Contagion and the Shakespearean Stage

Contagion and the Shakespearean Stage

This collection of essays considers what constituted contagion in the minds of early moderns in the absence of modern germ theory.

Author: Darryl Chalk

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783030144289

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 292

View: 144

This collection of essays considers what constituted contagion in the minds of early moderns in the absence of modern germ theory. In a wide range of essays focused on early modern drama and the culture of theater, contributors explore how ideas of contagion not only inform representations of the senses (such as smell and touch) and emotions (such as disgust, pity, and shame) but also shape how people understood belief, narrative, and political agency. Epidemic thinking was not limited to medical inquiry or the narrow study of a particular disease. Shakespeare, Thomas Middleton, Ben Jonson, Thomas Dekker and other early modern writers understood that someone might be infected or transformed by the presence of others, through various kinds of exchange, or if exposed to certain ideas, practices, or environmental conditions. The discourse and concept of contagion provides a lens for understanding early modern theatrical performance, dramatic plots, and theater-going itself.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Humoral Wombs on the Shakespearean Stage

Humoral Wombs on the Shakespearean Stage

See “'A deal of stinking breath': The smell of contagion in the early modern playhouse” in Contagion and the Shakespearean Stage, ed.

Author: Amy Kenny

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783030052010

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 202

View: 104

This book explores how the humoral womb was evoked, enacted, and embodied on the Shakespearean stage by considering the intersection of performance studies and humoral theory. Galenic naturalism applied the four humors—yellow bile, black bile, phlegm, and blood—to delineate women as porous, polluting, and susceptible to their environment. This book draws on early modern medical texts to provocatively demonstrate how Shakespeare’s canon offers a unique agency to female characters via humoral discourse of the womb. Chapters discuss early modern medicine’s attempt to theorize and interpret the womb, specifically its role in disease, excretion, and conception, alongside passages of Shakespeare’s plays to offer a fresh reading of (geo)humoral subjectivity. The book shows how Shakespeare subversively challenges contemporary notions of female fluidity by accentuating the significance of the womb as a source of self-defiance and autonomy for female characters across his canon.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Occult Knowledge Science and Gender on the Shakespearean Stage

Occult Knowledge  Science  and Gender on the Shakespearean Stage

On contagious sympathy, see Eric Langley, “Plagued by kindness': Contagious Sympathy in Shakespearean Drama,” Medical Humanities 37 (2011): 103-09. 2.

Author: Mary Floyd-Wilson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107036321

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 236

View: 631

Belief in spirits, demons and the occult was commonplace in the early modern period, as was the view that these forces could be used to manipulate nature and produce new knowledge. In this groundbreaking study, Mary Floyd-Wilson explores these beliefs in relation to women and scientific knowledge, arguing that the early modern English understood their emotions and behavior to be influenced by hidden sympathies and antipathies in the natural world. Focusing on Twelfth Night, Arden of Faversham, A Warning for Fair Women, All's Well That Ends Well, The Changeling and The Duchess of Malfi, she demonstrates how these plays stage questions about whether women have privileged access to nature's secrets and whether their bodies possess hidden occult qualities. Discussing the relationship between scientific discourse and the occult, she goes on to argue that as experiential evidence gained scientific ground, women's presumed intimacy with nature's secrets was either diminished or demonized.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Theatres of Contagion

Theatres of Contagion

Among the works analysed include a musical adaptation and an intercultural variation of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet; a contemporary queer take on Hamlet; Grand Guignol and theatres of horror; the writings and influence of Artaud; ...

Author: Fintan Walsh

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350085992

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 232

View: 359

To what extent is theatre a contagious practice, capable of undoing and enlivening people and cultures? Theatres of Contagion responds to some of the anxieties of our current political and cultural climate by exploring theatre's status as a contagious cultural force, questioning its role in the spread or control of medical, psychological and emotional conditions and phenomena. Observing a diverse range of practices from the early modern to contemporary period, the volume considers how this contagion is understood to happen and operate, its real and imagined effects, and how these have been a source of pleasure and fear for theatre makers, audiences and authorities. Drawing on perspectives from medicine, neuroscience, psychology, anthropology, philosophy, law and affect theory, essays investigate some of the ways in which theatre can be viewed as a powerful agent of containment and transmission. Among the works analysed include a musical adaptation and an intercultural variation of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet; a contemporary queer take on Hamlet; Grand Guignol and theatres of horror; the writings and influence of Artaud; immersive theatre and the work of Punchdrunk, and computer gaming and smartphone apps
Categories: Performing Arts

Shakespeare s Contagious Sympathies

Shakespeare s Contagious Sympathies

Theorizing Gossip on Shakespeare's Stage, Who Hears in Shakespeare: Auditory Worlds on Stage and Screen, ed. Laury Magnus and Walter W. Cannon (Madison: ...

