Contemporary Irish Plays

Contemporary Irish Plays

Forgotten features the interconnecting stories of four elderly people living in retirement homes and care facilities around Ireland, who range in age from 80 to 100 years old.

Author: Michael West

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781472576699

Category: Drama

Page: 400

View: 611

Contemporary Irish Plays showcases the new drama that has emerged since 2008. Featuring a blend of established and emerging writers, the anthology shows how Irish writers are embracing new methods of theatre-making to explore exciting new themes – while also finding new ways to come to terms with the legacies of the Troubles and the Celtic Tiger. Freefall is a sharp, humorous and exhilarating look at the fragility of a human life, blending impressionistic beauty, poignancy and comedy. Forgotten features the interconnecting stories of four elderly people living in retirement homes and care facilities around Ireland, who range in age from 80 to 100 years old. Drum Belly is a fascinating play about the Irish mafia in late 1960s' New York. It premiered at the Abbey Theatre in 2012. Previously unpublished, Planet Belfast by Rosemary Jenkinson is about a woman named Alice – Stormont's only Green MLA who must toe a delicate line between large, sectarian power bases in order to promote an environmental agenda in Northern Ireland. Desolate Heaven is a story about two young girls hoping to find freedom from home in the trappings of love. It was first performed at Theatre 503, London, in 2013 Written for the 2012 Dublin Theatre Festival, and previously unpublished, The Boys of Foley Street by Louise Lowe is a piece of site-specific theatre which led audience members on a tour of the backstreets of inner-city Dublin. Edited by the leading scholar on Irish theatre, Patrick Lonergan, Contemporary Irish Plays is a timely reminder of the long-held tradition and strength of Irish theatre which blossoms even in its new-found circumstances.
Categories: Drama

The Palgrave Handbook of Contemporary Irish Theatre and Performance

The Palgrave Handbook of Contemporary Irish Theatre and Performance

Philip Roberts, The Royal Court Theatre and the Modern Stage (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999), 45, 76, 178,228. 8. For more on this see Peter Harris's From Stage to Page: Critical Reception of Irish Plays in the London ...

Author: Eamonn Jordan

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137585882

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 866

View: 943

This Handbook offers a multiform sweep of theoretical, historical, practical and personal glimpses into a landscape roughly characterised as contemporary Irish theatre and performance. Bringing together a spectrum of voices and sensibilities in each of its four sections — Histories, Close-ups, Interfaces, and Reflections — it casts its gaze back across the past sixty years or so to recall, analyse, and assess the recent legacy of theatre and performance on this island. While offering information, overviews and reflections of current thought across its chapters, this book will serve most handily as food for thought and a springboard for curiosity. Offering something different in its mix of themes and perspectives, so that previously unexamined surfaces might come to light individually and in conjunction with other essays, it is a wide-ranging and indispensable resource in Irish theatre studies.
Categories: Performing Arts

Masculinities and Manhood in Contemporary Irish Drama

Masculinities and Manhood in Contemporary Irish Drama

Middleton, Peter. 1992. The Inward Gaze: Masculinity and Subjectivity in Modern Culture. London: Routledge. Morash, Christopher. 2002. A History of Irish Theatre: 1601–2000. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Murphy, Jimmy. 2001.

Author: Cormac O’Brien

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030840754

Category:

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The Methuen Drama Guide to Contemporary Irish Playwrights

The Methuen Drama Guide to Contemporary Irish Playwrights

Theatre Stuff: Critical Essays on Contemporary Irish Theatre (Dublin: Carysfort Press, 2000), pp. xi–xliii. Kiberd, Declan, Inventing Ireland: The Literature ofthe Modern Nation (London: Vintage, 1996). Llewellyn-Jones, Margaret ...

