Chinese Theories of Fiction

Chinese Theories of Fiction

An ambitious, innovative work that proposes a distinctly Chinese theory of fiction.

Author: Ming Dong Gu

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 0791468151

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 302

View: 874

An ambitious, innovative work that proposes a distinctly Chinese theory of fiction.
Categories: Literary Criticism

How to Read the Chinese Novel

How to Read the Chinese Novel

This volume, a source book for the study of traditional Chinese fiction criticism from the late sixteenth to the early twentieth centuries, presents translations of writings taken from the commentary editions of six of the most important ...

Author: David L. Rolston

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400860470

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 554

View: 330

Fiction criticism has a long and influential history in pre-modern China, where critics would read and reread certain novels with a concentration and fervor far exceeding that which most Western critics give to individual works. This volume, a source book for the study of traditional Chinese fiction criticism from the late sixteenth to the early twentieth centuries, presents translations of writings taken from the commentary editions of six of the most important novels of pre-modern China. These translations consist mainly of tu-fa, or "how-to-read" essays, which demonstrate sensitivity and depth of analysis both in the treatment of general problems concerning the reading of any work of fiction and in more focused discussions of particular compositional details in individual novels. The translations were produced by pioneers in the study of this form of fiction criticism in the West: Shuen-fu Lin, Andrew H. Plaks, David T. Roy, John C. Y. Wang, and Anthony C. Yu. Four introductory essays by Andrew H. Plaks and the editor address the historical background for this type of criticism, its early development, its formal features, recurrent terminology, and major interpretive strategies. A goal of this volume is to aid in the rediscovery of this traditional Chinese poetics of fiction and help eliminate some of the distortions encountered in the past by the imposition of Western theories of fiction on Chinese novels. Originally published in 1990. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.
Categories: Literary Criticism

True Lies Worldwide

True Lies Worldwide

Fictionality in Global Contexts Anders Cullhed, Lena Rydholm. nese [...] Key concepts like journalism, ... Are Western theories of literature, genre, style, and fiction applicable to Chinese literature? Many scholars have come to the ...

Author: Anders Cullhed

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110303209

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 350

View: 313

People of all times and in all cultures have produced and consumed fiction in a variety of forms, not only for entertainment, but also to spread knowledge, religious or political beliefs. Furthermore, fiction has taken part in reflecting and shaping the cultural identity of communities as well as the identity of individuals. This volume aims to explore the concept and the use of fiction from different epochs, in different cultures and in different forms, both ancient and more recent. It covers a broad field of interests, from ancient literature, art, philosophy and theater to Bollywood productions, television series and modern electronic media. Twenty-three scholars from ten countries and from different areasand fields of interests in the Humanities assembled in Stockholm on a conference in August 2012 to exchange views on "Fiction in Global Contexts". This volume presents the results of their discussions. It contains fresh perspectives on issues and topics such as: the nature of fiction fiction and its relationship to "truth" the demand for and the function and uses of fiction the development of fiction from ancient to modern times different forms of fiction fiction in social contexts or in a gender perspective
Categories: Literary Criticism

How to Read the Chinese Novel

How to Read the Chinese Novel

This volume, a source book for the study of traditional Chinese fiction criticism from the late sixteenth to the early twentieth centuries, presents translations of writings taken from the commentary editions of six of the most important ...

Author: David L. Rolston

Publisher:

ISBN: 0691067538

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 534

View: 874

Fiction criticism has a long and influential history in pre-modern China, where critics would read and reread certain novels with a concentration and fervor far exceeding that which most Western critics give to individual works. This volume, a source book for the study of traditional Chinese fiction criticism from the late sixteenth to the early twentieth centuries, presents translations of writings taken from the commentary editions of six of the most important novels of pre-modern China. These translations consist mainly of tu-fa, or "how-to-read" essays, which demonstrate sensitivity and depth of analysis both in the treatment of general problems concerning the reading of any work of fiction and in more focused discussions of particular compositional details in individual novels. The translations were produced by pioneers in the study of this form of fiction criticism in the West: Shuen-fu Lin, Andrew H. Plaks, David T. Roy, John C. Y. Wang, and Anthony C. Yu. Four introductory essays by Andrew H. Plaks and the editor address the historical background for this type of criticism, its early development, its formal features, recurrent terminology, and major interpretive strategies. A goal of this volume is to aid in the rediscovery of this traditional Chinese poetics of fiction and help eliminate some of the distortions encountered in the past by the imposition of Western theories of fiction on Chinese novels. Originally published in 1990. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Chinese Justice the Fiction

