History of Chinese Daoism

History of Chinese Daoism

In terms of history, this book begins with the founding of Daoism as a religion in the Han Dynasty-second century, C.E. However, the bulk of the book deals with Daoist activities in the period of Political Disunion (371-581) when China was ...

Author: Xitai Qing

Publisher: University Press of Amer

ISBN: UVA:X004472144

Category: Religion

Page: 640

View: 340

History of Chinese Daoism- Volume I employs a historical-descriptive method to trace the evolution of Chinese Daoism. This study assumes that Daoism as a religion is atavistic in the Chinese soil; it assimilated the myths and legends of ancient China and has continued to do so in its history. The relationship between Daoism and the state is also explored in depth. This study focuses on how Daoism functioned in the popular level of society, as well as in the elite level. In terms of history, this book begins with the founding of Daoism as a religion in the Han Dynasty-second century, C.E. However, the bulk of the book deals with Daoist activities in the period of Political Disunion (371-581) when China was divided between North and South.
Categories: Religion

Historical Dictionary of Daoism

Historical Dictionary of Daoism

This book is an excellent resource for students, researchers, and anyone wanting to know more about Daoism.

Author: Ronnie L. Littlejohn

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 9781538122747

Category: Religion

Page: 310

View: 164

Daoism is the oldest indigenous philosophic-spiritual tradition of China and one of the most ancient of the world’s spiritual structures. The name Daoism comes from the term dao, which means a “way” or a “road” through the field or woods to one’s village. It is also means the “way” to do something, such as how a master craftsman carves wood, makes a bell, or even butchers an ox. But dao is also a nominative in the history of Daoism, referring to the energizing process that permeates and animates all of reality and moves it along. However, both text and practice in this tradition insist that dao itself cannot be described in words; it is not God in the sense of Western philosophy or religion. Daoism has no supreme being, even if there is an extensive grammar about nominally self-conscious entities and powers for which the Chinese use the word “spirit” (shen). For example, the highest powers of Daoism are variously called Taishang Laojun (the deified Laozi), the Celestial Worthy of Primordial Beginning (Yuanshi tianzun), the Jade Emperor (Yuhuang Shangdi), or the Perfected Warrior (Zhenwu). But these are expressions of dao in specific shen; they are not identical to Dao, except in the most unique case—when Laozi, the putative founder of Daoism and author of its major work, Daodejing, is said to be one with the dao. Historical Dictionary of Daoism contains a chronology, an introduction, appendixes, an extensive bibliography, and more than 400 cross-referenced entries related to the Chinese belief and worldview known as Daoism, including dozens of Daoist terms, names, and practices. This book is an excellent resource for students, researchers, and anyone wanting to know more about Daoism.
Categories: Religion

Daoism in History

Daoism in History

Including contributions from the foremost scholars in the field, Daoism in History presents new and important research. These essays honour one of the pioneers of Daoist studies, Emeritus Professor Liu Ts'un-yan.

Author: Benjamin Penny

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134275281

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 216

Over the last decade there has been a marked increase in the study of Daoism especially in Japan, China and the West, with a new generation of scholars broadening our understanding of the religion. Including contributions from the foremost scholars in the field, Daoism in History presents new and important research. These essays honour one of the pioneers of Daoist studies, Emeritus Professor Liu Ts'un-yan. His major essay 'Was Celestial Master Zhang a Historical Figure?' addresses one of the pivotal questions in the entire history of Daoism and is included here as the final essay. In addition, a Chinese character glossary, bibliography and index conclude the book. The first in an exciting new series, this book presents brand new thinking on Daoism - a field now recognized as one of the most vital areas of research in Chinese history and the history of religions.
Categories: History

Taoist Ritual in Chinese Society and History

Taoist Ritual in Chinese Society and History

This is the first comprehensive English-language introduction to Taoist ritual both for the scholar and the general reader.

Author: John Lagerwey

Publisher: Macmillan Publishing Company

ISBN: UOM:39015019149148

Category: Religion

Page: 364

View: 942

This is the first comprehensive English-language introduction to Taoist ritual both for the scholar and the general reader. In this splendid account, Taoism is presented as a system of religious symbol and action deeply rooted in centuries of Chinese social life. In vivid detail, Lagerwey describes the intricacies of Taoist rituals as performed by a single Taoist priest in present-day Taiwan. With the methodology of a literary critic, he explains what the Taoist priests have done, and continue to do, as intercessors acting to protect their communities, and what these beliefs and practices mean to the followers.
Categories: Religion

Facets of Qing Daoism

Facets of Qing Daoism

" In addition, this volume contains a bibliography of all her publications and a detailed index.

Author: Monica Esposito

Publisher: UniversityMedia

ISBN: 9783906000077

Category: Religion

Page: 387

View: 563

As China is rapidly reemerging as the world’s dominant economic powerhouse that it had been until the mid-eighteenth century, interest in its religions and philosophies is on the rise. Just as the history and culture of Western civilizations can hardly be grasped without a measure of knowledge about Christianity, an understanding of Chinese civilization and its history seems impossible without some comprehension of Daoism. Though it has long been clear that modern Daoism has its roots in Daoist movements of the Qing dynasty (1644–1911), research on premodern Daoism had been largely neglected. Published in six languages (Italian, French, English, German, Chinese, and Japanese), the pioneering studies by Monica Esposito (1962-2011) on Qing Daoism have been instrumental in kindling keen scholarly interest both in the West and in China and Japan. This book presents corrected and augmented versions of three of Dr Esposito's seminal articles that had originally been published in English ("Daoism in the Qing," "The Longmen School and its Controversial History," and "Longmen Daoism in Qing China: Doctrinal Ideal and Local Reality") along with English versions of two articles that had hitherto only been available in Japanese and Chinese: "Beheading the Red Dragon: The Heart of Feminine Alchemy" and "An Example of Daoist and Tantric Interaction during the Qing Dynasty: The Longmen xinzong." In addition, this volume contains a bibliography of all her publications and a detailed index.
Categories: Religion

Demonic Warfare

Demonic Warfare

This unusual book establishes once and for all the importance of understanding the idealized realities of literary texts within a larger context of cultural practice and socio-political history.

Author: Mark R. E. Meulenbeld

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 9780824838447

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 579

Revealing the fundamental continuities that exist between vernacular fiction and exorcist, martial rituals in the vernacular language, Mark Meulenbeld argues that a specific type of Daoist exorcism helped shape vernacular novels in the late Ming dynasty (1368–1644). Focusing on the once famous novel Fengshen yanyi ("Canonization of the Gods"), the author maps out the general ritual structure and divine protagonists that it borrows from much older systems of Daoist exorcism. By exploring how the novel reflects the specific concerns of communities associated with Fengshen yanyi and its ideology, Meulenbeld is able to reconstruct the cultural sphere in which Daoist exorcist rituals informed late imperial "novels." He first looks at temple networks and their religious festivals. Organized by local communities for territorial protection, these networks featured martial narratives about the powerful and heroic deeds of the gods. He then shows that it is by means of dramatic practices like ritual, theatre, and temple processions that divine acts were embodied and brought to life. Much attention is given to local militias who embodied "demon soldiers" as part of their defensive strategies. Various Ming emperors actively sought the support of these local religious networks and even continued to invite Daoist ritualists so as to efficiently marshal the forces of local gods with their local demon soldiers into the official, imperial reserves of military power. This unusual book establishes once and for all the importance of understanding the idealized realities of literary texts within a larger context of cultural practice and socio-political history. Of particular importance is the ongoing dialog with religious ideology that informs these different discourses. Meulenbeld's book makes a convincing case for the need to debunk the retrospective reading of China through the modern, secular Western categories of "literature," "society," and "politics." He shows that this disregard of religious dynamics has distorted our understanding of China and that "religion" cannot be conveniently isolated from scholarly analysis.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Daoism in Early China

Daoism in Early China

This text considers the prevalence of Lao-Zhuang Daoism and Huang-Lao Daoism in late pre-imperial and early imperial Chinese traditional thought.

Author: Feng Cao

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137550941

Category: History

Page: 227

View: 341

This text considers the prevalence of Lao-Zhuang Daoism and Huang-Lao Daoism in late pre-imperial and early imperial Chinese traditional thought. The author uses unique excavated documents and literature to explore the Huang-Lao tradition of Daoist philosophy, which exerted a great influence on China ancient philosophy and political theories, from the Pre-Qin period to the Wei-Jin periods. It explains the original and significance of Huang-Lao Daoism, its history and fundamental characteristics, notably discussing the two sides of Huang-Lao, namely the role and function of Lao Zi and the Yellow Emperor, and discusses why the two can constitute a complementary relationship. It also provides a key study of the Mawangdui silk texts, bamboo slips of the Heng Xian, Fan Wu Liu Xing, considering both the theory of human Xing and of Qi.
Categories: History

The Emergence of Daoism

The Emergence of Daoism

This book presents the history of early Daoism, tracing the development of the tradition between the first and the fifth centuries CE. This book discusses the emergence of several Daoist movements during this period, including the ...