Author: Martin Middeke

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781408198629

Category: Drama

Page: 480

View: 161

The Methuen Drama Guide to Contemporary Irish Playwrights is an authoritative guide to the work of twenty-five playwrights from the last 50 years whose work has helped to shape and define Irish theatre. Written by a team of international scholars, it provides an illuminating survey and analysis of each writer's plays and will be invaluable to anyone interested in, studying or teaching contemporary Irish drama. The playwrights examined range from John B. Keane, Brian Friel and Tom Murphy, to the crop of writers who emerged in the 1990s and who include Martin McDonagh, Marina Carr, Emma Donoghue and Mark O'Rowe. Each essay features: a biographical sketch and introduction to the playwright a discussion of their most important plays an analysis of their stylistic and thematic traits, the critical reception and their place in the discourses of Irish theatre a bibliography of texts and critical material With a total of 190 plays discussed in detail, over half of which were written during the 1990s and 2000s, The Methuen Drama Guide to Contemporary Irish Playwrights is unrivalled in its study of recent plays and playwrights.
Categories: Drama

Oscar Wilde and Contemporary Irish Drama

Oscar Wilde and Contemporary Irish Drama

Learning to be Oscar's Contemporary Graham Price. 10. 11. 12. 13. ... Fintan O'Toole, 'Introduction', Plays 1 (London and New York: Methuen Press, 1999), p. ix. 2. ... It's Money: The Oberon Anthology of Contemporary Irish Plays, ed.

Author: Graham Price

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319933450

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 249

View: 602

This book is about the Wildean aesthetic in contemporary Irish drama. Through elucidating a discernible Wildean strand in the plays of Brian Friel, Tom Murphy, Thomas Kilroy, Marina Carr and Frank McGuinness, it demonstrates that Oscar Wilde's importance to Ireland's theatrical canon is equal to that of W. B. Yeats, J. M. Synge and Samuel Beckett. The study examines key areas of the Wildean aesthetic: his aestheticizing of experience via language and self-conscious performance; the notion of the dandy in Wildean texts and how such a figure is engaged with in today's dramas; and how his contribution to the concept of a ‘verbal theatre’ has influenced his dramatic successors. It is of particular pertinence to academics and postgraduate students in the fields of Irish drama and Irish literature, and for those interested in the work of Oscar Wilde, Brian Friel, Tom Murphy, Thomas Kilroy, Marina Carr and Frank McGuinness. okokpoj
Categories: Performing Arts

The Tiger in Winter Six Contemporary Irish Plays

The Tiger in Winter  Six Contemporary Irish Plays

Containing six award-winning plays by contemporary Irish writers, this is an exciting collection of the best writing to come out of Ireland in the last six years.

Author: Mark Doherty

Publisher: Methuen Drama

ISBN: UCSC:32106019101499

Category: Drama

Page: 354

View: 793

Focusing on the Irish male, these stories suggest that the burden of poverty may have lifted, but festering on is the emotional repression inherited from an authoritarian church and state. The hurt within individual lives is clearly explored, but the pathways to emotional liberation can be traced in the subtexts.
Categories: Drama

Modern Irish Theatre

Modern Irish Theatre

Earlier in 2007, the Druid Theatre Company produced its own Playboy of the Western World as part of the Tokyo ... Likewise, Druid has given voice to contemporary images of Irish life through the work of playwrights like Frank McGuinness ...

Author: Mary Trotter

Publisher: Polity

ISBN: 9780745633435

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 233

View: 975

Through analysis of both major Irish dramas and the artists and companies that performed them, Modern Irish Theatre provides an engaging and accessible introduction to 20th century Irish theatre: its origins, dominant themes, relationship to politics and culture, and influence on theatre movements around the world. By looking at her subject as a performance rather than a literary phenomenon, Trotter captures how Irish theatre has actively reflected and shaped debates about Irish culture and identity among audiences, artists, and critics for over a century. This text provides the reader with discussion and analysis of: * Significant playwrights and companies, from Lady Gregory to Brendan Behan to Marina Carr, and from the Abbey Theatre to the Lyric Theatre to Field Day; * Major historical events, including the war for Independence, the Troubles, and the social effects of the Celtic Tiger economy; * Critical Methodologies: how postcolonial, diaspora, performance, gender, and cultural theories, among others, shed light on Irish theatre's political and artistic significance, and how it has addressed specific national concerns. Because of its comprehensiveness and originality, Modern Irish Theatre will be of great interest to students and general readers interested in theatre studies, cultural studies, Irish studies, and political performance.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Performing Character in Modern Irish Drama

