Comanches

The Destruction of a People

Author: T. R. Fehrenbach

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780735101661

Category: History

Page: 557

View: 3654

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Describes the culture and history of the Nermernuh plains Indians from their prehistoric beginnings through their gradual disintegration as an independent nation.
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The Encyclopedia of North American Indian Wars, 1607–1890: A Political, Social, and Military History [3 volumes]

A Political, Social, and Military History

Author: Spencer C. Tucker

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1851096035

Category: Social Science

Page: 1318

View: 8305

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This encyclopedia provides a broad, in-depth, and multidisciplinary look at the causes and effects of warfare between whites and Native Americans, encompassing nearly three centuries of history. • Entries written by over 50 leading scholars in the field • 25 charts • 26 maps • A glossary of terms
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The Comanche Empire

Author: Pekka Hämäläinen

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300151179

Category: History

Page: 500

View: 3325

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A study that uncovers the lost history of the Comanches shows in detail how the Comanches built their unique empire and resisted European colonization, and why they were defeated in 1875.
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I Fought a Good Fight

A History of the Lipan Apaches

Author: Sherry Robinson

Publisher: University of North Texas Press

ISBN: 1574415069

Category: History

Page: 495

View: 3225

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This history of the Lipan Apaches, from archeological evidence to the present, tells the story of some of the least known, least understood people in the Southwest. These plains buffalo hunters and traders were one of the first groups to acquire horses, and with this advantage they expanded from the Panhandle across Texas and into Coahuila, coming into conflict with the Comanches. Robinson tracks the Lipans from their earliest interactions with Spaniards and kindred Apache groups through later alliances and to their love-hate relationships with Mexicans, Texas colonists, Texas Rangers, and the US Army.
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Los Comanches

The Horse People, 1751-1845

Author: Stanley Noyes

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780826315489

Category: Comanche Indians

Page: 364

View: 726

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This book offers a large, sweeping history of the Comanche Indians, who dominated the Southern Plains from the mid-18th to the mid-19th century. No plains people was more feared or admired for its mastery of warfare and life in a harsh, arid environment. Euro and Native Americans alike anxiously dreaded the ferocity of Comanche enmity yet avidly sought the uncertainty of Comanche friendship. In this richly textured history, Stanley Noyes explores the golden century of Comanche domi-nation of the Southern Plains. 'While his narrative recounts the relations of Comanches to Spanish, French, Mexican, American, and Native American neighbors, his vignettes provide vivid glimpses into Comanche culture and society. This is a sensitive portrait of human society and physical place. By the end of the book, we understand the Comanches both as a peerless warrior society and as an embattled people.
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The Comanches

Lords of the South Plains

Author: Ernest Wallace,E. Adamson Hoebel

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 0806150203

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 6946

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The fierce bands of Comanche Indians, on the testimony of their contemporaries, both red and white, numbered some of the most splendid horsemen the world has ever produced. Often the terror of other tribes, who, on finding a Comanche footprint in the Western plains country, would turn and go in the other direction, they were indeed the Lords of the South Plains. For more than a century and a half, since they had first moved into the Southwest from the north, the Comanches raided and pillaged and repelled all efforts to encroach on their hunting grounds. They decimated the pueblo of Pecos, within thirty miles of Santa Fé. The Spanish frontier settlements of New Mexico were happy enough to let the raiding Comanches pass without hindrance to carry their terrorizing forays into Old Mexico, a thousand miles down to Durango. The Comanches fought the Texans, made off with their cattle, burned their homes, and effectively made their own lands unsafe for the white settlers. They fought and defeated at one time or another the Utes, Pawnees, Osages, Tonkawas, Apaches, and Navahos. These were "The People," the spartans of the prairies, the once mighty force of Comanches, a surprising number of whom survive today. More than twenty-five hundred live in the midst of an alien culture which as grown up around them. This book is the story of that tribe—the great traditions of the warfare, life, and institutions of another century that are today vivid memories among its elders. Despite their prolonged resistance, the Comanches, too, had to "come in." On a sultry summer day in June 1875, a small band of starving tribesmen straggled in to Fort Sill, near the Wichita Mountains in what is now the southwestern part of the state of Oklahoma. There they surrendered to the military authorities. So ended the reign of the Comanches on the southwestern frontier. Their horses had been captured and destroyed; the buffalo were gone; most of their tipis had been burned. They had held out to the end, but the time had now come for them to submit to the United States government demands.
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The Searchers

