Classical Greek Tragedy

Classical Greek Tragedy

This book traces the historical development of these dynamics through three representative tragedies that span a 50 year period: Aeschylus' Seven Against Thebes, Sophocles' Oedipus Tyrannus, and Euripides' Helen.

Author: Judith Fletcher

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350144590

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 176

View: 311

Classical Greek Tragedy offers a comprehensive survey of the development of classical Greek tragedy combined with close readings of exemplary texts. Reconstructing how audiences in fifth-century BCE Athens created meaning from the performance of tragedy at the dramatic festivals sponsored by the city-state and its wealthiest citizens, it considers the context of Athenian political and legal structures, gender ideology, religious beliefs, and other social forces that contributed to spectators' reception of the drama. In doing so it focuses on the relationship between performers and watchers, not only Athenian male citizens, but also women and audiences throughout the ancient Mediterranean world. This book traces the historical development of these dynamics through three representative tragedies that span a 50 year period: Aeschylus' Seven Against Thebes, Sophocles' Oedipus Tyrannus, and Euripides' Helen. Topics include the role of the chorus; the tragic hero; recurring mythical characters and subject matter; Aristotelian assessments of the components of tragedy; developments in the architecture of the theater and their impact on the interactions of characters, and the spaces they occupy. Unifying these discussions is the observation that the genre articulates a reality beyond the visible stage action that intersects with the characters' existence in the present moment and resonates with the audience's religious beliefs and collective psychology. Human voices within the performance space articulate powerful forces from an invisible dimension that are activated by oaths, hymns, curses and prayers, and respond in the form of oracles and prophecies, forms of discourse which were profoundly meaningful to those who watched the original productions of tragedy.
Categories: Performing Arts

Greek Tragedy

Greek Tragedy

This volume also includes extracts from Aristophanes' comedy The Frogs and a selection from Aristotle's Poetics. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world.

Author: Aeschylus

Publisher: National Geographic Books

ISBN: 9780141439365

Category: Drama

Page: 0

View: 105

Three masterpieces of classical tragedy Containing Aeschylus's Agamemnon, Sophocles' Oedipus Rex, and Euripides' Medea, this important new selection brings the best works of the great tragedians together in one perfect introductory volume. This volume also includes extracts from Aristophanes' comedy The Frogs and a selection from Aristotle's Poetics. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.
Categories: Drama

Classical Greek Tragedy

Classical Greek Tragedy

Dillon, M. (2002) Girls and Women in Classical Greek Religion, London and New York: Routledge. Dunn, F. M. (2007) Present Shock in Late Fifth Century Greece, Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. Dunn, F. M. (1995) Tragedy's End: ...

Author: Judith Fletcher

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350144583

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 176

View: 107

Classical Greek Tragedy offers a comprehensive survey of the development of classical Greek tragedy combined with close readings of exemplary texts. Reconstructing how audiences in fifth-century BCE Athens created meaning from the performance of tragedy at the dramatic festivals sponsored by the city-state and its wealthiest citizens, it considers the context of Athenian political and legal structures, gender ideology, religious beliefs, and other social forces that contributed to spectators' reception of the drama. In doing so it focuses on the relationship between performers and watchers, not only Athenian male citizens, but also women and audiences throughout the ancient Mediterranean world. This book traces the historical development of these dynamics through three representative tragedies that span a 50 year period: Aeschylus' Seven Against Thebes, Sophocles' Oedipus Tyrannus, and Euripides' Helen. Topics include the role of the chorus; the tragic hero; recurring mythical characters and subject matter; Aristotelian assessments of the components of tragedy; developments in the architecture of the theater and their impact on the interactions of characters, and the spaces they occupy. Unifying these discussions is the observation that the genre articulates a reality beyond the visible stage action that intersects with the characters' existence in the present moment and resonates with the audience's religious beliefs and collective psychology. Human voices within the performance space articulate powerful forces from an invisible dimension that are activated by oaths, hymns, curses and prayers, and respond in the form of oracles and prophecies, forms of discourse which were profoundly meaningful to those who watched the original productions of tragedy.
Categories: Performing Arts

Greek Tragedy

Greek Tragedy

An illustrated introduction to ancient Greek tragedy, written by one of its most distinguished experts, which provides all the background information necessary for understanding the context and content of the dramas.

Author: Edith Hall

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199232512

Category: Drama

Page: 428

View: 676

An illustrated introduction to ancient Greek tragedy, written by one of its most distinguished experts, which provides all the background information necessary for understanding the context and content of the dramas. A special feature is an individual essay on every one of the surviving 33 plays.
Categories: Drama

The Living Art of Greek Tragedy

The Living Art of Greek Tragedy

The Living Art of Greek Tragedy is indispensable for anyone interested in performing Greek drama, and McDonald's engaging descriptions offer the necessary background to all those who desire to know more about the ancient world.

