Common Ground

A Turbulent Decade in the Lives of Three American Families

Author: J. Anthony Lukas

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 030782375X

Category: Social Science

Page: 688

View: 9446

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award, and the American Book Award, the bestselling Common Ground is much more than the story of the busing crisis in Boston as told through the experiences of three families. As Studs Terkel remarked, it's "gripping, indelible...a truth about all large American cities." "An epic of American city life...a story of such hypnotic specificity that we re-experience all the shades of hope and anger, pity and fear that living anywhere in late 20th-century America has inevitably provoked." —Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, The New York Times
Release

Nightmare

The Underside of the Nixon Years

Author: J. Anthony Lukas

Publisher: New York : Viking Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Watergate Affair, 1972-1974

Page: 626

View: 6222

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Release

When Spirit Calls

A Healing Odyssey

Author: Joan Diver

Publisher: Monkfish Book Publishing

ISBN: 1939681685

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 284

View: 1635

DOWNLOAD NOW »

“An extraordinary exploration into the world of healing ministries, spiritual guides, and esoteric experiences. Those who remain enclosed in a world of ‘hard facts’ will be challenged, for sure, but those who are open to other dimensions, other worlds within this one, have a wide-eyed journey ahead.” -- Rev. Samuel T. Lloyd III, Rector, Trinity Church, Boston “Joan Diver is a highly respected leader and accomplished foundation executive who left an inspiring legacy of social change. Her grounding in work for justice, followed by her fall into faith and mystery is captured in this compelling, provocative and generous telling of her journey. I found myself turning pages as if reading a mystery novel, all the while experiencing a deep healing.” --Pat Brandes, Former COO, United Way of Massachusetts Bay When Spirit Calls is at once an adventure story and meditation on the healing journey that traces Joan Diver's odyssey from Boston foundation executive to spiritual healer. Imbued with the wisdom of great spiritual teachers from both East and West, Joan Diver shares a remarkable journey through urban violence, family crisis, physical pain and spiritual awakening. Joan Diver’s family is one of three profiled in J. Anthony Lukas' Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Common Ground: A Turbulent Decade in the Lives of Three American Families. A national bestseller in 1985, it is still taught in classrooms today. Joan and Colin Diver continue to be treated as celebrities by Boston media and those touched by the pain of their story and the school-busing crisis of the 1970s and '80s.
Release

America in Black and White

One Nation, Indivisible

Author: Stephan Thernstrom,Abigail Thernstrom

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781439129098

Category: Social Science

Page: 704

View: 7783

DOWNLOAD NOW »

In a book destined to become a classic, Stephan and Abigail Thernstrom present important new information about the positive changes that have been achieved and the measurable improvement in the lives of the majority of African-Americans. Supporting their conclusions with statistics on education, earnings, and housing, they argue that the perception of serious racial divisions in this country is outdated -- and dangerous.
Release

Encyclopedia of Diversity and Social Justice

Author: Sherwood Thompson

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1442216069

Category: Education

Page: 816

View: 2251

DOWNLOAD NOW »

This encyclopedia contains over 300 entries alphabetically arranged for straightforward use by scholars and general readers alike. Thompson, assisted by a network of contributors and consultants, provides a comprehensive and systematic collection of designated entries that describe, in detail, important diversity and social justice themes.
Release

The Sixties

From Memory to History

Author: David Farber

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469608731

Category: History

Page: 342

View: 1688

DOWNLOAD NOW »

This collection of original essays represents some of the most exciting ways in which historians are beginning to paint the 1960s onto the larger canvas of American history. While the first literature about this turbulent period was written largely by participants, many of the contributors to this volume are young scholars who came of age intellectually in the 1970s and 1980s and thus write from fresh perspectives. The essayists ask fundamental questions about how much America really changed in the 1960s and why certain changes took place. In separate chapters, they explore how the great issues of the decade--the war in Vietnam, race relations, youth culture, the status of women, the public role of private enterprise--were shaped by evolutions in the nature of cultural authority and political legitimacy. They argue that the whirlwind of events and problems we call the Sixties can only be understood in the context of the larger history of post-World War II America. Contents "Growth Liberalism in the Sixties: Great Societies at Home and Grand Designs Abroad," by Robert M. Collins "The American State and the Vietnam War: A Genealogy of Power," by Mary Sheila McMahon "And That's the Way It Was: The Vietnam War on the Network Nightly News," by Chester J. Pach, Jr. "Race, Ethnicity, and the Evolution of Political Legitimacy," by David R. Colburn and George E. Pozzetta "Nothing Distant about It: Women's Liberation and Sixties Radicalism," by Alice Echols "The New American Revolution: The Movement and Business," by Terry H. Anderson "Who'll Stop the Rain?: Youth Culture, Rock 'n' Roll, and Social Crises," by George Lipsitz "Sexual Revolution(s)," by Beth Bailey "The Politics of Civility," by Kenneth Cmiel "The Silent Majority and Talk about Revolution," by David Farber
Release