Chinese Justice  the Fiction

76. On the current situation , see Senger , pp . 204-5 . 77. J. Liu , Chinese Theories , pp . 7–8 ; Yuan Jin , Zhongguo wenxue , pp . 1–27 ; Owen , pp . 25 , 186-93 , 594 ; Plaks , " Towards a Critical Theory , ” pp . 309-52 .

Author: Jeffrey C. Kinkley

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 0804739765

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 497

View: 874

This is a full-length study of Chinese crime fiction in all eras: ancient, modern, and contemporary. It is also the first book to apply legal scholars law and literature inquiry to the rich field of Chinese legal and literary culture.
Categories: Literary Collections

Sinologism

Sinologism

This dual orientation dominated Chinese fiction studies as early as the first quarter of the twentieth century. Scholars of Chinese fiction, using Western fiction theory as the yardstick, implicitly and explicitly viewed characteristic ...

Author: Ming Dong Gu

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780415626545

Category: POLITICAL SCIENCE

Page: 269

View: 965

Why, for centuries, have the West and the world continuously produced China knowledge that deviates from Chinese realities? Why, since the mid-nineteenth century, have Chinese intellectuals oscillated between commendation and condemnation of their own culture, and between fetishization and demonization of all things Western? And why have some of the world’s wisest thinkers expressed opinions on Chinese culture, which are simply wrong? In order to answer these questions, this book explores the process of knowledge production about China and the Chinese civilization and in turn, provides a critique of the ways in which this knowledge is formed. Ming Dong Gu argues that the misperceptions and misinterpretations surrounding China and the Chinese civilisation do not simply come from misinformation, biases, prejudices, or political interference, but follow certain taken-for-granted principles that have evolved into a cultural unconscious. Indeed, Gu argues that the conflicting accounts in China-West studies are the inevitable outcome of this cultural unconscious which constitutes the inner logic of a comprehensive knowledge system which he terms ‘Sinologism’. This book explores Sinologism’s origin, development, characteristics, and inner logic, and critiques its manifestations in the writings of Chinese, Western, and non-Western thinkers and scholars, including Montesquieu, Herder, Hegel, Marx, Weber, Russell, Pound, Wang Guowei, Guo Moruo, Gu Jiegang, Wen Yiduo, and many others in diverse disciplines from arts and humanities to social sciences. In doing so, Gu demonstrates why the existing critical models are inadequate for Chinese materials and makes an attempt to construct an alternative theory to Orientalism and postcolonialism for China-West studies and cross-cultural studies. Sinologismcrosses over the subjects of history, thought, literature, language, art, archaeology, religion, aesthetics and cultural theory, and will appeal to students and scholars of East-West studies with a particular focus on China, as well as those interested in cultural theory more broadly.
Categories: POLITICAL SCIENCE

From Deluge to Discourse

From Deluge to Discourse

Proposes a sweeping theory of flood myths, applies it to a particular text, the Mu T'ien-tzu chuan, and opens up the world of Chinese fiction to an entirely new type of analysis based on a psychoanalytic theory of the symbol.

Author: Deborah Lynn Porter

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 0791430340

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 284

View: 889

Proposes a sweeping theory of flood myths, applies it to a particular text, the Mu T'ien-tzu chuan, and opens up the world of Chinese fiction to an entirely new type of analysis based on a psychoanalytic theory of the symbol.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Chinese Visions of Progress 1895 to 1949

Chinese Visions of Progress  1895 to 1949

Surrey: Ashgate. Gu, Ming Dong (2006), Chinese Theories of Fiction. A Non-Western Narrative System. Albany: SUNY Press. Hsia, C.T. (1978), “Yen Fu and Liang Ch'i-ch'ao as Advocates of New Fiction”, in Adele Austin Rickett ed.