Author: Marianne McDonald

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253215978

Category: Drama

Page: 244

View: 510

Marianne McDonald brings together her training as a scholar of classical Greek with her vast experience in theatre and drama to help students of the classics and of theatre learn about the living performance tradition of Greek tragedy. The Living Art of Greek Tragedy is indispensable for anyone interested in performing Greek drama, and McDonald's engaging descriptions offer the necessary background to all those who desire to know more about the ancient world. With a chapter on each of the three major Greek tragedians (Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides), McDonald provides a balance of textual analysis, practical knowledge of the theatre, and an experienced look at the difficulties and accomplishments of theatrical performances. She shows how ancient Greek tragedy, long a part of the standard repertoire of theatre companies throughout the world, remains fresh and alive for contemporary audiences.
Categories: Drama

Greek Tragedy

Greek Tragedy

Why did Sophocles introduce the third actor? Why did Euripides not make better plots? So asks H.D.F Kitto in his acclaimed study of Greek tragedy, available for the first time in Routledge Classics.

Author: H.D.F. Kitto

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781136806902

Category: History

Page: 361

View: 584

'Two things give Kitto's classic book its enduring freshness: he pioneered the approach to Greek drama through internal artistry and thematic form, and he always wrote in lively and readable English.' - Oliver Taplin, University of Oxford, UK Why did Aeschylus characterize differently from Sophocles? Why did Sophocles introduce the third actor? Why did Euripides not make better plots? So asks H.D.F Kitto in his acclaimed study of Greek tragedy, available for the first time in Routledge Classics. Kitto argues that in spite of dealing with big moral and intellectual questions, the Greek dramatist is above all an artist and the key to understanding classical Greek drama is to try and understand the tragic conception of each play. In Kitto’s words ‘We shall ask what the dramatist is striving to say, not what in fact he does say about this or that.’ Through a brilliant analysis of Aeschylus’s ‘Oresteia’, the plays of Sophocles including ‘Antigone’ and ‘Oedipus Tyrannus’; and Euripides’s ‘Medea’ and ‘Hecuba’, Kitto skilfully conveys the enduring artistic and literary brilliance of the Greek dramatists. H.D.F Kitto (1897 – 1982) was a renowned British classical scholar. He lectured at the University of Glasgow from 1920-1944 before becoming Professor of Greek at Bristol University, where he taught until 1962.
Categories: History

A Companion to Greek Tragedy

A Companion to Greek Tragedy

The volume comprises 31 essays written by an international cohort of scholars. The essays are organized into four sections. The opening section on Contexts surveys Greek tragedy’s historical, religious, political, and artistic background.

Author: Justina Gregory

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781405175494

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 578

View: 893

The Blackwell Companion to Greek Tragedy provides readers with a fundamental grounding in Greek tragedy, and also introduces them to the various methodologies and the lively critical dialogue that characterize the study of Greek tragedy today. Comprises 31 original essays by an international cast of contributors, including up-and-coming as well as distinguished senior scholars Pays attention to socio-political, textual, and performance aspects of Greek tragedy All ancient Greek is transliterated and translated, and technical terms are explained as they appear Includes suggestions for further reading at the end of each chapter, and a generous and informative combined bibliography
Categories: Literary Criticism

Mask and Performance in Greek Tragedy

Mask and Performance in Greek Tragedy

A 2007 study of the mask in Greek tragedy, covering both ancient and modern performances.

Author: David Wiles

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521865227

Category: Drama

Page: 25

View: 525

A 2007 study of the mask in Greek tragedy, covering both ancient and modern performances.
Categories: Drama

Adapting Greek Tragedy

Adapting Greek Tragedy

Shows how contemporary adaptations, on the stage and on the page, can breathe new life into Greek tragedy.

Author: Vayos Liapis

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107155701

Category: Art

Page: 447

View: 946

Shows how contemporary adaptations, on the stage and on the page, can breathe new life into Greek tragedy.
Categories: Art

Classical Tragedy Greek and Roman

Classical Tragedy  Greek and Roman

(Applause Books). A collection of eight plays along with accompanying critical essays.

Author: Robert Willoughby Corrigan

Publisher: Applause Books

ISBN: UCSC:32106013699845

Category: Drama

Page: 584

View: 722

(Applause Books). A collection of eight plays along with accompanying critical essays. Includes: "The Oresteia" Aeschylus; "Prometheus Bound" Aeschylus; "Oedipus the King" Sophocles; "Antigone" Sophocles; "Medea" Euripides; "The Bakkhai" Euripides; "Oedipus" Seneca; "Medea" Seneca.
Categories: Drama