Communities and Workforce Development

Communities and Workforce Development

Workforce. Development. Initiatives. Beverly Takahashi DePauw University
Edwin Meléndez New School University In ... literature than initiatives sponsored
by government, industry, community- based organizations, or community
colleges.

Author: Edwin Meléndez

Publisher: W.E. Upjohn Institute

ISBN: 9780880993173

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 499

View: 788

Farberville, Arkansas is playing host to its first ever mystery convention. Sponsored by the Thurber Farber Foundation and held at Farber College, Murder Comes to Campus is playing host to five major mystery writers representing all areas of the field. Dragooned into running the show when the original organizer is hospitalized, local bookseller Claire Malloy finds herself in the midst of a barely controlled disaster. Not only do each of the writers present their own set of idiosyncrasies and difficulties (including one who arrives with her cat Wimple in tow), the feared, distrusted, and disliked mystery editor of Paradigm House, Roxanne Small, puts in a surprise appearance at the conference. Added to Claire's own love-life woes with local police detective Peter Rosen, things have never been worse.Then when one of the attendees dies in a suspicious car accident, Wimple the cat disappears from Claire's home, and Roxanne Small is nowhere to be found, it becomes evident that the murder mystery is more than a literary genre.
Categories: Business & Economics

Community College Leaders on Workforce Development

Community College Leaders on Workforce Development

Dr. Ferguson has also held positions at Ashland Community and Technical
College in Ashland, Kentucky, where he served as an instructor, Dean of
Community Workforce and Economic Development, and Dean of Resource
Development ...

Author: William J. Rothwell

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781475827439

Category: Education

Page: 176

View: 705

This book has two things going for it that are rarely combined—it is fundamentally purposeful and it is useful. As the authors point out, there is a trilogy of needs confronting any business leader with a change agenda and/or transitioning into a new top role: influence, coalition building, and performance consulting. Of the three, performance consulting has received the least amount of attention in both the public and private-sector businesses. Because the focus on performance consulting rests primarily on the worker and the workplace environment, the authors contend that we must have a picture of how that environment has changed over the years. In this book, visionary leaders of community colleges will present their views about the present challenges and future approaches needed for community colleges to be successful.
Categories: Education

Linking Workforce Development to Economic Development

Linking Workforce Development to Economic Development

Community. colleges are widely acknowledged to be the frontline of workforce
development. Perhapswhatis best known about their mission isthat theypro- vide
trainingacrossabroad spectrumofprograms, using many media, to serve many ...

Author: William J. Rothwell

Publisher: Amer. Assn. of Community Col

ISBN: 9780871173836

Category: Education

Page: 211

View: 275

"Provides 28 case studies demonstrating how community colleges identify and address the continuous learning needs of their communities and how they develop individuals, help employers, and support communities as they fill the workforce training needs of the country"--Provided by publisher.
Categories: Education

Workforce Development

Workforce Development

Given the importance of community colleges to workforce development, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) was asked to examine (1) how community colleges meet the workforce training needs of their communities; (2) what community ...

Author: George A. Scott

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1064163450

Category:

Page: 46

View: 225

In the future, businesses will demand workers with higher-level skills and more education. Community colleges are key providers of career and technical training as well as traditional academic education. These colleges can also play important roles in the one-stop system created by the Workforce Investment Act (WIA), through which a variety of federally funded employment and training programs provide services. Given the importance of community colleges to workforce development, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) was asked to examine (1) how community colleges meet the workforce training needs of their communities; (2) what community colleges do to integrate with the nation's one-stop system; (3) the conditions or practices that enhance or impede these efforts; and (4) the actions the Departments of Labor and Education have taken to encourage linkages between community colleges and the workforce investment system, including one-stops. To address these objectives, GAO visited 20 community colleges, surveyed one-stop centers and their associated workforce investment boards, and talked to Labor and Education officials. The community colleges that GAO visited developed various approaches and programs for career and technical training to meet the needs of industry sectors, individual employers, and certain types of students and workers. Through a variety of outreach, relationship building, and data collection efforts, community colleges have come to understand the specific training needs of key industries in their regions and use this information to keep programs current or develop new programs to address these needs. Community college activities include providing contract or customized training to the employees of specific employers; working with small businesses; and targeting training and education programs to specific populations, such as disadvantaged adults, high-school students transitioning to college, and one-stop clients. Nationwide, GAO estimated that about 11 percent of one-stops are operated solely or jointly by a community college, while 34 percent have community college staff colocated at the center. Similarly, GAO estimated that, nationwide, 49 percent of local workforce investment boards have community college presidents represented on their boards. Some of the benefits of these arrangements include cost sharing and improved communication among participating programs. Officials at the colleges and one-stops that GAO visited reported also conducting other joint activities, such as strategic planning and data sharing. Community college and workforce officials cited state funding and leadership as factors that help integration between community colleges and the workforce system but identified WIA performance system measures and WIA funding issues as impediments. Under WIA, states and local workforce areas must meet performance levels in their Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth programs that can be difficult to obtain when serving some populations, such as those on Temporary Assistance for Needy Families or youth, causing disincentives for the one-stops to serve them. In a 2004 report, GAO recommended that the Labor Department develop a systematic way to account for differences in the population groups served by states' one-stop centers and apply it to all states when establishing their performance levels. To date, Labor has not taken action on this recommendation; however, Labor officials stated that states may use their own adjustment models and that the department has worked to ensure consistency in the process. It is uncertain whether Labor and Education's efforts to build linkages between community colleges and the workforce system will be successful in encouraging community colleges to focus on workforce development. Labor's WIRED, High Growth, and Community Based grants aim, in part, to help community colleges and other workforce entities collaborate. As discussed in GAO's recent report on these grants,Labor's evaluations do not fully measure their effectiveness, and GAO recommends that Labor take steps to do so. Labor and Education jointly funded a $1.5 million initiative in 2006 to help build linkages between community colleges and the workforce system. The agencies did not conduct an evaluation, but plan to issue a report in 2008 about the participants' challenges and successes. Four appendixes include: (1) Objectives, Scope and Methodology; (2) Community Colleges Selected for Site Visits; (3) Comments from the Department of Labor; and (4) GAO Contact and Staff Acknowledgments. (Contains 24 footnotes, 1 figure, and 3 tables.).
Categories:

Asset Building and Community Development

Asset Building and Community Development

In this chapter, we focus on the labor market skills of individuals, especially the
role of workforce development networks in building these skills, which is the main
focus of many community development programs. Human capital, however, has ...

Author: Gary Paul Green

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 9781412951340

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 301

View: 433

Can residents work together to improve the quality of life in their community? Asset Building and Community Development examines the promise and limits of community development and explores how communities are building on their key assets such as physical, human, social, financial, environmental, political and cultural capital.
Categories: Business & Economics

Linking Training to Performance

Linking Training to Performance

s we have seen, one of the most significant contributions of community colleges
to American society is their workforce development activity. About three fifths of
more than 5 million credit-taking community college students are pursuing an ...

Author: William J. Rothwell

Publisher: Amer. Assn. of Community Col

ISBN: 9780871173614

Category: Education

Page: 232

View: 224

In the coming years, escalating retirement and turnover rates among community college administrators and faculty will decidedly create a void for professionals in the workforce development field. Using this book as your field guide, you can expand your range of knowledge and skills, enhancing local institutional and program experience to better respond to local workforce needs.
Categories: Education

Examining the Impact of Community Colleges on the Global Workforce

Examining the Impact of Community Colleges on the Global Workforce

By doing this, they also enhance their workforce development programs.
However, a community college alone cannot adequately address soft skills and
career readiness of traditional-aged college students; they need to work with
business ...

Author: Jones, Stephanie J.