Author: Thomas Fröhlich

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004426528

Category: Social Science

Page: 334

View: 859

Chinese Visions of Progress, 1895 to 1949 offers a panoramic study of Chinese reflections on “progress,” its multifaceted expressions, contesting interpretations, highly optimistic implications, but also the criticism it encountered.
Categories: Social Science

Green Peony and the Rise of the Chinese Martial Arts Novel

Green Peony and the Rise of the Chinese Martial Arts Novel

The next thirty years saw the publication of quite a number of metafictional works, including Green Peony and Flowers in ... Qiancheng Li, Fictions of Enlightenment, 134–64, 167; and Ming Dong Gu, Chinese Theories of Fiction, 153–80.

Author: Margaret B. Wan

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9780791477052

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 235

View: 416

Explores the development of the Chinese martial arts novel.
Categories: Literary Criticism

China s Cosmopolitan Empire

China s Cosmopolitan Empire

Owen, End ofthe Chinese “Middle Ages,” pp. 24–33; Yang, Metamorphosis of the Private Sphere, ch. 1; Tian, Tao Yuanming, ch. 1. 47. Lu, From Historicity to Fictionality, pp. 114–125; Gu, Chinese Theories of Fiction, pp.

Author: Mark Edward Lewis

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674054196

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 619

The Tang dynasty is often called China’s “golden age,” a period of commercial, religious, and cultural connections from Korea and Japan to the Persian Gulf, and a time of unsurpassed literary creativity. Mark Lewis captures a dynamic era in which the empire reached its greatest geographical extent under Chinese rule, painting and ceramic arts flourished, women played a major role both as rulers and in the economy, and China produced its finest lyric poets in Wang Wei, Li Bo, and Du Fu.
Categories: History

Climate and Crises

Climate and Crises

24 Lena Rydholm, “Chinese Theories and Concepts of Fiction and the Issue of Transcultural Theories and Concepts of Fiction,” in True Lies Worldwide: Fictionality in Global Contexts, eds. Anders Cullhead and Lena Rydholm (Berlin and ...

Author: Ben Holgate

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351372930

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 234

View: 423

Climate and Crises: Magical Realism as Environmental Discourse makes a dual intervention in both world literature and ecocriticism by examining magical realism as an international style of writing that has long-standing links with environmental literature. The book argues that, in the era of climate change when humans are facing the prospect of species extinction, new ideas and new forms of expression are required to address what the novelist Amitav Gosh calls a "crisis of imagination." Magical realism enables writers to portray alternative intellectual paradigms, ontologies and epistemologies that typically contest the scientific rationalism derived from the European Enlightenment, and the exploitation of natural resources associated with both capitalism and imperialism. Climate and Crises explores the overlaps between magical realism and environmental literature, including their respective transgressive natures that dismantle binaries (such as human and non-human), a shared biocentric perspective that focuses on the inter-connectedness of all things in the universe, and, frequently, a critique of postcolonial legacies in formerly colonised territories. The book also challenges conventional conceptions of magical realism, arguing they are often influenced by a geographic bias in the construction of the orthodox global canon, and instead examines contemporary fiction from Asia (including China) and Australasia, two regions that have been largely neglected by scholarship of the narrative mode. As a result, the monograph modifies and expands our ideas of what magical realist fiction is.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Novel An Alternative History

The Novel  An Alternative History

But in the beginning, Chinese fiction faced the same uphill battle for respectability that fiction faced everywhere: early Chinese literature is distinguished by numerous works of history, philosophy, military theory, theology, ...

Author: Steven Moore

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9781441133366

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 704

View: 904

Encyclopedic in scope and heroically audacious, The Novel: An Alternative History is the first attempt in over a century to tell the complete story of our most popular literary form. Contrary to conventional wisdom, the novel did not originate in 18th-century England, nor even with Don Quixote, but is coeval with civilization itself. After a pugnacious introduction, in which Moore defends innovative, demanding novelists against their conservative critics, the book relaxes into a world tour of the pre-modern novel, beginning in ancient Egypt and ending in 16th-century China, with many exotic ports-of-call: Greek romances; Roman satires; medieval Sanskrit novels narrated by parrots; Byzantine erotic thrillers; 5000-page Arabian adventure novels; Icelandic sagas; delicate Persian novels in verse; Japanese war stories; even Mayan graphic novels. Throughout, Moore celebrates the innovators in fiction, tracing a continuum between these pre-modern experimentalists and their postmodern progeny. Irreverent, iconoclastic, informative, entertaining-The Novel: An Alternative History is a landmark in literary criticism that will encourage readers to rethink the novel.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Unnatural Narrative across Borders

Unnatural Narrative across Borders

It is true that Chinese narrative theory has been influenced and inspired by its Western counterpart, ... The Uneasy Narrator: Chinese Fiction from the Traditional to the Modern (1995), Mingdong Gu's Chinese Theories of Fiction: A ...