Author: Eric Langley

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192554925

Category: Drama

Page: 336

View: 397

Understanding the early-modern subject to be constituted, as Shakespeare's Ulysses explains, by its communications with others, this study considers what happens when these conceptions of compassionate communication and sympathetic exchange are comprehensively undermined by period anxieties concerning contagion and the transmission of disease. Allowing that 'no man is . . . any thing' until he has 'communicate[d] his parts to others', can these formative communications still be risked in a world preoccupied by communicable sickness, where every contact risks contraction, where every touch could be the touch of plague, where kind interaction could facilitate cruel infection, and where to commiserate is to risk 'miserable dependence'? Counting the cost of compassion, this study of Shakespeare's plays and poetry analyses how medical explanations of disease impact upon philosophical conceptions and literary depictions of his characters who find themselves precariously implicated within a world of ill communications. It examines the influence of scientific thought upon the history of the subject, and explores how Shakespeare—alive to both the importance and dangers of sympathetic communication—articulates an increasing sense of both the pragmatic benefits of monadic thought, emotional isolation, and subjective quarantine, while offering his account of the considerable loss involved when we lose faith in vulnerable, tender, and open existence.
Categories: Drama

Shakespeare Sense

Shakespeare   Sense

His most recent book is Contagion and the Shakespearean Stage (2019), a volume of essays co-edited with Mary Floyd-Wilson. A monograph, with the working ...

Author: Simon Smith

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781474273244

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 400

View: 539

Shakespeare | Sense explores the intersection of Shakespeare and sensory studies, asking what sensation can tell us about early modern drama and poetry, and, conversely, how Shakespeare explores the senses in his literary craft, his fictional worlds, and his stagecraft. 15 substantial new essays by leading Shakespeareans working in sensory studies and related disciplines interrogate every aspect of Shakespeare and sense, from the place of hearing, smell, sight, touch, and taste in early modern life, literature, and performance culture, through to the significance of sensation in 21st century engagements with Shakespeare on stage, screen and page. The volume explores and develops current methods for studying Shakespeare and sensation, reflecting upon the opportunities and challenges created by this emergent and influential area of scholarly enquiry. Many chapters develop fresh readings of particular plays and poems, from Hamlet, A Midsummer Night's Dream, King Lear, and The Tempest to less-studied works such as The Comedy of Errors, Venus and Adonis, Troilus and Cressida, and Cymbeline.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Shakespeare s Audiences

Shakespeare   s Audiences

... Air: Deleuze's Encounter with Shakespeare,” Early Modern Culture 13, no. ... the Early Modern Playhouse,” in Contagion and the Shakespearean Stage, eds.

Author: Matteo Pangallo

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000352573

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 234

View: 573

Shakespeare wrote for a theater in which the audience was understood to be, and at times invited to be, active and participatory. How have Shakespeare’s audiences, from the sixteenth century to the present, responded to that invitation? In what ways have consumers across different cultural contexts, periods, and platforms engaged with the performance of Shakespeare’s plays? What are some of the different approaches taken by scholars today in thinking about the role of Shakespeare's audiences and their relationship to performance? The chapters in this collection use a variety of methods and approaches to explore the global history of audience experience of Shakespearean performance in theater, film, radio, and digital media. The approaches that these contributors take look at Shakespeare’s audiences through a variety of lenses, including theater history, dramaturgy, film studies, fan studies, popular culture, and performance. Together, they provide both close studies of particular moments in the history of Shakespeare’s audiences and a broader understanding of the various, often complex, connections between and among those audiences across the long history of Shakespearean performance.
Categories: Literary Collections

A Midsummer Night s Dream Language and Writing

A Midsummer Night   s Dream  Language and Writing

Barber, C. L. Shakespeare's Festive Comedy: A Study of Dramatic Form. ... Shakespeare Without Women: Representing Gender and Race on the Renaissance Stage.