Author: Gil Raz

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136618055

Category: Political Science

Page: 304

View: 746

At the core of Daoism are ancient ideas concerning the Way, the fundamental process of existence (the Dao). Humans, as individuals and as a society, should be aligned with the Dao in order to attain the fullness of life and its potential. This book presents the history of early Daoism, tracing the development of the tradition between the first and the fifth centuries CE. This book discusses the emergence of several Daoist movements during this period, including the relatively well-known Way of the Celestial Master that appeared in the second century, and the Upper Clarity and the Numinous Treasure lineages that appeared in the fourth century. These labels are very difficult to determine socially, and they obscure the social reality of early medieval China, that included many more lineages. This book argues that these lineages should be understood as narrowly defined associations of masters and disciples, and it goes on to describe these diverse social groupings as ‘communities of practice’. Shedding new light on a complex and multifaceted phenomenon, the formation of Daoism as a new religion in early medieval China, this book presents a major step forward in Daoist Studies.
Categories: Political Science

Early Daoist Scriptures

Early Daoist Scriptures

This book will undoubtedly provide a better understanding of Daoism."—Isabelle Robinet, author of Taoist Meditation: The Mao-shan Tradition of Great Purity

Author: Stephen R. Bokenkamp

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520219311

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 502

View: 562

"A work of historic proportions. . . . A whole new world of ancient religious life is being opened to us here, and readers can trust Bokenkamp to guide them through that world."—Russell Kirkland, University of Georgia "Bokenkamp, whose previous works on Daoism are already deservedly well known and appreciated, presents complete translations of six major Daoist texts. His introductions to each of them delineate and elucidate some points of both the history and fundamental notions of Daoism, which so far have remained unclear or subject to debate. This book will undoubtedly provide a better understanding of Daoism."—Isabelle Robinet, author of Taoist Meditation: The Mao-shan Tradition of Great Purity
Categories: Body, Mind & Spirit

Dao and Sign in History

Dao and Sign in History

While many scholars have compared the earliest works of Daoism to language-skeptical movements in twentieth-century European philosophy and have debated to what degree early Daoism does or does not resemble these recent movements, Daniel ...

Author: Daniel Fried

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9781438471938

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 334

View: 502

Provides a new perspective on important linguistic issues in philosophical and religious Daoism through the comparative lens of twentieth-century European philosophies of language. From its earliest origins in the Dao De Jing, Daoism has been known as a movement that is skeptical of the ability of language to fully express the truth. While many scholars have compared the earliest works of Daoism to language-skeptical movements in twentieth-century European philosophy and have debated to what degree early Daoism does or does not resemble these recent movements, Daniel Fried breaks new ground by examining a much broader array of Daoist materials from ancient and medieval China and showing how these works influenced ideas about language in medieval religion, literature, and politics. Through an extended comparison with a broad sample of European philosophical works, the book explores how ideas about language grow out of a given historical moment and advances a larger argument about how philosophical and religious ideas cannot be divided into “content” and “context.” “Fried combines the disciplines of semiotics with a largely philosophical approach, thus offering fresh insights into both disciplines, while looking at issues from multiple perspectives.” — Steven Burik, author of The End of Comparative Philosophy and the Task of Comparative Thinking: Heidegger, Derrida, and Daoism
Categories: Literary Criticism

Introducing Daoism

Introducing Daoism

This book presents Daoism's key concepts and major practices in an integrated historical survey.

Author: Livia Kohn

Publisher: World Religions

ISBN: 0415439981

Category: Religion

Page: 276

View: 408

This book presents Daoism's key concepts and major practices in an integrated historical survey. From Daoism's origins in antiquity, through the Tang, Ming, and Quing dynasties, and into the present day, Livia Kohn explores Daoism's movements and schools, including: Daoist philosophy, the organized religion, and Daoist health practices. Each chapter introduces the main historical events of the period, the leading figures in Daoism, and Daoist scriptures and practices, as well as covering a wealth of fascinating topics such as Chinese cosmology, Daoist understanding of the body, rituals and doctrine, meditation, mythology, and poetry. Kohn also examines the connections between the defining concepts, history, and practices of Daoism, and key issues in Asian and Western comparative religions.
Categories: Religion

Daoist Identity

Daoist Identity

The volume then focuses on lineage formation and the increasing role of popular religious practices, such as spirit-writing, in modern Daoism since the Song dynasty.

