mentor John Stevens Henslow had agreed to receive and store his collections in Cambridge. From his letters to Henslow during the voyage, around nine different shipments can be identified between August 1832 and April 1835, ...

Author: Adrian Lister

Publisher: Smithsonian Institution

ISBN: 9781588346179

Category: Nature

Page: 160

View: 962

Reveals how Darwin's study of fossils shaped his scientific thinking and led to his development of the theory of evolution. Darwin's Fossils is an accessible account of Darwin's pioneering work on fossils, his adventures in South America, and his relationship with the scientific establishment. While Darwin's research on Galápagos finches is celebrated, his work on fossils is less well known. Yet he was the first to collect the remains of giant extinct South American mammals; he worked out how coral reefs and atolls formed; he excavated and explained marine fossils high in the Andes; and he discovered a fossil forest that now bears his name. All of this research was fundamental in leading Darwin to develop his revolutionary theory of evolution. This richly illustrated book brings Darwin's fossils, many of which survive in museums and institutions around the world, together for the first time. Including new photography of many of the fossils--which in recent years have enjoyed a surge of scientific interest--as well as superb line drawings produced in the nineteenth century and newly commissioned artists' reconstructions of the extinct animals as they are understood today, Darwin's Fossils reveals how Darwin's discoveries played a crucial role in the development of his groundbreaking ideas.
Categories: Nature

Darwin S Racism

Darwin   S Racism

Others, including Darwin's mentor Charles Lyell, had written about it, but as Darwin said in the abstract of this theory which he sent to his friend Asa Gray, American botanist, on September 5, 1857, these others "have written strongly ...

Author: Leon Zitzer

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN: 9781491791271

Category: History

Page: 806

View: 815

Throughout the 19th century in the British Empire, parallel developments in science and the law were squeezing Aborigines everywhere into nonexistence. Charles Darwin took part in this. Again and again, he expressed his approval of the extermination of the native lower races. The more interesting part of the story is that there were plenty of voices, albeit a minority and mostly forgotten now, who objected on humanitarian grounds (and sometimes scientific grounds as well). Europeans, they said, were becoming polished savages and dehumanizing the Other. Darwin was very aware of this criticism and cared not one whit. As he said in a letter to Charles Lyell, I care not much whether we are looked at as mere savages in a remotely distant future. But he well knew it was not a remote future. He had read several writers who accused Europeans of being the real savages. For a brief moment in his youth in his Diary, he himself dabbled in such criticism, even though he already believed in the inferiority of indigenous peoples. That belief grew firmer as he matured. Darwin did not dispute humanitarians so much as he ignored them. Its a sad story. But oh those humanitarians, how they inspire.
Categories: History

Constraints and Creativity

Constraints and Creativity

Darwin had many mentors, his teachers at school and at Edinburgh and Cambridge. During his voyage on the Beagle, FitzRoy served as a mentor initiating Darwin into the new science of geology. But the most important learning came not from ...

Author: Feiwel Kupferberg

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108839617

Category: Education

Page: 300

View: 474

This book presents a new theoretical model, constraint theory, for how to study creativity using scientific methods and clarifying concepts.
Categories: Education

The Heretic in Darwin s Court

The Heretic in Darwin s Court

The meeting's chairman once again was Henslow , Darwin's mentor and a professor of mineralogy at Cambridge , whom Darwin considered " wise and judicious . " Not himself an evolutionist , he nevertheless supported free thought and ...

Author: Ross A. Slotten

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231130112

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 602

View: 782

During their lifetimes, Alfred Russel Wallace and Charles Darwin shared credit and fame for the independent and near-simultaneous discovery of natural selection. Together, the two men spearheaded one of the greatest intellectual revolutions in modern history, and their rivalry, usually amicable but occasionally acrimonious, forged modern evolutionary theory. Yet today, few people today know much about Wallace. The Heretic in Darwin's Court explores the controversial life and scientific contributions of Alfred Russel Wallace -- Victorian traveler, scientist, spiritualist, and co-discoverer with Charles Darwin of natural selection. After examining his early years, the biography turns to Wallace's twelve years of often harrowing travels in the western and eastern tropics, which place him in the pantheon of the greatest explorer-naturalists of the nineteenth century. Tracing step-by-step his discovery of natural selection -- a piece of scientific detective work as revolutionary in its implications as the discovery of the structure of DNA -- the book then follows the remaining fifty years of Wallace's eccentric and entertaining life. In addition to his divergence from Darwin on two fundamental issues -- sexual selection and the origin of the human mind -- he pursued topics that most scientific figures of his day conspicuously avoided, including spiritualism, phrenology, mesmerism, environmentalism, and life on Mars. Although there may be disagreement about his conclusions, Wallace's intellectual investigations into the origins of life, consciousness, and the universe itself remain some of the most inspired scientific accomplishments in history. This authoritative biography casts new light on the life and work of Alfred Russel Wallace and the importance of his twenty-five-year relationship with Charles Darwin.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography