Corinth

The History and Legacy of the Ancient Greek City-state

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781977597991

Category:

Page: 46

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*Includes pictures *Includes ancient accounts of Corinth *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading Modern perceptions of Classical Greece are almost invariably based on Athens and Sparta, but Corinth was also a key city-state in antiquity. When St. Paul visited in 51 CE, the Corinth he saw was actually a relatively new city, having been built a little over 100 years previously, but he found a city five times larger than Athens at that time and one which was the capital of a prosperous province. However, ancient Corinth had actually been founded in the 10th century BCE and was, for most of its history, the richest port and the largest city in all of Greece. Corinth had a population in excess of 90,000 in 400 BCE, but the Romans leveled this original city in 146 BCE, killing all the male inhabitants and selling the women and children into slavery. The few that survived fled to Delos, and for the next 100 years the site was deserted until Julius Caesar rebuilt it in 44 BCE. The story of the rise and fall of this powerful polis is intriguing, as are the reasons for ancient Corinth's reputation throughout the Greek world for its licentiousness. One of the Greek words for fornication was korinthiazomai, and while the city's association with sacred prostitutes scandalized contemporary Athenians in particular, it also made the city a favorite destination for many Greeks. Corinth was also where so much of what became recognized as "Greek art and architecture" was first developed, and it was here that Eastern influence on Greece can first and most obviously be detected. The destruction of ancient Corinth marked the end of free Greece, but despite the integral role it played in Hellas, Corinth has never been recognized as a great military or naval power in the way that Athens and Sparta have. It did not boast any exceptional schools of philosophy, nor are there any great buildings still remaining to attest to its successes. Corinth's contribution to the spread of Greek civilization, however, matches if not surpasses all of the more well-known poleis. Corinth also acted as a gateway for many of the artistic ideas from the East that local artisans adapted and developed to produce their own uniquely Corinthian style of pottery and art. In architecture, too, Corinth's contribution was significant, and the Corinthian style was utilized throughout Greece and the Greek world, especially in relation to temple building. The quintessential Greek ship, the trireme, was first developed in Corinth, and its role in defeating the Persians, a defeat that most historians agree changed world history, is still understated, probably because of the credence given to Herodotus' claims about the Corinthians' behavior in that war. The fact that the city was reestablished by Julius Caesar and, even today, is a highly important center of trade suggests that Corinth was destined to be a hub of trading activity and a prosperous city. Still, the advantages conferred by a favorable geographic position had to be seized, and this ancient Corinth did. Its impact on the ancient Greek world, and hence its influence on Western civilization, should not be underestimated, even as it mostly continues to be. Corinth: The History and Legacy of the Ancient Greek City-State examines the history of one of Greece's most important poleis. Along with pictures depicting important people, places, and events, you will learn about Corinth like never before.
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Empire of Ancient Greece

Author: Jean Kinney Williams

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN: 1438127839

Category: Greece

Page: 161

View: 2145

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The classical Greek civilization is the cornerstone of Western civilization today. The Greeks invented and developed everything from logic and democracy to rhetoric, drama, and philosophy. Empire of Ancient Greece, Revised Edition chronicles the remarkable legacy of the Greeks, as well as the diversity of their societies--from the thriving democracy of Athens to the militarism of Sparta to the oligarchy of Thrace. It explores the conditions that made it possible for the ancient Greeks to develop a culture that set the foundation for our intellectual lives today, and explains why Greek power eventually declined. Everyday life in ancient Greece, from the wealthy citizens who grappled in the Olympic arena to the farmers who found 50 different ways to use olive oil, is also examined. Connections in our own world to the ancient Greeks are numerous, including the Olympics, much of our classical literature, the scientific method, architecture, and many English words.
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The Athenian Navy and Spartan Army

The History and Legacy of Ancient Greece's Most Famous Military Forces

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors

Publisher: Independently Published

ISBN: 9781093946789

Category:

Page: 220

View: 1454

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*Includes pictures *Includes ancient accounts *Includes a bibliography for further reading "Forward, sons of the Greeks,Liberate the fatherland,Liberate your children, your women,The altars of the gods of your fathers,And the graves of your ancestors: Now is the fight for everything." - The Greek battle hymn sung before the Battle of Salamis according to Aeschylus Dominated to this day by the sprawling white marble complex of the Acropolis, Athens is a city which is immensely and rightly proud of its past. For a period of roughly three centuries, the polis of Athens stood, if not in a position of unchallenged supremacy among the cities of Hellas, then at the very least among its three most important polities. Its fledgling empire, though small by the standards later set by Alexander or the Romans, or even by those of its ancient enemy Persia, nonetheless encompassed cities as far afield as Asia Minor and Southern Italy, a remarkable fact considering such expansion was achieved by the inhabitants of a single city and its immediate surroundings, rather than by an entire nation. Yet despite a martial tradition that, if taken as a whole, was second to none save the Spartans, Athens is chiefly remembered for two reasons: its political system, which would in time form the nucleus of all Western democratic systems of government, and the remarkable number of outstanding individuals which, during the Golden Age of Athens, lived and flourished in the enlightened city-state. The Ancient Athenians formed the backbone of the West's entire culture, from the arts to philosophy and everything in between. In virtually all fields of human endeavor Athens was so much at the forefront of dynamism and innovation that the products of its most brilliant minds remain not only influential but entirely relevant to this day. The most unique city-state in Ancient Greece was Sparta, which continues to fascinate contemporaneous society. It is not entirely clear why Sparta placed such a great emphasis on having a militaristic society, but the result was that military fitness was a preoccupation from birth. If a Spartan baby did not appear physically fit at birth, it was left to die. Spartan children underwent military training around the age of 7 years old, and every male had to join the army around the age of 18. The Spartans, whose carefully constructed approach to warfare and - there is no other word for it - Spartan way of life, earned the grudging admiration of all of Greece and succeeded in establishing themselves in the years following the reforms of the semi-legendary ruler Lycurgus as the greatest military force in all of Hellas. Athens might have the mightiest fleet and the greatest cadre of philosophers and dramatists, Thessaly might have had the most vaunted cavalry, and the great city-states of Argos, Thebes and Corinth all had their own claims to fame, but on the battlefield the Spartan phalanx stood without peer. So feared were they in Greece that their very appearance on the battlefield could cause entire enemy armies to flee in terror, and in one of history's most famous battles, 300 Spartan warriors headed a combined Greek force which held off the hundreds of thousands of Persian warriors of Xerxes's invading army for three days at Thermopylae, inflicting an estimated 20,000 casualties upon them before dying to the last man rather than retreating. The Spartan Military: The History and Legacy of the Ancient World's Most Renowned Army looks at the history of the Spartan military, and how it became one of the most fearsome fighting forces in history. Along with pictures depicting important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Spartan military like never before.
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The Spartan Military

The History and Legacy of the Ancient World's Most Renowned Army

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781981856923

Category:

Page: 110

View: 4757

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*Includes pictures *Includes ancient accounts describing the Spartan military *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents "The only men in the world with whom war brought a respite from training for war." - Plutarch's description of Spartan warriors "The walls of Sparta were its young men, and its borders the points of their spears." - attributed to King Agesilaos There have been no shortage of great warrior societies in history, including the Romans, Mongols, Macedonians, and Vikings, the list goes on. Yet one humble city in particular, nestled in a valley near the Eurotas river in the Greek region of the Peloponnese and once ridiculed as little more than a cluster of villages inhabited by uncouth shepherds, produced the most famous warrior elite the world has ever known. The most unique city-state in Ancient Greece was Sparta, which continues to fascinate contemporaneous society. It is not entirely clear why Sparta placed such a great emphasis on having a militaristic society, but the result was that military fitness was a preoccupation from birth. If a Spartan baby did not appear physically fit at birth, it was left to die. Spartan children underwent military training around the age of 7 years old, and every male had to join the army around the age of 18. The Spartans, whose carefully constructed approach to warfare and - there is no other word for it - Spartan way of life, earned the grudging admiration of all of Greece and succeeded in establishing themselves in the years following the reforms of the semi-legendary ruler Lycurgus as the greatest military force in all of Hellas. Athens might have the mightiest fleet and the greatest cadre of philosophers and dramatists, Thessaly might have had the most vaunted cavalry, and the great city-states of Argos, Thebes and Corinth all had their own claims to fame, but on the battlefield the Spartan phalanx stood without peer. So feared were they in Greece that their very appearance on the battlefield could cause entire enemy armies to flee in terror, and in one of history's most famous battles, 300 Spartan warriors headed a combined Greek force which held off the hundreds of thousands of Persian warriors of Xerxes's invading army for three days at Thermopylae, inflicting an estimated 20,000 casualties upon them before dying to the last man rather than retreating. Sparta will forever be known for its military prowess, but they had lives off the battlefield as well, and their way of life was also unique. For example, Spartan females were formally educated, which was a rarity among the city-states, and the Spartan way of life was entirely dependent on a class of indentured servants known as the helots. Yet the Laws of Lycurgus, which ordered all Spartans to disregard art (with the exception of song, which the Spartans prized, and some forms of music and poetry), to distrust philosophy, and to abhor excess in all things, were designed to create the perfect warrior society, and they did. As a result, the Spartans became notorious for "Laconic phrases." The Spartan Military: The History and Legacy of the Ancient World's Most Renowned Army looks at the history of the Spartan military, and how it became one of the most fearsome fighting forces in history. Along with pictures depicting important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Spartan military like never before.
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World History, Volume I