Author: Biwu Shang

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429859236

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 152

View: 589

This book actively engages with current discussion of narratology, and unnatural narrative theory in particular. Unsatisfied with the hegemony of European and Anglo-American narrative theory, it calls for a transnational and comparative turn in unnatural narrative theory, the purpose of which is to draw readers’ attention to those periphery and marginalized narratives produced in places other than England and America. It places equal weight on theoretical exploration and critical practice. The book, in addition to offering a detailed account of current scholarship of unnatural narratology, examines its core issues and critical debates as well as outlining a set of directions for its future development. To present a counterpart of Western unnatural narrative studies, this book specifically takes a close look at the experimental narratives in China and Iraq either synchronically or diachronically. In doing so, it aims, on the one hand, to show how the unnatural narratives are written and to be explained differently from those Western unnatural narrative works, and on the other hand, to use the particular cases to challenge the existing narratological framework so as to further enrich and supplement it. The book will be useful and inspiring to those scholars working in such broad fields as narrative theory, literary criticism, cultural studies, semiotics, media studies, and comparative literature and world literature studies.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Reading of Russian Literature in China

The Reading of Russian Literature in China

This is the novel argument of Ming Dong Gu, Chinese Theories of Fiction: A Non-Western Narrative System (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2006), p. 194. See, on this last, Adzhimamudova, ...

Author: M. Gamsa

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230106819

Category: History

Page: 227

View: 846

This book traces the profound influence that Russian literature, which was tied inseparably to the political victory of the Russian revolution, had on China during a period that saw the collapse of imperial rule and the rise of the Communist Party.
Categories: History

Popular Culture in Late Imperial China

Popular Culture in Late Imperial China

67 Finally , in the locus classicus of late Ch'ing theories of “ New Fiction , ” Liang's celebrated essay published ... ch'ao as Advocates of New Fiction , ” in Chinese Theories of Literature from Confucius to Liang Ch'i - ch'ao , ed .

Author: David George Johnson

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520051203

Category: China

Page: 449

View: 925

Categories: China

Fictionality and Reality in Narrative Discourse

Fictionality and Reality in Narrative Discourse

In Ch'en Ying-chen, this is expressed as a battle between a lyrical vision of ideological values and an instinctive self-clowning, in Ch'i-teng Sheng, as a form of competition between pattern and contingency, in Wang Chen-ho, as a ...

Author: Li-fen Chen

Publisher: Universal-Publishers

ISBN: 9781581120820

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 178

View: 659

This dissertation is an attempt to define a Chinese "modernism," exemplified by the narrative practices of four major writers in Taiwan today, from the perspective of comparative literature and recent development of literary theory. I propose that modernity of Taiwanese fiction is not so much a result of Western influences as an evolution of Chinese narrative tradition itself. To argue my point I delineate a poetics of Chinese narrative, from which I devise a method of reading and a criterion of evaluation for contemporary Taiwanese fiction in defining its achievement and historical significance. This study of Taiwanese fiction also aims at providing a better understanding of fundamental aesthetic assumptions of Western "modernism" in the context of its own literary tradition. Chapter One, "Introduction," investigates the theoretical foundation and its line of development in Western and Chinese poetics respectively. It first examines the Platonic view of mimesis and Aristotelian aesthetic view of fictionality and their influence on the critical tradition, the continuity of the ancient battle between philosophy and poetry as seen in the structuralist and deconstructionist theories, then the relationship between subjective fictionality and ironic objectivity in Chinese poetics, the continuity of the dilemma in the Chinese novelists in their dual allegiance to the ideal and the real. A final section gives a critical overview of the literary scene in Taiwan. The following four chapters provide examples of the internal tension between fictionality and ironic awareness in the Taiwanese modernist texts. I suggest that instead of stretching the metaphorical potential of fiction to a highly intellectualized abstraction or playing down the interpretive claims of fiction by dramatizing its vulnerability like their Western counterpart, the Taiwanese modernists create their texts on the borderline between the high and the low. Self-assertive as well as self-denying, each of them confronts his own intellectual vision with paradox and ambivalence. In Ch'en Ying-chen, this is expressed as a battle between a lyrical vision of ideological values and an instinctive self-clowning, in Ch'i-teng Sheng, as a form of competition between pattern and contingency, in Wang Chen-ho, as a celebration and abuse of the fictionality of fiction, and in Wang Wen-hsing, an intense self-parody. I conclude that the sensitivity to the irrational and contradiction, inherent with a resistance to didacticism, constitutes the best part of the Chinese humanistic tradition, which is continuously enriched with new dimensions by the contemporary Taiwanese writers.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Chinese Classic Novels Routledge Revivals