Author: R.S. White

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350103894

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 232

View: 500

This lively and informative guide to Shakespeare's popular comedy equips you with the critical skills to analyse its language, structure and themes and to expand and enrich your own response to the play. A Midsummer Night's Dream is a perfect play for exploring Shakespeare's diverse uses of language to reveal character and themes, from formal iambics and rhyming couplets of courtiers and lovers, and 'warbling' notes' and nursery rhythms of fairies, to stocky prose by the artisan players including Bottom's comic malapropisms. An introduction considers when and how the play was written, and addresses the language with which Shakespeare created A Midsummer Night's Dream, as well as the generic, literary and theatrical conventions at his disposal. It then moves to a detailed examination and analysis of the play, focusing on its literary, technical and historical intricacies; an account of the play's performance history and its critical reception completes the volume. Each chapter offers a 'Writing matters' section, clearly linking the analysis of Shakespeare's language to your own writing strategies in coursework and examinations.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Audience and Reception in the Early Modern Period

Audience and Reception in the Early Modern Period

Contagious Emulation: Antitheatricality and Theater as Plague in Troilus ... “Affective Technologies: Toward an Emotional Logic of the Elizabethan Stage”.

Author: John R. Decker

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000435498

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 145

Early modern audiences, readerships, and viewerships were not homogenous. Differences in status, education, language, wealth, and experience (to name only a few variables) could influence how a group of people, or a particular person, received and made sense of sermons, public proclamations, dramatic and musical performances, images, objects, and spaces. The ways in which each of these were framed and executed could have a serious impact on their relevance and effectiveness. The chapters in this volume explore the ways in which authors, poets, artists, preachers, theologians, playwrights, and performers took account of and encoded pluriform potential audiences, readers, and viewers in their works, and how these varied parties encountered and responded to these works. The contributors here investigate these complex interactions through a variety of critical and methodological lenses.
Categories: History

Geographies of Embodiment in Early Modern England

Geographies of Embodiment in Early Modern England

... 2004) with Gail Kern Paster and Katherine Rowe and Contagion and the Shakespearean Stage (Palgrave, 2019) with Darryl Chalk, and she is currently ...

Author: Mary Floyd-Wilson

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198852742

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 580

Geographies of Embodiment in Early Modern England gathers essays from prominent scholars of English Renaissance literature and history who have made substantial contributions to the study of early modern embodiment, historical phenomenology, affect, cognition, memory, and natural philosophy. It provides new interpretations of the geographic dimensions of early modern embodiment, emphasizing the transactional and dynamic aspects of the relationship between body and world. The geographies of embodiment encompass both cognitive processes and cosmic environments, and inner emotional states as well as affective landscapes. Rather than always being territorialized onto individual bodies, ideas about early modern embodiment are varied both in their scope and in terms of their representation. Reflecting this variety, this volume offers up a range of inquiries into how early modern writers accounted for the exchanges between the microcosm and macrocosm. It engages with Gail Kern Paster's groundbreaking scholarship on embodiment, humoralism, the passions, and historical phenomenology throughout, and offers new readings of Edmund Spenser, William Shakespeare, Thomas Nashe, John Milton, and others. Contributions consider the epistemiologies of navigation and cartography, the significance of geohumoralism, the ethics of self-mastery, theories of early modern cosmology, the construction of place memory, and perceptions of an animate spirit world.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Surgery and Selfhood in Early Modern England

Surgery and Selfhood in Early Modern England

'Contagious Pity: Cultural Difference and the Language of Contagion in Titus Andronicus'. In Contagion and the Shakespearean Stage, edited by Darryl Chalk ...

Author: Alanna Skuse

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108911504

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 127

Offering an innovative perspective on early modern debates concerning embodiment, Alanna Skuse examines diverse kinds of surgical alteration, from mastectomy to castration, and amputation to facial reconstruction. Body-altering surgeries had profound socio-economic and philosophical consequences. They reached beyond the physical self, and prompted early modern authors to develop searching questions about the nature of body integrity and its relationship to the soul: was the body a part of one's identity, or a mere 'prison' for the mind? How was the body connected to personal morality? What happened to the altered body after death? Drawing on a wide variety of texts including medical treatises, plays, poems, newspaper reports and travel writings, this volume will argue the answers to these questions were flexible, divergent and often surprising, and helped to shape early modern thoughts on philosophy, literature, and the natural sciences. This title is also available as Open Access on Cambridge Core.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Meteorology and Physiology in Early Modern Culture

Meteorology and Physiology in Early Modern Culture

7. of Shakespeare's Early Plays,” Shakespeare Quarterly 39.2 (Summer, ... and Darryl Chalk's edited volume, Contagion and the Shakespearean Stage, ...

Author: Rebecca Totaro

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351607629

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 172

View: 746

Meteorology and Physiology in Early Modern Culture: Earthquakes, Human Identity, and Textual Representation provides the first sustained examination of the foundational set of early modern beliefs linking meteorology and physiology. This was a relationship so intimate and, to us, poetic that we have spent centuries assuming early moderns were using figurative language when they represented the matter and motions of their bodies in meteorological terms and weather events in physiological ones. Early moderns believed they inhabited a geocentric universe in which the matter and motions constituting all sublunary things were the same and that therefore all things were compositionally and interactively related. What physically generated anger, erotic desire, and plague also generated thunder, the earthquake, and the comet. As a result, the interpretation of meteorological events, such as the 1580 earthquake in the Dover Strait, was consequential. With its radical and seemingly spontaneous shaking, an earthquake could expose inconvenient truths about the cause of matter and motion and about what, if anything, distinguishes humans from every other thing and from events. Meteorology and Physiology in Early Modern Culture reveals a need for reexamination of all representations of meteorology and physiology in the period. This reexamination begins here with a focus on the Titanic metamorphoses captured by Edmund Spenser, William Shakespeare, John Donne, and the many writers responding to the 1580 earthquake.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Pandemonium

Pandemonium

In an e-newsletter from UNC Chapel Hill, there was an item about a recent book called “Contagion and the Shakespearean Stage”, co-edited by Mary ...

Author: Mike Lauterborn

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN: 9781728366395

Category: History

Page: 402

View: 553

There was no imagining what the state of the world would become when the news of the first cluster of infections was announced in late 2019. Those seeds would grow into a massively devastating global pandemic caused by Covid-19. It would have implications at every single level in society. And from his beachside home in Fairfield, CT just 40 miles northeast of New York City — the epicenter of the disaster — and as the editor of a local online news service, Mike Lauterborn was in a position to capture it all. The international and national impacts. The effect on people and commerce at the local level. The shift in lifestyle, attitudes, mental condition and future outlook that the pandemic caused. The humor, the tragedy, the cheer, the grief, the patriotism, the division, the conspiracy theories, the outpouring of love, the show of rage, the remarkable efforts of first responders, the toll on front line workers. It’s all here, as a lasting record for those of us who lived through it to recollect, but also as a roadmap for future generations facing similar crises. Here’s what we did. Here’s what worked and didn’t work. Here’s what you might try and here’s what you should avoid. But in the end, it’s tough love and community hugs and family bonds that win the day. #worldstrong #humanstrong #communitystrong #familystrong
Categories: History

The Hand on the Shakespearean Stage

The Hand on the Shakespearean Stage

... is evident in the range of disease pamphlets, some of which deployed the idiom of touch: contagion, for example, implies the very sense is at its root.

Author: Farah Karim Cooper

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781474234283

Category: Drama

Page: 328

View: 974

This ground-breaking new book uncovers the way Shakespeare draws upon the available literature and visual representations of the hand to inform his drama. Providing an analysis of gesture, touch, skill and dismemberment in a range of Shakespeare's works, it shows how the hand was perceived in Shakespeare's time as an indicator of human agency, emotion, social and personal identity. It demonstrates how the hand and its activities are described and embedded in Shakespeare's texts and about its role on the Shakespearean stage: as part of the actor's body, in the language as metaphor, and as a morbid stage-prop. Understanding the cultural signifiers that lie behind the early modern understanding of the hand and gesture, opens up new and sometimes disturbing ways of reading and seeing Shakespeare's plays.
Categories: Drama

Emotional Excess on the Shakespearean Stage

Emotional Excess on the Shakespearean Stage

... describing the stage as a mirror, which offers '“virtue her own feature” or “scorn her own image” [Hamlet] does not encourage the contagious effects of ...

Author: Bridget Escolme

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9781408179680

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 344

View: 788

This book is open access and available on www.bloomsburycollections.com. It is funded by Knowledge Unlatched. Emotional Excess on the Shakespearean Stage demonstrates the links made between excess of emotion and madness in the early modern period. It argues that the ways in which today's popular and theatrical cultures judge how much is too much can distort our understanding of early modern drama and theatre. It argues that permitting the excesses of the early modern drama onto the contemporary stage might free actors and audiences alike from assumptions that in order to engage with the drama of the past, its characters must be just like us. The book deals with characters in the plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries who are sad for too long, or angry to the point of irrationality; people who laugh when they shouldn't or make their audiences do so; people whose selfhood has broken down into an excess of fragmentary extremes and who are labelled mad. It is about moments in the theatre when excessive emotion is rewarded and applauded - and about moments when the expression of emotion is in excess of what is socially acceptable: embarrassing, shameful, unsettling or insane. The book explores the broader cultures of emotion that produce these theatrical moments, and the theatre's role in regulating and extending the acceptable expression of emotion. It is concerned with the acting of excessive emotion and with acting emotion excessively. And it asks how these excesses are produced or erased, give pleasure or pain, in versions of early modern drama in theatre, film and television today. Plays discussed include Hamlet, Romeo and Juliet, The Spanish Tragedy, Twelfth Night, Much Ado About Nothing, Measure for Measure, and Coriolanus.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Greek Tragic Women on Shakespearean Stages