Author: Livia Kohn

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 0824825047

Category: Philosophy

Page: 346

View: 287

Daoist Identity is an exploration of the various means by which Daoists over the centuries have created an identity for themselves. Using modern sociological studies of identity formation as its foundation, it brings together a representative sample of in-depth analyses by eminent American and Japanese scholars in the field. The discussion begins with critical examinations of the ways identity was found among the early movements of the Way of Great Peace and the Celestial Masters. The role of sacred texts and literary culture in Daoist identity formation is discussed. The volume then focuses on lineage formation and the increasing role of popular religious practices, such as spirit-writing, in modern Daoism since the Song dynasty. Finally it discusses the Daoist adaptation and reinterpretation of Buddhist rites, such as the feeding of souls in hell and the use of ritual gestures, and the changes made in contemporary Daoism in relation to traditional rites and popular practices. Contributors: Asano Haruji, Suzanne Cahill, M. Csikszentmihalyi, Edward L. Davis, Terry F. Kleeman, Livia Kohn, Mabuchi Masaya, Maruyama Hiroshi, Mitamura Keiko, Mori Yuria, Peter Nickerson, Charles D. Orzech, Harold D. Roth, Shiga Ichiko, Tsuchiya Masaaki.
Categories: Philosophy

Taoism For Dummies

Taoism For Dummies

The definitive guide to understanding Taoism—no matter your background or faith Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching is the second most translated book in the world, and the practice of religious Taoism is on the rise in China, where adherents ...

Author: Jonathan R. Herman

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118423967

Category: Religion

Page: 384

View: 847

An introduction to Taoism provides in-depth information on its origins, its underlying quietist principles, and its emergence as a major religion, and features both Eastern and Western interpretations.
Categories: Religion

The Way In Taoism

The Way In Taoism

Written in a user-friendly FAQ format, it's one of the most accessible guides to Taoism that can be found online. It's recommended for everyone who wants to learn about this subject.

Author: Danny Cataldi

Publisher: Independently Published

ISBN: 9798500439598

Category:

Page: 30

View: 804

If Confucianism is a system concerned with the social and communal elements of Chinese society, then Taoism is its exact opposite: this tradition is intimately concerned with private spiritual vision and attainment, with cosmology and metaphysics. Taoism (also spelled Daoism) is a life philosophy and practice of living in harmony with the Tao. Tao means 'way' or 'path' - a sort of double meaning, as both the 'way of Nature' and the 'way to happiness'. This brief introduction to Taoism explains its history, key concepts, and philosophy (or lack thereof) in simple, everyday language. Written in a user-friendly FAQ format, it's one of the most accessible guides to Taoism that can be found online. It's recommended for everyone who wants to learn about this subject.
Categories:

The Ethical Foundations of Early Daoism

The Ethical Foundations of Early Daoism

The Ethical Foundations of Early Daoism: Zhuangzi's Unique Moral Vision argues that we can read early Daoist texts as works of moral philosophy that speak to perennial concerns about the well-lived life in the context of the Way.

Author: Jung H. Lee

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137384867

Category: Philosophy

Page: 186

View: 246

The Ethical Foundations of Early Daoism: Zhuangzi's Unique Moral Vision argues that we can read early Daoist texts as works of moral philosophy that speak to perennial concerns about the well-lived life in the context of the Way. Lee argues that we can interpret early Daoism as an ethics of attunement.
Categories: Philosophy

Daoism in Modern China

Daoism in Modern China

This book questions whether temples and Daoism are two independent aspects of modern Chinese religion or if they are indissolubly linked.

Author: Vincent Goossaert

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317496304

Category: Social Science

Page: 278

View: 763

This book questions whether temples and Daoism are two independent aspects of modern Chinese religion or if they are indissolubly linked. It presents a useful analysis as to how modern history has changed the structure and organization of religious and social life in China, and the role that Daoism plays in this. Using an interdisciplinary approach combining historical research and fieldwork, this book focuses on urban centers in China, as this is where sociopolitical changes came earliest and affected religious life to the greatest extent and also where the largest central Daoist temples were and are located. It compares case studies from central, eastern, and southern China with published evidence and research on other Chinese cities. Contributors examine how Daoism interacted with traditional urban social, cultural, and commercial institutions and pays close attention to how it dealt with processes of state expansion, commercialization, migration, and urban development in modern times. This book also analyses the evolution of urban religious life in modern China, particularly the ways in which temple communities, lay urbanites, and professional Daoists interact with one another. A solid ethnography that presents an abundance of new historical information, this book will be of interest to academics in the field of Asian studies, Daoist studies, Asian religions, and modern China.
Categories: Social Science

Daoism

Daoism

The time is right for a broad overview of the history of Daoism in English. I.B.Tauris and my editor, Alex Wright, are to be commended for having the vision ...