The Making of an American Legend

Author: Glenn Frankel

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1620400642

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 461

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New York Times Bestseller Named one of the best books of the year by: Parade The Guardian Kirkus Library Journal The true story behind the classic Western The Searchers by Pulitzer Prize-wining writer Glenn Frankel that the New York Times calls "A vivid, revelatory account of John Ford's 1956 masterpiece." In 1836 in East Texas, nine-year-old Cynthia Ann Parker was kidnapped by Comanches. She was raised by the tribe and eventually became the wife of a warrior. Twenty-four years after her capture, she was reclaimed by the U.S. cavalry and Texas Rangers and restored to her white family, to die in misery and obscurity. Cynthia Ann's story has been told and re-told over generations to become a foundational American tale. The myth gave rise to operas and one-act plays, and in the 1950s to a novel by Alan LeMay, which would be adapted into one of Hollywood's most legendary films, The Searchers, "The Biggest, Roughest, Toughest... and Most Beautiful Picture Ever Made!" directed by John Ford and starring John Wayne. Glenn Frankel, beginning in Hollywood and then returning to the origins of the story, creates a rich and nuanced anatomy of a timeless film and a quintessentially American myth. The dominant story that has emerged departs dramatically from documented history: it is of the inevitable triumph of white civilization, underpinned by anxiety about the sullying of white women by "savages." What makes John Ford's film so powerful, and so important, Frankel argues, is that it both upholds that myth and undermines it, baring the ambiguities surrounding race, sexuality, and violence in the settling of the West and the making of America.
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The Comanches

A History, 1706-1875

Author: Thomas W. Kavanagh

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803277922

Category: History

Page: 586

View: 1637

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This is the first in-depth historical study of Comanche social and political groups. Using the ethnohistorical method, Thomas W. Kavanagh traces the changes and continuities in Comanche politics from their earliest interactions with Europeans to their settlement on a reservation in present-day Oklahoma.
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A People and a Nation: A History of the United States, Brief Edition

Author: Mary Beth Norton,Jane Kamensky,Carol Sheriff,David W. Blight,Howard Chudacoff

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 1305142764

Category: History

Page: 960

View: 9032

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The Brief Edition of A PEOPLE AND A NATION offers a succinct and spirited narrative that tells the stories of all people in the United States. The authors' attention to race and racial identity, and their inclusion of everyday people and popular culture brings history to life, engaging readers and encouraging them to imagine what life was really like in the past. In the tenth edition, the number of chapters has been reduced from 33 to 29, making the text easier to assign in a typical semester. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
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Empire of the Summer Moon

Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History

Author: S.C. Gwynne

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 1849018200

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 6311

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In the tradition of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, a stunningly vivid historical account of the forty-year battle between Comanche Indians and white settlers for control of the American West, centering on Quanah, the greatest Comanche chief of them all. Empire of the Summer Moon spans two astonishing stories. The first traces the rise and fall of the Comanches, the most powerful Indian tribe in American history. The second is the epic saga of the pioneer woman Cynthia Ann Parker and her mixed-blood son Quanah, who became the last and greatest chief of the Comanches. Although readers may be more familiar with the tribal names Apache and Sioux, it was in fact the legendary fighting ability of the Comanches that determined just how and when the American West opened up. Comanche boys became adept bareback riders by age six; full Comanche braves were considered the best horsemen who ever rode. They were so masterful at war and so skillful with their arrows and lances that they stopped the northern drive of colonial Spain from Mexico and halted the French expansion westward from Louisiana. White settlers arriving in Texas from the eastern United States were surprised to find the frontier being rolled backward by Comanches incensed by the invasion of their tribal lands. Against this backdrop Gwynne presents the compelling drama of Cynthia Ann Parker, a nine-year-old girl who was kidnapped by Comanches in 1836. She grew to love her captors and became infamous as the "White Squaw" who refused to return until her tragic capture by Texas Rangers in 1860. More famous still was her son Quanah, a warrior who was never defeated and whose guerrilla wars in the Texas Panhandle made him a legend. S. C. Gwynne's account of these events is meticulously researched, intellectually provocative, and, above all, thrillingly told.
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