Publisher: IGI Global

ISBN: 9781466684829

Category: Education

Page: 295

View: 131

In an effort to create a more educated workforce in the United States, many community colleges are implementing new practices and strategies to assist under-prepared students. These efforts will ultimately support a stronger and more resilient global workforce. Examining the Impact of Community Colleges on the Global Workforce provides relevant theoretical and conceptual frameworks, best practices, and emerging empirical research about new approaches being employed in community colleges to prepare students for their post-collegiate careers. Featuring recent initiatives in educational settings, this publication is a critical reference source for higher education practitioners, policymakers, and graduate students in higher education administration programs interested in the innovative practices utilized by community colleges to educate underserved students.
Categories: Education

Community Economic Development in Social Work

Community Economic Development in Social Work

The Bedford Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation, the New Community
Corporation, the Watts Labor Community Action ... successful large-scale
manpower development programs and pioneered the comprehensive workforce
development ...

Author: Steven D. Soifer

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231508575

Category: Social Science

Page: 544

View: 190

Community economic development (CED) is an increasingly essential factor in the revitalization of low- to moderate-income communities. This cutting-edge text explores the intersection of CED and social work practice, which both focus on the well-being of indigent communities and the empowerment of individuals and the communities in which they live. This unique textbook emphasizes a holistic approach to community building that combines business and real-estate development with a focus on stimulating family self-reliance and community empowerment. The result is an innovative approach to rehabilitating communities in decline while preserving resident demographics. The authors delve deep into the social, political, human, and financial capital involved in effecting change and how race and regional issues can complicate approaches and outcomes. Throughout, they integrate case examples to illustrate their strategies and conclude with a consideration of the critical role social workers can play in developing CED's next phase.
Categories: Social Science

Workforce Development Politics

Workforce Development Politics

Ideally, a high-level civic coalition would be able to involve community colleges,
technical centers, and vocational ... With substantial resources and a guiding
structure, a coalition should be able to move workforce development from the ...

Author: Robert Giloth

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 1592132294

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 289

View: 713

If 88% of Americans believe that education and training resources should be available to the jobless and more than two-thirds of employers have identified workforce and skills shortages as top priorities, why aren't we, as a society, able to provide that training in such a way that it leads to long-term economic security? This book looks at the politics of local and regional workforce development: the ways politicians and others concerned with the workforce systems have helped or hindered that process. Contributors examine the current systems that are in place in these cities and the potential for systemic reform through case studies of Denver, Milwaukee, Philadelphia, St. Louis, and Seattle.Published in association with the Annie E. Casey Foundation.
Categories: Business & Economics

The State of Nonprofit America

The State of Nonprofit America

See M. Bryna Sanger, “Competing for Contracts: Nonprofit Survival in an Age of
Privatization,” in Communities and Workforce Development, edited by Edwin
Meléndez (Kalamazoo, Mich.: Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, 2004),
p.

Author: Lester M Salamon

Publisher: Brookings Institution Press

ISBN: 9780815724360

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 708

View: 867

Today, America's nonprofit organizations seem caught in a force field, buffeted by four impulses—voluntarism, professionalism, civic activism, and commercialism. Too little attention, however, has been paid to the significant tensions among these impulses. Understanding this force field and the factors shaping its dynamics thus becomes central to understanding the future of particular organizations and of the nonprofit sector as a whole. In this second edition of an immensely successful volume, Lester Salamon and his colleagues offer an overview of the current state of America's nonprofit sector, examining the forces that are shaping its future and identifying the changes that might be needed. The State of Nonprofit America has been completely revised and updated to reflect changing political realities and the punishing economic climate currently battering the nonprofit sector, which faces significant financial challenges during a time when its services are needed more than ever. The result is a comprehensive analysis of a set of institutions that Alexis de Tocqueville recognized to be "more deserving of our attention" than any other part of the American experiment.
Categories: Business & Economics

Promoting Sustainable Local and Community Economic Development

Promoting Sustainable Local and Community Economic Development

... however, created a workforce development collaborative (encompassing more
than a dozen local organizations) that is taken “on the road,” blanketing the
Garfield, Larimer, and East Liberty neighborhoods. Two longtime community-
based ...