The Chinese Classic Novels  Routledge Revivals

Cites Plaks' work as exemplary accommodation of Eastern and Western theory and practice. A114. Yang, Winston, L.Y. “Western Critical and Comparative Approaches to the Study of Traditional Chinese Fiction.” PROCEEDINGS OF THE SEVENTH ...

Author: Margaret Berry

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136836589

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 324

View: 588

First published in 1988, this reissue is an important work in the field of national literary exchange. Declared by American Library Association in its Choice publication one of the ten best reference works of 1988, the volume has survived global change - politically, socially, economically, religiously, aesthetically - to promote cultural dialogue between China and the West. Besides the scores of annotated sources, the introductory essays remain as authentic and moving as the day of their appearance.
Categories: Literary Criticism

A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO WRITING FICTION AND POETRY

A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO WRITING  FICTION AND POETRY

The African American Writer's Handbook Chinese Theories of Fiction Writing Fiction Creating Fiction How to Build Fictional Characters The Norton Book of Science Fiction A Writer's Guide to Fiction Ancient Fiction Encyclopedia of Science ...

Author: The Book Store

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 9781794853515

Category:

Page:

View: 416

Categories:

The Oxford Handbook of Classical Chinese Literature 1000 BCE 900CE

The Oxford Handbook of Classical Chinese Literature  1000 BCE 900CE

These two visions of classical Chinese narrative, one emphasizing the fictional and one the historical, identify different (or even opposite) defining characteristics in ... Chinese Theories of Fiction: A Non- Western Narrative System.

Author: Wiebke Denecke

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199356607

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 672

View: 916

This volume introduces readers to classical Chinese literature from its beginnings (ca. 10th century BCE) to the tenth century CE. It asks basic questions such as: How did reading and writing practices change over these two millennia? How did concepts of literature evolve? What were the factors that shaped literary production and textual transmission? How do traditional bibliographic categories, modern conceptions of genre, and literary theories shape our understanding of classical Chinese literature? What are the recurrent and evolving concerns of writings within the period under purview? What are the dimensions of human experience they address? Why is classical Chinese literature important for our understanding of pre-modern East Asia? How does the transmission of this literature in Japan, Korea, and Vietnam define cultural boundaries? And what, in turn, can we learn from the Chinese-style literatures of Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, about Chinese literature? In addressing these questions, the Oxford Handbook of Classical Chinese Literature departs from standard literary histories and sourcebooks. It does not simply categorize literary works according to periods, authors, or texts. Its goal is to offer a new conceptual framework for thinking about classical Chinese literature by defining a four-part structure. The first section discusses the basics of literacy and includes topics such as writing systems, manuscript culture, education, and loss and preservation in textual transmission. It is followed by a second section devoted to conceptions of genre, textual organization, and literary signification throughout Chinese history. A third section surveys literary tropes and themes. The final section takes us beyond China to the surrounding cultures that adopted Chinese culture and produced Chinese style writing adapted to their own historical circumstances. The volume is sustained by a dual foci: the recuperation of historical perspectives for the period it surveys and the attempt to draw connections between past and present, demonstrating how the viewpoints and information in this volume yield insights into modern China and east Asia.
Categories: Literary Criticism