Cricket and Empire

Cricket and Empire

Author: Ric Sissons

Publisher:

ISBN: 1138026131

Category: Cricket

Page: 150

View: 490

Categories: Cricket

Cricket and Empire RLE Sports Studies

Cricket and Empire  RLE Sports Studies

This book offers a radical reappraisal of bodyline which challenges the official interpretations of the events, and places them in a unique social and political context. .

Author: Ric Sissons

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317680758

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 158

View: 459

A great depression, worsening Anglo-Australian relations, the declining British Empire and the challenge from an Australia striving to find a national identity are the context which explain bodyline and its repercussions. Bodyline was a watershed in the history of cricket and politics were publicly seen as part of sport. This book offers a radical reappraisal of bodyline which challenges the official interpretations of the events, and places them in a unique social and political context. .
Categories: Sports & Recreation

Empire War Cricket in South Africa

Empire  War   Cricket in South Africa

30 Remarkable perhaps, but also typical of the relationship that existed between
cricket and Britain's imperial expansion. Cricket had become part of the cultural
spread of the empire within southern Africa and now its influence had reached ...

Author: Dean Allen

Publisher: Penguin Random House South Africa

ISBN: 9781770228481

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 353

View: 772

Cecil John Rhodes once said he had only met two creators in South Africa: himself and James Douglas Logan, the Scottish-born founder of Matjiesfontein. Logan immigrated to South Africa in 1877 at the age of nineteen and almost immediately began amassing a fortune through business, politics and his high-profile association with that most favoured of imperial pastimes – cricket. Empire, War & Cricket in South Africa explores in detail how Matjiesfontein was created and how Logan developed this little Karoo town into a renowned health resort, attracting the rich and famous – including South African novelist Olive Schreiner and England cricketer George Lohmann. But, above all, this is the untold story of how James Logan was instrumental in developing the game of cricket in South Africa at a time when the country was heading towards war with the British Empire. In Empire, War & Cricket in South Africa, readers will learn how one of the first international cricket matches between South Africa and England took place at Matjiesfontein; explore the controversial 1901 South African cricket tour to England in the midst of the Anglo-Boer War; read the amazing story of how Logan once had the captain and manager of England’s cricket team arrested as they boarded their ship home; and discover Logan’s close relationship with Rhodes and how their ‘shady dealings’ brought down the premier’s first government. Illustrated throughout with rare photographs and documents, Empire, War & Cricket in South Africa is a unique social and political history of the workings of the British Empire in South Africa during the late nineteenth century; a well-researched and fascinating biography of the man who gave us Matjiesfontein; and an entertaining and at times unbelievable story of cricket’s origins in South Africa.
Categories: Sports & Recreation

Cricket Literature and Culture

Cricket  Literature and Culture

Chapter 4 Cricket, Literature and Empire 1850-1939 The Author hopes that every
reader will derive some pleasure from studying the pages of 'The Cricketer's
Companion,' and that it will help lay the foundation for a successful career in the ...

Author: Dr Anthony Bateman

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9781409475545

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 248

View: 287

In his important contribution to the growing field of sports literature, Anthony Bateman traces the relationship between literary representations of cricket and Anglo-British national identity from 1850 to the mid 1980s. Examining newspaper accounts, instructional books, fiction, poetry, and the work of editors, anthologists, and historians, Bateman elaborates the ways in which a long tradition of literary discourse produced cricket's cultural status and meaning. His critique of writing about cricket leads to the rediscovery of little-known texts and the reinterpretation of well-known works by authors as diverse as Neville Cardus, James Joyce, the Great War poets, and C.L.R. James. Beginning with mid-eighteenth century accounts of cricket that provide essential background, Bateman examines the literary evolution of cricket writing against the backdrop of key historical moments such as the Great War, the 1926 General Strike, and the rise of Communism. Several case studies show that cricket simultaneously asserted English ideals and created anxiety about imperialism, while cricket's distinctively colonial aesthetic is highlighted through Bateman's examination of the discourse surrounding colonial cricket tours and cricketers like Prince Kumar Shri Ranjitsinhji of India and Sir Learie Constantine of Trinidad. Featuring an extensive bibliography, Bateman's book shows that, while the discourse surrounding cricket was key to its status as a symbol of nation and empire, the embodied practice of the sport served to destabilise its established cultural meaning in the colonial and postcolonial contexts.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Globalizing Cricket

Globalizing Cricket

Cricket's literature is replete with quotes linking cricket and Empire. For instance,
in 1880 Lord Harris claimed that 'the game of cricket has done more to draw the
Mother Country and the Colonies together than years of beneficial legislation ...