Author: Roland V. Anglin

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 9781439857236

Category: Political Science

Page: 301

View: 154

Growing local economies, empowering communities, revitalizing downtowns, developing entrepreneurship, building leadership, and enhancing nonprofits — you can achieve all these benefits and more with a comprehensive and strategic revitalization plan. Chronicling the struggle of local revitalization as organizers move from trial and error to effective revitalization strategies, Promoting Sustainable Local and Community Economic Development documents the current transformation in community revitalization from market-based incentives to mixed strategies of public sector learning, partnerships, and community capacity. Knowledge about the field and what works is growing, but not always publicized and readily accessible. This reference surveys the breadth of innovative place and people development practices, presenting lessons and examples at a general and textured level, putting information about innovative ways to change, influence, and improve the economic development process within easy reach. Roland Anglin brings his unique vantage point to the topic; his experience as a practitioner and applied academic allowed him to see how community economic development practices grow over time in size, scale, and impact. He highlights the difference between what is now termed community economic development (CED) and traditional local economic development practice, specifically the priority placed on community involvement in economic development partnerships between the private sector and government. The book includes case studies that demonstrate what has and has not worked in revitalization efforts, as well as how active public and private sector partnerships have been the most effective in revitalization efforts. A Resource Guide is included at the end of the book for readers who may want a more expansive understanding of community economic development.
Categories: Political Science

Asset Building Community Development

Asset Building   Community Development

In many communities, however, human capital is underutilized. Human capital ...
In this chapter, we focus on the labor market skills of individuals, especially the
role of workforce development networks in building these skills. Human capital ...

Author: Gary Paul Green

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 9781412982238

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 339

View: 232

Employing a broad definition of community development, this book shows how asset building can help increase the capacity of residents to improve their quality of life. It provides students and practitioners with theoretical and practical guidance on how to mobilize community capital (physical, human, social, financial, environmental, political, and cultural) to effect positive change. Authors Gary Paul Green and Anna Haines show that development controlled by community-based organizations provides a better match between these assets and the needs of the communities.
Categories: Business & Economics

Virtual Learning Communities

Virtual Learning Communities

The chapter introduces the concept of learning communities and explores their
relationships with other types of learning groups. It discusses the role of learning
communities in workforce development and the growth of virtual learning ...

Author: Dina Lewis

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education (UK)

ISBN: 9780335226221

Category: Education

Page: 222

View: 630

This user-friendly guide is written to help managers, professionals and learners, planning, facilitating or participating in online learning communities, as part of a structured learning programme, as an approach to continuous professional development, as a means of improving performance at work or as a dynamic approach to innovation and collaborative working.
Categories: Education

Chief Academic Officers Perspectives on Workforce Development in Their Community College

Chief Academic Officers  Perspectives on Workforce Development in Their Community College

Chief Academic Officers ' Perspectives on Workforce Development in Their
Community College From humble beginnings near the advent of the twentieth
century through a post - war explosion of enrollment in the fifties and rapid
institutional ...

Author: Timothy M. Jackson

Publisher:

ISBN: MSU:31293023740537

Category: Community college administrators

Page: 232

View: 953

Categories: Community college administrators

Jobs and Economic Development in Minority Communities

Jobs and Economic Development in Minority Communities

In the Delaware Valley around Philadelphia, for example, community leaders
developed a regional Reinvestment Fund, which has provided valuable financing
for affordable housing, community service, and workforce development programs
 ...