Author: Ronnie L. Littlejohn

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9780857724526

Category: Religion

Page: 240

View: 370

'The way that can be told is not the eternal Way; the name that can be named is not the eternal Name.' So begins the first verse of the mysterious "Dao De Jing", foundation text of the ancient Chinese religion of Daoism. Often attributed to semi-mythical sage Laozi, the origins of this enigmatic document - which probably came into being in the third century BCE - are actually unknown. But the tenets of Daoism laid down in the "Dao De Jing", and in later texts like the "Yi Jing" (or "Book of Changes"), continue to exert considerable fascination, particularly in the West, where in recent years they have been popularised by writers such as the novelist Ursula K LeGuin.In this fresh and engaging introduction to Daoism, Ronnie L Littlejohn discusses the central facets of a tradition which can sometimes seem as elusive as the slippery notion of 'Dao' itself. The author shows that fundamental to Daoism is the notion of 'Wu-wei', or non-action: a paradoxical idea emphasising alignment of the self with the harmony of the universe, a universe in continual flux and change. This flux is expressed by the famous symbol of Dao, the 'taiji' representing yin and yang eternally correlating in the form of a harmonious circle. Exploring the great subtleties of this ancient religion, Littlejohn traces its development and encounters with Buddhism; its expression in art and literature; its fight for survival during the Cultural Revolution; and its manifestations in modern-day China and beyond.
Categories: Religion

Dao Companion to Xuanxue Neo Daoism

Dao Companion to Xuanxue         Neo Daoism

East Asian History, 2: 1–30. Hu, Fuchen 胡孚琛. 1989. Immortality Taoism in the Wei-Jin Period: A Study of the Baopuzi Neipian 魏晋神仙道教:抱朴子内篇研究.

Author: David Chai

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030492281

Category: Philosophy

Page: 529

View: 206

This comprehensive volume surveys an important but neglected period of Chinese intellectual history: Xuanxue (Neo-Daoism). It provides a holistic approach to the philosophical and religious traits of this movement via the concepts of non-being, being, and oneness. Thinkers and texts on the periphery of Xuanxue are also examined to show readers that Xuanxue did not arise in a vacuum but is the result of a long and continuous evolution of ideas from pre-Qin Daoism. The 25 chapters of this work survey the major philosophical figures and arguments of Xuanxue, a movement from the Wei-Jin dynastic period (220-420 CE) of early-medieval China. It also examines texts and figures from the late-Han dynasty whose influence on Xuanxue has yet to be made explicitly clear. In order to fully capture the multifaceted nature of this movement, the contributors brilliantly highlight its more socially-oriented characteristics. Overall, this volume presents an unrivaled picture of this exciting period. It details a portrait of intellectual and cultural vitality that rivals, if not surpasses, what was achieved during the Warring States period. Readers of the Yijing, Daodejing, and Zhuangzi will feel right at home with the themes and arguments presented herein, while students and those coming to Xuanxue for the first time will acquire a wealth of knowledge.
Categories: Philosophy

The Metaphysics of Philosophical Daoism

The Metaphysics of Philosophical Daoism

Drawing on evidence from a wide range of classical Chinese texts, this book argues that xingershangxue, the study of "beyond form", constitutes the core argument and intellectual foundation of Daoist philosophy.

Author: Kai Zheng

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429825613

Category: Philosophy

Page: 196

View: 819

Drawing on evidence from a wide range of classical Chinese texts, this book argues that xingershangxue, the study of "beyond form", constitutes the core argument and intellectual foundation of Daoist philosophy. The author presents Daoist xingershangxue as a typical concept of metaphysics distinct from that of the natural philosophy and metaphysics of ancient Greece since it focusses on understanding the world beyond perceivable objects and phenomena as well as names that are definable in their social, political, or moral structures. In comparison with other philosophical traditions in the East and West, the book discusses the ideas of dao, de, and "spontaneously self-so", which shows Daoist xingershangxue’s theoretical tendency to transcendence. The author explains the differences between Daoist philosophy and ancient Greek philosophy and proposes that Daoist philosophy is the study of xingershangxue in nature, providing a valuable resource for scholars interested in Chinese philosophy, Daoism, and comparative philosophy.
Categories: Philosophy