Author: Dominic Malcolm

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9781849665278

Category: Political Science

Page: 208

View: 897

Globalizing Cricket examines the global role of cricket's of development, diffusion of cricket through colonization, and impact on the changing notions of English national identity.
Categories: Political Science

Empire Cricket

Empire   Cricket

The role of sport generally , and cricket particularly , in the British imperial project
has given rise to a fascinating literature , with the volumes edited by J . A .
Mangan , The Cultural Bond : Sport , Empire , Society ( London : Frank Cass ,
1992 ) ...

Author: Abebe Zegeye

Publisher: Unisa Press

ISBN: STANFORD:36105133087010

Category: History

Page: 326

View: 385

European and African works have found it difficult to move past the image of Africa as a place of exotica and relentless brutality. This book explores the status and critical relationship between politics, culture, literary creativity, criticism, education and publishing in the context of promoting Africa' s indigenous knowledge, and seeks to recover some of the sites where Africans continue to elaborate conflicting politics of self-affirmations. Itboth acknowledges and steps outside the protocols of analysis informed by ...
Categories: History

British Culture and the End of Empire

British Culture and the End of Empire

CHAPTER SIX The imperial game in crisis : English cricket and decolonisation
Mike Cronin and Richard Holt In 1993 , the then British Prime Minister , John
Major , made a speech ncapsulating his policies concerning further European ...

Author: Stuart Ward

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 0719060486

Category: History

Page: 241

View: 240

The demise of the British Empire in the three decades following the Second World War is a theme that has been well traversed in studies of post-war British politics, economics and foreign relations. Yet there has been strikingly little attention to the question of how these dramatic changes in Britain's relationships with the wider world were reflected in British culture. This volume addresses this central issue, arguing that the social and cultural impact of decolonisation had as significant an effect on the imperial centre as on the colonial periphery. Far from being a matter of indifference or resigned acceptance as is often suggested, the fall of the British Empire came as a profound shock to the British national imagination, and resonated widely in British popular culture.
Categories: History

Cricket and England

Cricket and England

A Cultural and Social History of Cricket in England between the Wars Mr Jack
Williams ... 13 Cricket and Empire: The 1932–33 Bodyline Tour ofAustraliaby
RicSissons and Brian Stoddart has shown that the significance accorded to
cricket as ...

Author: Mr Jack Williams

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136317200

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 248

View: 541

Looking at the inter-war period, this work explores the relationship between cricket and English social and cultural values.
Categories: Sports & Recreation

Bodyline Autopsy

Bodyline Autopsy

47 48 Quoted in Cricket and Empire, Sissons and Stoddart, p. 125 Revealed by
his son in a 1995 interview by Charles Williams: Bradman, p. 117 Letter in MCC
archives 49 CHAPTER 14 CONSEQUENCES 1 2 4 5 6 7 8 Cricket My World, ...

Author: David Frith

Publisher: Aurum

ISBN: 9781781311936

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 480

View: 917

In 1932, England’s cricket team, led by the haughty Douglas Jardine, had the fastest bowler in the world: Harold Larwood. Australia boasted the most prolific batsman the game had ever seen: the young Don Bradman. He had to be stopped. The leg-side bouncer onslaught inflicted by Larwood and Bill Voce, with a ring of fieldsmen waiting for catches, caused an outrage that reverberated to the back of the stands and into the highest levels of government. Bodyline, as this infamous technique came to be known, was repugnant to the majority of cricket-lovers. It was also potentially lethal – one bowl fracturing the skull of Australian wicketkeeper Bert Oldfield – and the technique was outlawed in 1934. After the death of Don Bradman in 2001, one of the most controversial events in cricketing history – the Bodyline technique - finally slid out of living memory. Over seventy years on, the 1932-33 Ashes series remains the most notorious in the history of Test cricket between Australia and England. David Frith’s gripping narrative has been acclaimed as the definitive book on the whole saga: superbly researched and replete with anecdotes, Bodyline Autopsy is a masterly anatomy of one of the most remarkable sporting scandals.
Categories: Sports & Recreation

Industry Reform and Empire Britain 1750 1900

Industry  Reform and Empire Britain 1750 1900

... post boxes , even the basic rules of sports like rugby , cricket and football -
came from the period covered in this book . Read this section carefully . It doesn't
feature all the changes , discoveries and inventions that took place between
1750 ...