Author: William J. Duiker,Jackson J. Spielvogel

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 049556902X

Category: History

Page: 624

View: 747

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Noted teachers and scholars William J. Duiker and Jackson J. Spielvogel present a balanced, highly readable overview of world history that explores common challenges and experiences that unite the human past and identify key global patterns over time. Tho
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The Greek World, 479-323 BC

Author: Simon Hornblower

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0415065577

Category: History

Page: 354

View: 6311

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Looks at areas of the Mediterranean world in which Greek culture flourished in the fifth and fourth centuries BC
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Ancient Greece

Author: William Harlan Hale

Publisher: Ibooks

ISBN: 9780743434690

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 1040

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Ancient Greece was the cradle of western civilization; like Rome, its influences on the world, in law, language, architecture, philosophy, and the art of government, remain with us to this day. In this richly illustrated volume, the reader can enjoy an all-around introduction to the politics, people, culture, and everyday life of the world of ancient Greece. Unlike most general histories, the reader will come to know this remarkable culture directly from the Greeks themselves, in their own words, through the works of orators, philosophers, historians, poets, playwrights, and satirists.
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Ancient Greece

The Legacy of Alexander the Great

Author: T. D. Van Basten

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781532835568

Category:

Page: 76

View: 9564

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The Greatest Military Leader in History Alexander III of Macedon, better known to the world as Alexander the Great, was one of the most powerful rulers of the ancient world. During his time, he amassed the largest amount of land that the Greek empire would ever see. He seemed to capture land with ease and managed to spread the culture and language of the Greek empire far and wide, ushering in what is referred to as the Hellenic Period. Born the son of King Philip II of Macedon and his main wife, Olympias, Alexander had a privileged upbringing. While much about his childhood has been lost to the proverbial sands of time, we know that he had a very close relationship with his mother and a rather tumultuous relationship with his father, as his father was gone a good deal of the time, conquering lands and their women. It was during the time of his father that the various Greek city-states came together under a single ruler. Dubbed the League of Corinth, it was comprised of all the regional city-states and Philip II was the sole leader of the League. He was, unfortunately, unexpectedly assassinated at his daughter's wedding, which threw the League and Macedonia into a bit of chaos...
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HSC Ancient History

Author: Peter Roberts

Publisher: Pascal Press

ISBN: 9781741251791

Category: Civilization, Ancient

Page: 386

View: 6455

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This comprehensive study guide covers everytopic in the last two sect ions of the HSC Ancient History course and has been specifically created to maximise exam success. This guide has been designed to meet all stud y needs, providing up-to-date information in an easy-to-use format. This is the second of the two new Ancient History study guides. E xcel Ancient History Book 2 contains: a chapter on eve ry topic available in the last two sections of the HSC course: Section I II - Personalities in their Times, and Section IV - Historical Periods an introductory section on how to use the book, with an explanat ion of exam requirements revision questions in each chapter wit h answers and guidelines comprehensive bibliography and further reading lists key terms defined in each chapter, plus a glossa ry of terms cross-referencing between chapters for further info rmation Also available is Excel Ancient History B ook 1 which covers comprehensive coverage of Sections I and II of the HS C course: Section I - Personalities in the Times and Section II - Ancien t Societies.
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