Author: Paul M. Ong

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 1592134114

Category: Political Science

Page: 314

View: 941

A new agenda for revitalizing minority neighborhoods.
Categories: Political Science

Introduction to Community Development

Introduction to Community Development

With James A. Christenson, he co-edited Community Development in America (
1989) and Community Development in ... His applied research, teaching, and
outreach interests focus on community, economic, and workforce development.

Author: Jerry W. Robinson, Jr.

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 9781412974622

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 315

View: 845

Introduction to Community Development provides students of community and economic development with a theoretical and practical introduction to the field of community development. Bringing together leading scholars in the field of community development, the book follows the curriculum needs in offering a progression from theory to practice, beginning with a theoretical overview, an historical overview, and the various approaches to community development.
Categories: Business & Economics

Do Community Colleges Respond to Local Needs

Do Community Colleges Respond to Local Needs

American community colleges are complex institutions committed to a number of
different missions and to serving a variety ... In their workforce development role,
community colleges serve a key economic development function by developing ...

Author: Duane E. Leigh

Publisher: W.E. Upjohn Institute

ISBN: 9780880993289

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 219

View: 165

In recent years, American community colleges have evolved as the missions facing them expanded and their constituencies changed. No longer is their role solely to prepare students to transfer to four-year institutions and to provide occupational training. Now, they must also provide basic adult education, including esl, and serve an economic development role by implementing training programs that assist in retaining existing employers and attracting new ones. Have these expanded efforts addressed their constituents' requirements or are community colleges failing to be as responsive as they need to be? Leigh and Gill use data from California's community college system to address this question. Their efforts focus on two major, policy relevant sources of change at the local level. First, on the supply side, they examine how responsive community colleges' are at meeting the needs of the growing immigrant population for education and training. Then, on the demand side, Leigh and Gill look into whether the need of local employers for skilled workers is being met, an issue impacted by dynamic technological change and increased global competition. The result is a book that identifies key patterns that community colleges should be aware of in order to remain responsive in their communities. Following an introduction, the following chapters are contained in this book: (2) Development of the California Community College System; (3) Studies of the Effect of Community Colleges on Educational Attainment; (4) Studies of Community Colleges? Responsiveness to Changes in Employer Skill Requirements; (5) Responsiveness to the Educational Needs of Immigrants by Narrowly Defined Ethnic Categories; (6) Community Colleges? Responsiveness to Local Labor Market Demand; and (7) Summary and Policy Implications.
Categories: Business & Economics

The 21st Century Community College

The 21st Century Community College

Twenty - first century community colleges will be characterized by their pivotal
role in a seamless system of education , workforce development , and economic
development . As Norton Grubb observed , " Modern community colleges have a
 ...

Author: George V. Donokov

Publisher: Nova Publishers

ISBN: 1600211917

Category: Education

Page: 198

View: 424

The Community College Labor Market Responsiveness (CCLMR) Initiative was created to develop and disseminate information and tools enabling community colleges to keep pace with the needs of a diverse student body and a dynamic labour market. This report draws upon profiles (Appendix B) and statistical evidence (Appendix C) to describe the factors that affect labour-market responsiveness. First, it examines the effects of the external environment, the characteristics of local residents and the nature of the local economy. Second, it examines the effects of the external organisational structure, the state and local community workforce, education, and economic development infrastructure. Third, it examines colleges' external governance structures, which affect their mission, resource base, and flexibility. Finally, it examines the effects of factors under the college's control, presidential leadership, internal organisation, strategic planning to design and fund programs, use of data, and programmatic base. Each stage in the progression has strong, if not decisive, effects on the successive stage, and ultimately on each college's potential to be market-responsive, and the nature of the obstacles that need to be overcome to realise its potential. The progression is emphasised to make it clear that more should be expected of colleges located in environments that are favourable to development of labour-market responsive programs than where external conditions are unfavourable, not that colleges in favourable environments should complacently compare themselves to colleges in less favourable environments. This emphasis also helps clarify what colleges can do regardless of their external environment to overcome obstacles to become more responsive and reach their own unique potential.
Categories: Education