Author: Aaron Wilkes

Publisher: Folens Limited

ISBN: 1843034093

Category: Great Britain

Page: 128

View: 782

Folens history is a new course for delivering KS3 history that supports many of the approaches identified in the Foundation Subject Strand of the National Strategy for KS3. Ideal for a mixed ability group.
Categories: Great Britain

The Making of New Zealand Cricket

The Making of New Zealand Cricket

Pullin, A.W., Alfred Shaw: Cricketer: His Career and Reminiscences (London,
1902). Raphael, F.C. (comp.) ... Sissons, R. and Stoddart, B., Cricket and Empire:
The 1932–33 Bodyline Tour of Australia (London, 1984). Skelton, W.E., Not ...

Author: Greg Ryan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135754822

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 280

View: 383

It is generally forgotten that cricket rather than rugby union was the 'national game' in New Zealand until the early years of the twentieth century. This book shows why and how cricket developed in New Zealand and how its character changed across time. Greg Ryan examines the emergence and growth of cricket in relation to diverse patterns of European settlement in New Zealand - such as the systematic colonization schemes of Edward Gibbon Wakefield and the gold discoveries of the 1860s. He then considers issues such as cricket and social class in the emerging cities; cricket and the elite school system; the function of the game in shaping relations between the New Zealand provinces; cricket encounters with the Australian colonies in the context of an 'Australasian' world. A central theme is cricketing relations with England at a time when New Zealand society was becoming acutely conscious of both its own identity and its place within the British Empire. This imperial relationship reveals structures, ideals and objectives unique to New Zealand. Articulate, engaging and entertaining, Ryan demonstrates convincingly how the cricketing experience of New Zealand was quite different from that of other colonies.
Categories: Sports & Recreation

Cricket and Race

Cricket and Race

touring team to England that “The Princes of India have been very old members
of Great Britain's teams; and both on easy wickets and difficult wickets they have
tried their best to play with a straight bat for the Empire.” He saw cricket as ...

Author: Jack Williams

Publisher: Berg Pub Limited

ISBN: UOM:39015047467322

Category: Social Science

Page: 231

View: 177

Because cricket is often regarded as a symbol of Englishness, the role of race in the sport provides penetrating insights into English national identity. This book provides an historical overview of the links between cricket, race and culture.
Categories: Social Science

Cricket and the Victorians

Cricket and the Victorians

CHAPTER EIGHT Cricket and Empire The British empire expanded by leaps and
bounds during the Victorian age . By the beginning of the twentieth century , it
contained at least 660 million souls and was spread over more than 12 million ...

Author: Keith A. P. Sandiford

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: UOM:39015034009152

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 207

View: 515

A contribution to the social history of 19th-century England, examining cricket's emergence as the national sport and its rapid spread to the rest of the empire. Emphasizes the relationship of the game to the Victorian mores and ethos and the role of religious and academic institutions in promoting
Categories: Sports & Recreation

Sport in Capitalist Society

Sport in Capitalist Society

29 James's writings on cricket are collected in his A Majestic Innings: Writings on
Cricket, London, 2006. 30 Quoted in Guha, A Corner of a Foreign Field, p. 61. 31
Quoted in Allen Guttmann, Games and Empires, p. 87. 32 Quoted in Guha, ...

Author: Tony Collins

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135081980

Category: History

Page: 184

View: 408

Why are the Olympic Games the driving force behind a clampdown on civil liberties? What makes sport an unwavering ally of nationalism and militarism? Is sport the new opiate of the masses? These and many other questions are answered in this new radical history of sport by leading historian of sport and society, Professor Tony Collins. Tracing the history of modern sport from its origins in the burgeoning capitalist economy of mid-eighteenth century England to the globalised corporate sport of today, the book argues that, far from the purity of sport being ‘corrupted’ by capitalism, modern sport is as much a product of capitalism as the factory, the stock exchange and the unemployment line. Based on original sources, the book explains how sport has been shaped and moulded by the major political and economic events of the past two centuries, such as the French Revolution, the rise of modern nationalism and imperialism, the Russian Revolution, the Cold War and the imposition of the neo-liberal agenda in the last decades of the twentieth century. It highlights the symbiotic relationship between the media and sport, from the simultaneous emergence of print capitalism and modern sport in Georgian England to the rise of Murdoch’s global satellite television empire in the twenty-first century, and for the first time it explores the alternative, revolutionary models of sport in the early twentieth century. Sport in a Capitalist Society is the first sustained attempt to explain the emergence of modern sport around the world as an integral part of the globalisation of capitalism. It is essential reading for anybody with an interest in the history or sociology of sport, or the social and cultural history of the modern world.
Categories: History

The Cultural Bond

The Cultural Bond

CHAPTER TWO The MCC, Society and Empire: A Portrait of Cricket's Ruling
Body, 1860-1914 JAMES BRADLEY In 1987 the Marylebone Cricket Club
celebrated its bicentenary and to mark the occasion the ex-Glamorgan and
England ...