Five Miles Away, A World Apart

One City, Two Schools, and the Story of Educational Opportunity in Modern America

Author: James E. Ryan

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199798923

Category: Education

Page: 400

View: 5681

DOWNLOAD NOW »

How is it that, half a century after Brown v. Board of Education, educational opportunities remain so unequal for black and white students, not to mention poor and wealthy ones? In his important new book, Five Miles Away, A World Apart, James E. Ryan answers this question by tracing the fortunes of two schools in Richmond, Virginia--one in the city and the other in the suburbs. Ryan shows how court rulings in the 1970s, limiting the scope of desegregation, laid the groundwork for the sharp disparities between urban and suburban public schools that persist to this day. The Supreme Court, in accord with the wishes of the Nixon administration, allowed the suburbs to lock nonresidents out of their school systems. City schools, whose student bodies were becoming increasingly poor and black, simply received more funding, a measure that has proven largely ineffective, while the independence (and superiority) of suburban schools remained sacrosanct. Weaving together court opinions, social science research, and compelling interviews with students, teachers, and principals, Ryan explains why all the major education reforms since the 1970s--including school finance litigation, school choice, and the No Child Left Behind Act--have failed to bridge the gap between urban and suburban schools and have unintentionally entrenched segregation by race and class. As long as that segregation continues, Ryan forcefully argues, so too will educational inequality. Ryan closes by suggesting innovative ways to promote school integration, which would take advantage of unprecedented demographic shifts and an embrace of diversity among young adults. Exhaustively researched and elegantly written by one of the nation's leading education law scholars, Five Miles Away, A World Apart ties together, like no other book, a half-century's worth of education law and politics into a coherent, if disturbing, whole. It will be of interest to anyone who has ever wondered why our schools are so unequal and whether there is anything to be done about it.
Release

The Challenge of American History

Author: Louis P. Masur

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801862229

Category: History

Page: 331

View: 1548

DOWNLOAD NOW »

In The Challenge of American History, Louis Masur brings together a sampling of recent scholarship to determine the key issues preoccupying historians of American history and to contemplate the discipline's direction for the future. The fifteen summary essays included in this volume allow professional historians, history teachers, and students to grasp in a convenient and accessible form what historians have been writing about.
Release

Law and Order

Street Crime, Civil Unrest, and the Crisis of Liberalism in the 1960s

Author: Michael W. Flamm

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231509723

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 962

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Law and Order offers a valuable new study of the political and social history of the 1960s. It presents a sophisticated account of how the issues of street crime and civil unrest enhanced the popularity of conservatives, eroded the credibility of liberals, and transformed the landscape of American politics. Ultimately, the legacy of law and order was a political world in which the grand ambitions of the Great Society gave way to grim expectations. In the mid-1960s, amid a pervasive sense that American society was coming apart at the seams, a new issue known as law and order emerged at the forefront of national politics. First introduced by Barry Goldwater in his ill-fated run for president in 1964, it eventually punished Lyndon Johnson and the Democrats and propelled Richard Nixon and the Republicans to the White House in 1968. In this thought-provoking study, Michael Flamm examines how conservatives successfully blamed liberals for the rapid rise in street crime and then skillfully used law and order to link the understandable fears of white voters to growing unease about changing moral values, the civil rights movement, urban disorder, and antiwar protests. Flamm documents how conservatives constructed a persuasive message that argued that the civil rights movement had contributed to racial unrest and the Great Society had rewarded rather than punished the perpetrators of violence. The president should, conservatives also contended, promote respect for law and order and contempt for those who violated it, regardless of cause. Liberals, Flamm argues, were by contrast unable to craft a compelling message for anxious voters. Instead, liberals either ignored the crime crisis, claimed that law and order was a racist ruse, or maintained that social programs would solve the "root causes" of civil disorder, which by 1968 seemed increasingly unlikely and contributed to a loss of faith in the ability of the government to do what it was above all sworn to do-protect personal security and private property.
Release