Greek Tragic Women on Shakespearean Stages

... or, The Diva Vanishes,” Shakespeare Yearbook 10 (1999):402–26; ... “To Creep In At Mine Eyes”: Theatre And Secret Contagion In Twelfth Night,” in Rapt ...

Author: Tanya Pollard

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192511607

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 320

View: 583

Greek Tragic Women on Shakespearean Stages argues that ancient Greek plays exerted a powerful and uncharted influence on early modern England's dramatic landscape. Drawing on original research to challenge longstanding assumptions about Greek texts' invisibility, the book shows not only that the plays were more prominent than we have believed, but that early modern readers and audiences responded powerfully to specific plays and themes. The Greek plays most popular in the period were not male-centered dramas such as Sophocles' Oedipus, but tragedies by Euripides that focused on raging bereaved mothers and sacrificial virgin daughters, especially Hecuba and Iphigenia. Because tragedy was firmly linked with its Greek origin in the period's writings, these iconic female figures acquired a privileged status as synecdoches for the tragic theater and its ability to conjure sympathetic emotions in audiences. When Hamlet reflects on the moving power of tragic performance, he turns to the most prominent of these figures: 'What's Hecuba to him, or he to Hecuba/ That he should weep for her?' Through readings of plays by Shakespeare and his contemporary dramatists, this book argues that newly visible Greek plays, identified with the origins of theatrical performance and represented by passionate female figures, challenged early modern writers to reimagine the affective possibilities of tragedy, comedy, and the emerging genre of tragicomedy.
Categories: Literary Collections

Lighting the Shakespearean Stage 1567 1642

Lighting the Shakespearean Stage  1567   1642

... spectacles at the Theatre and Curtaine and other like places . . . wch be otherwise p[er]ilous for contagion biside the withdrawing from Gods srvice.

Author: Robert B. Graves

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 0809386690

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 288

View: 758

In Lighting the Shakespearean Stage, 1567–1642,R. B. Graves examines the lighting of early modern English drama from both historical and aesthetic perspectives. He traces the contrasting traditions of sunlit amphitheaters and candlelit hall playhouses, describes the different lighting techniques, and estimates the effect of these techniques both indoors and outdoors. Graves discusses the importance of stage lighting in determining the dramatic effect, even in cases where the manipulation of light was not under the direct control of the theater artists. He devotes a chapter to the early modern lighting equipment available to English Renaissance actors and surveys theatrical lighting before the construction of permanent playhouses in London. Elizabethan stage lighting, he argues, drew on both classical and medieval precedents.
Categories: Performing Arts

The Bible on the Shakespearean Stage

The Bible on the Shakespearean Stage

... for the sufferings of others “is a verie daungerous contagion”: “Thinkest thou that anie vertue consisteth in softenesse and abjection of the minde?

Author: Thomas Fulton

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108624428

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 177

The Bible was everywhere in Shakespeare's England. Through sermons, catechisms, treatises, artwork, literature and, of course, biblical reading itself, the stories and language of the Bible pervaded popular and elite culture. In recent years, scholars have demonstrated how thoroughly biblical allusions saturate Shakespearean plays. But Shakespeare's audiences were not simply well versed in the Bible's content - they were also steeped in the practices and methods of biblical interpretation. Reformation and counter-reformation debate focused not just on the biblical text, but - crucially - on how to read the text. The Bible on the Shakespearean Stage is the first volume to integrate the study of Shakespeare's plays with the vital history of Reformation practices of biblical interpretation. Bringing together the foremost international scholars in the field of 'Shakespeare and the Bible', these essays explore Shakespeare's engagement with scriptural interpretation in the tragedies, histories, comedies, and romances.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Time and Gender on the Shakespearean Stage

Time and Gender on the Shakespearean Stage

... 'in the morn and liquid dew of youth | Contagious blastments are most ... and that through the use of this image Shakespeare was actually drawing on ...

Author: Sarah Lewis

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108842198

Category: Drama

Page: 280

View: 738

An original study of the ways in which temporal concepts and gendered identities intersect in early modern theatre and culture.
Categories: Drama