Performing Character in Modern Irish Drama

Modern Drama 40 (3): 359–373. Kurdi, Maria. 2000. Historical Fragmentation Impacting National Identity: A Postcolonial Reading of Thomas Murphy's Famine. In Codes and Masks. Aspects of Identity in Contemporary Irish Plays in an ...

Author: Michał Lachman

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319765358

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 312

View: 538

This book is about the history of character in modern Irish drama. It traces the changing fortunes of the human self in a variety of major Irish plays across the twentieth century and the beginning of the new millennium. Through the analysis of dramatic protagonists created by such authors as Yeats, Synge, O’Casey, Friel and Murphy, and McGuinness and Walsh, it tracks the development of aesthetic and literary styles from modernism to more recent phenomena, from Celtic Revival to Celtic Tiger, and after. The human character is seen as a testing ground and battlefield for new ideas, for social philosophies, and for literary conventions through which each historical epoch has attempted to express its specific cultural and literary identity. In this context, Irish drama appears to be both part of the European literary tradition, engaging with its most contentious issues, and a field of resistance to some conventions from continental centres of avant-garde experimentation. Simultaneously, it follows artistic fashions and redefines them in its critical contribution to European artistic and theatrical diversity.
Categories: Performing Arts

Masculinities and the Contemporary Irish Theatre

Masculinities and the Contemporary Irish Theatre

Fintan O'Toole, Review of Northern Star, Sunday Tribune, 2 December 1984, reprinted in Julia Furay and Redmond O'Hanlon (eds), Critical Moments: Fintan O'Toole on Modern Irish Theatre (Dublin: Carysfort Press, 2003), p. 32.

Author: B. Singleton

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230294530

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 227

View: 437

Irish theatre and its histories appear to be dominated by men and their actions. This book's socially and culturally contextualized analysis of performance over the last two decades, however reveals masculinities that are anything but hegemonic, played out in theatres and other arenas of performance all over Ireland.
Categories: Performing Arts

The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish Theatre

The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish Theatre

Of contemporary Irish American playwrights, the most prominent is John Patrick Shanley, whose play Doubt (2004) was produced at the Abbey in 2006 before it was adapted by the playwright for a major motion picture.

Author: Nicholas Grene

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191016349

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 688

View: 880

The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish Theatre provides the single most comprehensive survey of the field to be found in a single volume. Drawing on more than forty contributors from around the world, the book addresses a full range of topics relating to modern Irish theatre from the late nineteenth-century theatre to the most recent works of postdramatic devised theatre. Ireland has long had an importance in the world of theatre out of all proportion to the size of the country, and has been home to four Nobel Laureates (Yeats, Shaw, and Beckett; Seamus Heaney, while primarily a poet, also wrote for the stage). This collection begins with the influence of melodrama, looks at arguably the first modern Irish playwright, Oscar Wilde, before moving into a series of considerations of the Abbey Theatre, and Irish modernism. Arranged chronologically, it explores areas such as women in theatre, Irish-language theatre, and alternative theatres, before reaching the major writers of more recent Irish theatre, including Brian Friel and Tom Murphy, and their successors. There are also individual chapters focusing on Beckett and Shaw, as well as a series of chapters looking at design, acting and theatre architecture. The book concludes with an extended survey of the critical literature on the field. In each chapter, the author does not simply rehearse accepted wisdom; all of the authors push the boundaries of their respective fields, so that each chapter is a significant contribution to scholarship in its own right.
Categories: Literary Criticism