Author: J.A. Mangan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135024376

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 228

View: 811

The contributors to this volume examine the aspects of the cultural associations, symbolic interpretations and emotional significance of the idea of empire and, to some extent, with the post-imperial consequences. Collectively and cumulatively, their view is that sport was an important instrument of imperial cultural association and subsequent cultural change, promoting at various times and in various places imperial unity, national identity, social reform, recreational development and post-imperial goodwill.
Categories: Sports & Recreation

Empire s Crossroads

Empire s Crossroads

Perhaps the most important cultural phenomenon of all, beyond literature andart,
oreven Carnival, is something akin to areligion: cricket. Cricket remains
enormously popular at home and among the diaspora. As Trinidadian historian
C.L. R. ...

Author: Carrie Gibson

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 9780230766181

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 179

In Empire's Crossroads, Carrie Gibson offers readers a vivid, authoritative and action-packed history of the Caribbean. For Gibson, everything was created in the West Indies: the Europe of today, its financial foundations built with sugar money: the factories and mills built as a result of the work of slaves thousands of miles away; the idea of true equality as espoused in Saint Domingue in the 1790s; the slow progress to independence; and even globalization and migration, with the ships passing to and fro taking people and goods in all possible directions, hundreds of years before the term 'globalization' was coined. From Cuba to Haiti, from Dominica to Martinique, from Jamaica to Trinidad, the story of the Caribbean is not simply the story of slaves and masters - but of fortune-seekers and pirates, scientists and servants, travellers and tourists. It is not only a story of imperial expansion - European and American - but of global connections, and also of life as it is lived in the islands, both in the past and today.
Categories: History

Crosspatch the Cricket and the Counterpane

Crosspatch the Cricket and the Counterpane

BY THE AUTHOR OF “ TRIUMPHS OF STEAM , " ETC . Meadow Lea ; Or , the
Gipsy Children ; a Story founded on fact . By the Author of “ The Triumphs of
Steam , " “ Our Eastern Empire , ” etc . With Illustra . tions by John GILBERT . Fcap
.

Author: Frances Freeling Broderip

Publisher:

ISBN: OXFORD:600071924

Category: Children's poetry

Page: 188

View: 951

Categories: Children's poetry

Making the Rugby World

Making the Rugby World

Yet, beyond these two societies and the South Pacific Islands of the British
Empire, rugby never became as universal as did soccer and cricket in the rest of
the Empire. Tony Mason recounts how modern football began in India with the ...

Author: Timothy J.L. Chandler

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135227227

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 256

View: 173

This book explores the expansion of rugby from its imperial and amateur upper-class white male core into other contexts throughout the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The development of rugby in the racially divided communities of the setter empire and how this was viewed are explored initially. Then the editors turn to four case studies of rugby's expansion beyond the bounds of the British Empire (France, Italy, Japan and the USA). The role of women in rugby is examined and the subsequent development of women's rugby as one of the fastest growing sports for women in Europe, North America and Australasia in the 1980s and 1990s. The final section analyses the impact of commercialisation, professionalisation and media on rugby and the impact on the historic rugby culture linked to an ethos of amateurism.
Categories: Sports & Recreation

United Empire

United Empire

I should like to say before concluding that while in West Africa I started the idea of
a black cricket team being sent home to England . My friend Major Guggisberg , a
well - known member of the M . C . C . , who was in West Africa at the time and ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:B2902442

Category:

Page:

View: 483

Categories:

Lost Histories of Indian Cricket

Lost Histories of Indian Cricket

Empire. vs. Parsee. XI. Cricket in India has largely been looked upon as an alien
sport appropriated as part of an emulative enterprise. The close link, if any,
between cricket and nationalism is regarded as a contemporary phenomenon.

Author: Boria Majumdar

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134243365

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 168

View: 279

Lost Histories of Indian Cricket studies the personalities and controversies that have shaped Indian cricket over the years and brings to life the intensity surrounding India's national game. It may be true that that cricket today arouses more passions in India than in any other cricket playing country in the world. Yet, when it comes to writing on the history of the game, Indians have been reticent and much of the past has been obscured and lost. Majumdar here recovers this history and restores it to its rightful place in India's rich sporting heritage.
Categories: Sports & Recreation